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Death Valley Microwave Station

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  • OZOB99
    Nuther one I shoulda knowed but it escapes me. snippet from: www.palomar.edu/geology/DVWeb.htm Location/Access: (35o 42.625 N, 116o 53.323 W). This is at the
    Message 1 of 5 , Jul 30, 2010
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      Nuther one I shoulda knowed but it escapes me.

      snippet from:

      www.palomar.edu/geology/DVWeb.htm

      "Location/Access: (35o 42.625'N, 116o 53.323'W). This is at the far west end of the Owlshead Mountain Road, 42 miles west of CA 127 at the site of an abandoned microwave station at the west end of the Owlshead Mountains. From CA 127, head west as if you were going to either the Amargosa River Crossing or Saratoga Springs. However, continue on the main road and do not turn north to either of those two sites. At 12.3 miles west of CA 127, the main road swings into Death Valley proper and the Owlshead Mountain road begins here and heads west. Continue west from this junction for 9.9 miles. This leads you to Owl Spring and a junction to the right leads to abandoned iron mines 4 miles distant. The main road continues left (south) for 1.2 miles to the north boundary of Fort Irwin and the road to the Owlshead Mountains continues west for another 18.5 miles to the abandoned microwave station at the end of the road."
    • widebandit
      Ah... That s the Owlshead station I mentioned in post #17592 below. This is one of those one-time visit, been there, done that sites. I advise a good truck
      Message 2 of 5 , Jul 31, 2010
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        Ah... That's the Owlshead station I mentioned in post #17592 below. This is one of those one-time visit, been there, done that sites. I advise a good truck with good tires, plenty of water, and a pair of well broken in hiking shoes - in the event you need to walk the 42 miles back to highway 127. The road runs along the Ft. Irwin fence for about a half-mile.

        <http://maps.google.com/maps?q=35.7101333333,-116.8875333333>

        In August '09, Alicia Sanchez and her son planned to do some camping in Death Valley but managed to get stranded a ways off this road for several days - the boy did not survive. She may have relied too much on GPS rather than maps and situational awareness of where she really was on the planet.

        Owlshead is miss-named Trona on the 1966 Western Section Radio-Relay map on Albert's Long-Lines.net/places and routes web page. The correct site names on the route are:

        Turquoise Mtn
        Ibex
        Owlshead
        Slate
        El Paso
        Bird Spring Pass - with hop to Mojave L3/L4
        Shirley Peak
        Mt. Adelaide

        I posted photos of Ibex and Owls in the Long-Lines Western States photo album - been there, done that; no snack bar, no postcards, no T-Shirt...waw...

        --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "OZOB99" <ozob99@...> wrote:
        >
        > Nuther one I shoulda knowed but it escapes me.
        >
        > snippet from:
        >
        > www.palomar.edu/geology/DVWeb.htm
        >
        > "Location/Access: (35o 42.625'N, 116o 53.323'W). This is at the far west end of the Owlshead Mountain Road, 42 miles west of CA 127 at the site of an abandoned microwave station at the west end of the Owlshead Mountains. From CA 127, head west as if you were going to either the Amargosa River Crossing or Saratoga Springs. However, continue on the main road and do not turn north to either of those two sites. At 12.3 miles west of CA 127, the main road swings into Death Valley proper and the Owlshead Mountain road begins here and heads west. Continue west from this junction for 9.9 miles. This leads you to Owl Spring and a junction to the right leads to abandoned iron mines 4 miles distant. The main road continues left (south) for 1.2 miles to the north boundary of Fort Irwin and the road to the Owlshead Mountains continues west for another 18.5 miles to the abandoned microwave station at the end of the road."
        >
      • Pj
        Not have been THAT far into DV, but where did the power come from? Regular commerical power, or one of the remote sites that had fuel brought to it every so
        Message 3 of 5 , Jul 31, 2010
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          Not have been THAT far into DV, but where did the power come from? Regular commerical power, or one of the remote sites that had fuel brought to it every so often?

          --- On Sat, 7/31/10, widebandit <widebandit@...> wrote:

          > From: widebandit <widebandit@...>
          > Subject: [coldwarcomms] Re: Death Valley Microwave Station
          > To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
          > Date: Saturday, July 31, 2010, 4:34 AM
          > Ah...  That's the Owlshead
          > station I mentioned in post #17592 below.  This is one
          > of those one-time visit, been there, done that sites. 
          > I advise a good truck with good tires, plenty of water, and
          > a pair of well broken in hiking shoes - in the event you
          > need to walk the 42 miles back to highway 127.  The
          > road runs along the Ft. Irwin fence for about a half-mile.
          >
          > <http://maps.google.com/maps?q=35.7101333333,-116.8875333333>
          >
          > In August '09, Alicia Sanchez and her son planned to do
          > some camping in Death Valley but managed to get stranded a
          > ways off this road for several days - the boy did not
          > survive.  She may have relied too much on GPS rather
          > than maps and situational awareness of where she really was
          > on the planet.
          >
          > Owlshead is miss-named Trona on the 1966 Western Section
          > Radio-Relay map on Albert's Long-Lines.net/places and routes
          > web page.  The correct site names on the route are:
          >
          > Turquoise Mtn
          > Ibex
          > Owlshead
          > Slate
          > El Paso
          > Bird Spring Pass - with hop to Mojave L3/L4
          > Shirley Peak
          > Mt. Adelaide
          >
          > I posted photos of Ibex and Owls in the Long-Lines Western
          > States photo album - been there, done that; no snack bar, no
          > postcards, no T-Shirt...waw...
          >
          > --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com,
          > "OZOB99" <ozob99@...> wrote:
          > >
          > > Nuther one I shoulda knowed but it escapes me.
          > >
          > > snippet from:
          > >
          > > www.palomar.edu/geology/DVWeb.htm
          > >
          > > "Location/Access: (35o 42.625'N, 116o 53.323'W). 
          > This is at the far west end of the Owlshead Mountain Road,
          > 42 miles west of CA 127 at the site of an abandoned
          > microwave station at the west end of the Owlshead
          > Mountains.  From CA 127, head west as if you were going
          > to either the Amargosa River Crossing or Saratoga
          > Springs.  However, continue on the main road and do not
          > turn north to either of those two sites.  At 12.3 miles
          > west of CA 127, the main road swings into Death Valley
          > proper and the Owlshead Mountain road begins here and heads
          > west.  Continue west from this junction for 9.9
          > miles.  This leads you to Owl Spring and a junction to
          > the right leads to abandoned iron mines 4 miles
          > distant.  The main road continues left (south) for 1.2
          > miles to the north boundary of Fort Irwin and the road to
          > the Owlshead Mountains continues west for another 18.5 miles
          > to the abandoned microwave station at the end of the road."
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >     coldwarcomms-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com
          >
          >
          >
        • Mike Cowen
          I was wondering about that myself. We had a site here in AZ (Four Peaks) that clearly had the fuel flown in. I was also amazed how well muffled the generator
          Message 4 of 5 , Jul 31, 2010
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            I was wondering about that myself. We had a site
            here in AZ (Four Peaks) that clearly had the fuel
            flown in. I was also amazed how well muffled the
            generator was. At 50 ft. you couldn't hear it at all.

            During construction, did these nearly
            inaccessible sites have the materials trucked in,
            or were some flown in? Seeing some of these
            access "roads", it's hard to imagine anything
            besides a bulldozer making the trip.

            Mike


            At 01:17 PM 7/31/2010, you wrote:
            >
            >
            >Not have been THAT far into DV, but where did
            >the power come from? Regular commerical power,
            >or one of the remote sites that had fuel brought to it every so often?
            >
            >--- On Sat, 7/31/10, widebandit
            ><<mailto:widebandit%40yahoo.com>widebandit@...> wrote:
            >
            > > From: widebandit <<mailto:widebandit%40yahoo.com>widebandit@...>
            > > Subject: [coldwarcomms] Re: Death Valley Microwave Station
            > > To: <mailto:coldwarcomms%40yahoogroups.com>coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
            > > Date: Saturday, July 31, 2010, 4:34 AM
            > > Ah... That's the Owlshead
            > > station I mentioned in post #17592 below. This is one
            > > of those one-time visit, been there, done that sites.
            > > I advise a good truck with good tires, plenty of water, and
            > > a pair of well broken in hiking shoes - in the event you
            > > need to walk the 42 miles back to highway 127. The
            > > road runs along the Ft. Irwin fence for about a half-mile.
            > >
            > >
            > <<http://maps.google.com/maps?q=35.7101333333,-116.8875333333>http://maps.google.com/maps?q=35.7101333333,-116.8875333333>
            > >
            > > In August '09, Alicia Sanchez and her son planned to do
            > > some camping in Death Valley but managed to get stranded a
            > > ways off this road for several days - the boy did not
            > > survive. She may have relied too much on GPS rather
            > > than maps and situational awareness of where she really was
            > > on the planet.
            > >
            > > Owlshead is miss-named Trona on the 1966 Western Section
            > > Radio-Relay map on Albert's Long-Lines.net/places and routes
            > > web page. The correct site names on the route are:
            > >
            > > Turquoise Mtn
            > > Ibex
            > > Owlshead
            > > Slate
            > > El Paso
            > > Bird Spring Pass - with hop to Mojave L3/L4
            > > Shirley Peak
            > > Mt. Adelaide
            > >
            > > I posted photos of Ibex and Owls in the Long-Lines Western
            > > States photo album - been there, done that; no snack bar, no
            > > postcards, no T-Shirt...waw...
            > >
            > > --- In <mailto:coldwarcomms%40yahoogroups.com>coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com,
            > > "OZOB99" <ozob99@...> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > Nuther one I shoulda knowed but it escapes me.
            > > >
            > > > snippet from:
            > > >
            > > > www.palomar.edu/geology/DVWeb.htm
            > > >
            > > > "Location/Access: (35o 42.625'N, 116o 53.323'W).
            > > This is at the far west end of the Owlshead Mountain Road,
            > > 42 miles west of CA 127 at the site of an abandoned
            > > microwave station at the west end of the Owlshead
            > > Mountains. From CA 127, head west as if you were going
            > > to either the Amargosa River Crossing or Saratoga
            > > Springs. However, continue on the main road and do not
            > > turn north to either of those two sites. At 12.3 miles
            > > west of CA 127, the main road swings into Death Valley
            > > proper and the Owlshead Mountain road begins here and heads
            > > west. Continue west from this junction for 9.9
            > > miles. This leads you to Owl Spring and a junction to
            > > the right leads to abandoned iron mines 4 miles
            > > distant. The main road continues left (south) for 1.2
            > > miles to the north boundary of Fort Irwin and the road to
            > > the Owlshead Mountains continues west for another 18.5 miles
            > > to the abandoned microwave station at the end of the road."
            > > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > ------------------------------------
            > >
            > > Yahoo! Groups Links
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > <mailto:coldwarcomms-fullfeatured%40yahoogroups.com>coldwarcomms-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
            >

            ---------------------------------------------------------------
            Mike Cowen Practice random acts of kindness
            and selfless acts of beauty.
            mcowen@... -Anonymous



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • David
            ... That can be said of many sites, I bet. Just imagine all the trucks needed going up that hill at Omps.....
            Message 5 of 5 , Jul 31, 2010
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              On 7/31/10 10:38 PM, Mike Cowen wrote:


              > During construction, did these nearly
              > inaccessible sites have the materials trucked in,
              > or were some flown in? Seeing some of these
              > access "roads", it's hard to imagine anything
              > besides a bulldozer making the trip.
              >

              That can be said of many sites, I bet.

              Just imagine all the trucks needed going up that hill at Omps.....
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