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historical preservation

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  • s82917
    Someone recently asked me via email if there were any intact TD-2 stations in his area. I replied that I don t know of any in his state, but I do know of a
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 3, 2010
      Someone recently asked me via email if there were any intact TD-2 stations in his area. I replied that I don't know of any in his state, but I do know of a few scattered elsewhere around the US. I estimate that at its peak the AT&T Long Lines network had 2500 to 3000 microwave and cable main stations, repeater stations and terminals. In 1993 there was a Company wide directive to remove all equipment from microwave sites that no longer had active service, I would guess that around 95% of the microwave and cable stations were cleaned out around that time, the only ones spared seemed to be stations still carrying digital traffic. Of the remainder, most of the microwave sites that later got sold into private ownership seem to end up being stripped of equipment by the new owners. However, I know of a few microwave repeater sites that still have the original equipment installed and are likely to remain that way for the foreseeable future.

      There were far fewer microwave junction sites (main stations) than repeaters. I happen to own one, but Western Electric personnel had stripped absolutely everything out of the building long before we bought it. They even removed all of the light fixtures, we had to do our initial inspection of the building with flashlights. I think it would be interesting if at least one still complete main station was preserved for future study by those that may be so interested. The question I have is, are there any main stations out there that are still intact? Or, does anyone on the list know of such a location that may become available in the future? If so maybe a plan could be put into place to preserve one.

      Terry
    • Tom Scanlan
      Terry- I ve forgotten the name of the site, but two years ago, last time I was there, the rather large AT&T microwave site slightly north of Escanaba, MI on
      Message 2 of 2 , Mar 3, 2010
        Terry-
        I've forgotten the name of the site, but two years ago, last time I was there, the rather large AT&T microwave site slightly north of Escanaba, MI on M-35, just north of Brampton, MI. I visited the site briefly - there was a technician there - and was told the site was still a working center with several paths, as evident from the horns. Don't know its status today, however.


        Tom Scanlan





        -----Original Message-----
        From: s82917 <s82917@...>
        To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wed, Mar 3, 2010 12:48 pm
        Subject: [coldwarcomms] historical preservation





        Someone recently asked me via email if there were any intact TD-2 stations in his area. I replied that I don't know of any in his state, but I do know of a few scattered elsewhere around the US. I estimate that at its peak the AT&T Long Lines network had 2500 to 3000 microwave and cable main stations, repeater stations and terminals. In 1993 there was a Company wide directive to remove all equipment from microwave sites that no longer had active service, I would guess that around 95% of the microwave and cable stations were cleaned out around that time, the only ones spared seemed to be stations still carrying digital traffic. Of the remainder, most of the microwave sites that later got sold into private ownership seem to end up being stripped of equipment by the new owners. However, I know of a few microwave repeater sites that still have the original equipment installed and are likely to remain that way for the foreseeable future.

        There were far fewer microwave junction sites (main stations) than repeaters. I happen to own one, but Western Electric personnel had stripped absolutely everything out of the building long before we bought it. They even removed all of the light fixtures, we had to do our initial inspection of the building with flashlights. I think it would be interesting if at least one still complete main station was preserved for future study by those that may be so interested. The question I have is, are there any main stations out there that are still intact? Or, does anyone on the list know of such a location that may become available in the future? If so maybe a plan could be put into place to preserve one.

        Terry









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