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RE: [coldwarcomms] Re: WT4 Waveguide test Netcong to Long Valley

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  • roger hendrixson
    Wayne, Thanks for the update. I ve got some feelers out about the outcome of the Waveguides after the test. Only found out the test ran through 1976. At this
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 27, 2010
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      Wayne,

      Thanks for the update.

      I've got some feelers out about the outcome of the Waveguides after the test. Only found out the test ran through 1976.

      At this point I continue to find more about the systems tested there.

      It does not look like too many people worked or visited the Netcong site. A little frustrating but understandable too.

      If you ever come across anyone from Netcong I'd like to talk to them.


      Roger>

      To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
      From: widebandit@...
      Date: Sat, 27 Nov 2010 21:48:44 +0000
      Subject: [coldwarcomms] Re: WT4 Waveguide test Netcong to Long Valley




























      To my knowledge, WT4 test right-of-way was not an easement, but was purchased outright by Long Lines.



      This was done in anticipation of extending the test route into the Philadelphia-District of Columbia corridor when traffic demand became sufficient to fully load all 57 of WT4's DS4 transponders. That would be 4,032 x 57 = 229,824 equivalent voice-circuits; with the prospect of doubling that capacity by the use of quadrature modulation. Almost half a million circuits on a single system? Big stuff in the '70s.



      Obviously, Long Line's crystal ball was somewhat cloudy with regard to WT4. The million dollar question: Is the pipe still in the ground, or did they dig it all up? Five microns of copper plating inside a 60 mm steel tube wouldn't have justified it. - waw -



      "Roger Hendrixson" <roger.hendrixson@...> wrote:

      >

      > I'll see if I can locate the test easement cable marker next trip to the Netcong site. There are 5 20 foot easements from the underground building on record. I have seen the WT4 blue prints now stored at the Netcong Outside Plant building.

      >

      > Anyone recall how or where the WT4 was configured from the tower to the building? and which equipment handled the tests?

      >

      > rlh>

      >

      > "widebandit" <widebandit@> wrote:

      > >

      > > The route came off the Netcong bluff to the SE and paralleled the 206 heading SW. At about mid-point the route crossed under the 206 and ran SE of Bartley Road; then terminated south of East Mill Road and east of Fairmount Road.

      > >

      > > I'm not sure if this is the place, but it looks like a good candidate:

      > >

      > > <http://www.bing.com/maps/?v=2&cp=qsxm3m8s1jff&lvl=19.478203235672715&dir=5.255334734271526&sty=b>

      > >

      > > One of the Jersey boys may be able to check it out.

      > >

      > > There's a cartoon map of the route in the Bell Labs Record WT4 article posted on the documents page of Albert LaFrance's Long-Lines.net website:

      > >

      > > <http://long-lines.net/documents/blr1175/blr405.html>

      > >

      > > That's about the best I can do from here - waw -

      > >

      > > "Roger Hendrixson" <roger.hendrixson@> wrote:

      > > >

      > > > Any better information on this test route and where in Long valley it terminated?

      > > >

      > >

      >


















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