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FW: Project Azorian: The CIA's Declassified History of the Glomar Explorer

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  • Albert LaFrance
    ... From: The National Security Archive [mailto:NSARCHIVE@HERMES.GWU.EDU] On Behalf Of National Security Archive Sent: Friday, February 12, 2010 6:02 PM To:
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 12, 2010
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      -----Original Message-----
      From: The National Security Archive [mailto:NSARCHIVE@...] On
      Behalf Of National Security Archive
      Sent: Friday, February 12, 2010 6:02 PM
      To: NSARCHIVE@...
      Subject: Project Azorian: The CIA's Declassified History of the Glomar
      Explorer

      National Security Archive Update, February 12, 2010

      Project Azorian: The CIA's Declassified History of the Glomar Explorer

      For more information contact:
      Matthew Aid - 202/994-7000

      http://www.nsarchive.org

      Washington, DC, February 12, 2010 - For the first time, the Central
      Intelligence Agency (CIA) has declassified substantive information on one of
      its most secret and sensitive schemes, "Project Azorian," the Agency
      codename for its ambitious plan to raise a sunken Soviet submarine from the
      floor of the Pacific Ocean in order to retrieve its secrets. Today the
      National Security Archive publishes "Project Azorian: The Story of the
      Hughes Glomar Explorer," a 50-page article from the fall 1985 edition of the
      Agency's in-house journal Studies in Intelligence. Written by a participant
      in the operation whose identity remains classified, the article discusses
      the conception and planning of the retrieval effort and the creation of a
      special ship, the Glomar Explorer, which raised portions of the submarine in
      August 1974. The National Security Archive had submitted a Freedom of
      Information Act (FOIA) request to the CIA for the document on December 12,
      2007.

      National Security Archive director Tom Blanton commented that "the Navy
      alternative to the Glomar Explorer--investigation by a deep sea
      submersible--sounds more convincing than the claim in the Studies in
      Intelligence article that Project Azorian advanced the cutting edge of deep
      sea exploration the way the CIA did on aerial and satellite reconnaissance.
      To me, Glomar resembles the Bay of Pigs more than U-2 or Corona. On the
      latter, they brought in the best people, Ed Land and the Skunk Works, on the
      former, they only talked to themselves."

      Also published today for the first time are recently declassified White
      House memoranda of conversations from 1975 which recount the reactions of
      President Ford and cabinet members to ongoing news of press leaks about the
      Glomar Explorer, including Seymour Hersh's exposé in The New York Times on
      March 19, 1975.

      Follow the link below for more information:

      http://www.nsarchive.org

      ________________________________________________________

      THE NATIONAL SECURITY ARCHIVE is an independent non-governmental research
      institute and library located at The George Washington University in
      Washington, D.C. The Archive collects and publishes declassified documents
      acquired through the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). A tax-exempt public
      charity, the Archive receives no U.S. government funding; its budget is
      supported by publication royalties and donations from foundations and
      individuals.

      _________________________________________________________

      PRIVACY NOTICE The National Security Archive does not and will never share
      the names or e-mail addresses of its subscribers with any other
      organization. Once a year, we will write you and ask for your financial
      support. We may also ask you for your ideas for Freedom of Information
      requests, documentation projects, or other issues that the Archive should
      take on. We would welcome your input, and any information you care to share
      with us about your special interests. But we do not sell or rent any
      information about subscribers to any other party.

      _________________________________________________________

      TO UNSUBSCRIBE FROM THE LIST You may leave the list at any time by sending a
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    • david.dauphinee@gmail.com
      Cool find. I ve always been fascinated with the Glomar Explorer. The whole thing was straight out of a sci-fi movie. Dave Sent via BlackBerry by AT&T ... From:
      Message 2 of 2 , Feb 12, 2010
      • 0 Attachment
        Cool find. I've always been fascinated with the Glomar Explorer. The whole thing was straight out of a sci-fi movie.

        Dave
        Sent via BlackBerry by AT&T

        -----Original Message-----
        From: "Albert LaFrance" <albert.lafrance@...>
        Date: Fri, 12 Feb 2010 18:07:56
        To: <coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com>
        Subject: [coldwarcomms] FW: Project Azorian: The CIA's Declassified History of the Glomar Explorer



        -----Original Message-----
        From: The National Security Archive [mailto:NSARCHIVE@...] On
        Behalf Of National Security Archive
        Sent: Friday, February 12, 2010 6:02 PM
        To: NSARCHIVE@...
        Subject: Project Azorian: The CIA's Declassified History of the Glomar
        Explorer

        National Security Archive Update, February 12, 2010

        Project Azorian: The CIA's Declassified History of the Glomar Explorer

        For more information contact:
        Matthew Aid - 202/994-7000

        http://www.nsarchive.org

        Washington, DC, February 12, 2010 - For the first time, the Central
        Intelligence Agency (CIA) has declassified substantive information on one of
        its most secret and sensitive schemes, "Project Azorian," the Agency
        codename for its ambitious plan to raise a sunken Soviet submarine from the
        floor of the Pacific Ocean in order to retrieve its secrets. Today the
        National Security Archive publishes "Project Azorian: The Story of the
        Hughes Glomar Explorer," a 50-page article from the fall 1985 edition of the
        Agency's in-house journal Studies in Intelligence. Written by a participant
        in the operation whose identity remains classified, the article discusses
        the conception and planning of the retrieval effort and the creation of a
        special ship, the Glomar Explorer, which raised portions of the submarine in
        August 1974. The National Security Archive had submitted a Freedom of
        Information Act (FOIA) request to the CIA for the document on December 12,
        2007.

        National Security Archive director Tom Blanton commented that "the Navy
        alternative to the Glomar Explorer--investigation by a deep sea
        submersible--sounds more convincing than the claim in the Studies in
        Intelligence article that Project Azorian advanced the cutting edge of deep
        sea exploration the way the CIA did on aerial and satellite reconnaissance.
        To me, Glomar resembles the Bay of Pigs more than U-2 or Corona. On the
        latter, they brought in the best people, Ed Land and the Skunk Works, on the
        former, they only talked to themselves."

        Also published today for the first time are recently declassified White
        House memoranda of conversations from 1975 which recount the reactions of
        President Ford and cabinet members to ongoing news of press leaks about the
        Glomar Explorer, including Seymour Hersh's expos� in The New York Times on
        March 19, 1975.

        Follow the link below for more information:

        http://www.nsarchive.org

        ________________________________________________________

        THE NATIONAL SECURITY ARCHIVE is an independent non-governmental research
        institute and library located at The George Washington University in
        Washington, D.C. The Archive collects and publishes declassified documents
        acquired through the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). A tax-exempt public
        charity, the Archive receives no U.S. government funding; its budget is
        supported by publication royalties and donations from foundations and
        individuals.

        _________________________________________________________

        PRIVACY NOTICE The National Security Archive does not and will never share
        the names or e-mail addresses of its subscribers with any other
        organization. Once a year, we will write you and ask for your financial
        support. We may also ask you for your ideas for Freedom of Information
        requests, documentation projects, or other issues that the Archive should
        take on. We would welcome your input, and any information you care to share
        with us about your special interests. But we do not sell or rent any
        information about subscribers to any other party.

        _________________________________________________________

        TO UNSUBSCRIBE FROM THE LIST You may leave the list at any time by sending a
        "SIGNOFF NSARCHIVE" command to <LISTSERV@...>. You can also
        unsubscribe from the list anytime by using the following link:
        <http://hermes.circ.gwu.edu/cgi-bin/wa?SUBED1=nsarchive&A=1>




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