Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Cylindrical-tower White House emergency sites

Expand Messages
  • Albert LaFrance
    A recent visitor to my web site had worked at one of these facilities. He advised that, as far as he knows, there were seven sites on the network: 1. Camp
    Message 1 of 16 , Jan 27, 2010
    • 0 Attachment
      A recent visitor to my web site had worked at one of these facilities. He
      advised that, as far as he knows, there were seven sites on the network:

      1. Camp David
      2. Cannonball (Mercersburg Pa.)
      3. Cowpuncher (Martinsburg WV.)
      4. Crystal (Winchester Va.)
      5. Cartwheel (DC)
      6. Cadre (Site R)
      7. Corkscrew (Boonsboro Md.)

      Note the Cadre and Cowpuncher callsigns, which were new to me. He also
      confirmed that there was a buried cable between Cannonball and the AT&T
      Project Office (Hagerstown No. 2) on nearby Hearthstone Mountain.

      He said that Cannonball had direct microwave shots to Camp David, Corkscrew
      and Cowpuncher.

      Albert
    • OZOB99
      ... I assume the Crystal location shown as Winchester was a cover name rather than an actual PEF at Winchester, since Crystal (aka Camp Crystal)was in the Mt.
      Message 2 of 16 , Jan 29, 2010
      • 0 Attachment
        --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "Albert LaFrance" <albert.lafrance@...> wrote:
        >
        > A recent visitor to my web site had worked at one of these facilities. He
        > advised that, as far as he knows, there were seven sites on the network:
        >
        > 1. Camp David
        > 2. Cannonball (Mercersburg Pa.)
        > 3. Cowpuncher (Martinsburg WV.)
        > 4. Crystal (Winchester Va.)
        > 5. Cartwheel (DC)
        > 6. Cadre (Site R)
        > 7. Corkscrew (Boonsboro Md.)
        >
        > Note the Cadre and Cowpuncher callsigns, which were new to me. He also
        > confirmed that there was a buried cable between Cannonball and the AT&T
        > Project Office (Hagerstown No. 2) on nearby Hearthstone Mountain.
        >
        > He said that Cannonball had direct microwave shots to Camp David, Corkscrew
        > and Cowpuncher.
        >
        > Albert

        I assume the Crystal location shown as Winchester was a cover name rather than an actual PEF at Winchester, since Crystal (aka Camp Crystal)was in the Mt. Weather complex.

        An interesting personal account of Camp Crystal at this site:

        http://inyourface.info/bio/MtWx.shtml (and other pages in the site)

        The author also mentions Ham radio used as back up POTUS comms and that the Navy ran the PEF sites. Some anecdotes on the KO-6 machine
        are on this page:

        http://www.jproc.ca/crypto/ko6.html
      • Albert LaFrance
        Thanks - I hadn t looked at that site (http://inyourface.info/bio/MtWx.shtml) in quite a while. Two things I found especially interesting were: (1) the
        Message 3 of 16 , Jan 29, 2010
        • 0 Attachment
          Thanks - I hadn't looked at that site
          (http://inyourface.info/bio/MtWx.shtml) in quite a while.

          Two things I found especially interesting were: (1) the "alternate White
          House" is no longer located at Mount Weather, and (2) that another alternate
          was under construction during the time he was assigned to Mt. Weather. He
          began working there in 1959.

          Albert



          From: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com [mailto:coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com] On
          Behalf Of OZOB99
          Sent: Friday, January 29, 2010 10:18 PM
          To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [coldwarcomms] Re: Cylindrical-tower White House emergency sites







          --- In coldwarcomms@ <mailto:coldwarcomms%40yahoogroups.com>
          yahoogroups.com, "Albert LaFrance" <albert.lafrance@...> wrote:
          >
          > A recent visitor to my web site had worked at one of these facilities. He
          > advised that, as far as he knows, there were seven sites on the network:
          >
          > 1. Camp David
          > 2. Cannonball (Mercersburg Pa.)
          > 3. Cowpuncher (Martinsburg WV.)
          > 4. Crystal (Winchester Va.)
          > 5. Cartwheel (DC)
          > 6. Cadre (Site R)
          > 7. Corkscrew (Boonsboro Md.)
          >
          > Note the Cadre and Cowpuncher callsigns, which were new to me. He also
          > confirmed that there was a buried cable between Cannonball and the AT&T
          > Project Office (Hagerstown No. 2) on nearby Hearthstone Mountain.
          >
          > He said that Cannonball had direct microwave shots to Camp David,
          Corkscrew
          > and Cowpuncher.
          >
          > Albert

          I assume the Crystal location shown as Winchester was a cover name rather
          than an actual PEF at Winchester, since Crystal (aka Camp Crystal)was in the
          Mt. Weather complex.

          An interesting personal account of Camp Crystal at this site:

          http://inyourface. <http://inyourface.info/bio/MtWx.shtml>
          info/bio/MtWx.shtml (and other pages in the site)

          The author also mentions Ham radio used as back up POTUS comms and that the
          Navy ran the PEF sites. Some anecdotes on the KO-6 machine
          are on this page:

          http://www.jproc. <http://www.jproc.ca/crypto/ko6.html> ca/crypto/ko6.html







          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Albert LaFrance
          Another thing I learned is that Cowpuncher (demolished years ago) was identical to Cannonball; i.e. it had just a single basement level, rather than a
          Message 4 of 16 , Jan 29, 2010
          • 0 Attachment
            Another thing I learned is that Cowpuncher (demolished years ago) was
            identical to Cannonball; i.e. it had just a single basement level, rather
            than a relatively large underground bunker like Cartwheel and Corkscrew.

            Albert


            >-----Original Message-----
            >From: Albert LaFrance [mailto:albert.lafrance@...]
            >Sent: Wednesday, January 27, 2010 11:57 PM
            >To: 'coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com'
            >Subject: Cylindrical-tower White House emergency sites
            >
            >A recent visitor to my web site had worked at one of these
            >facilities. He advised that, as far as he knows, there were
            >seven sites on the network:
            >
            >1. Camp David
            >2. Cannonball (Mercersburg Pa.)
            >3. Cowpuncher (Martinsburg WV.)
            >4. Crystal (Winchester Va.)
            >5. Cartwheel (DC)
            >6. Cadre (Site R)
            >7. Corkscrew (Boonsboro Md.)
            >
            >Note the Cadre and Cowpuncher callsigns, which were new to me.
            >He also confirmed that there was a buried cable between
            >Cannonball and the AT&T Project Office (Hagerstown No. 2) on
            >nearby Hearthstone Mountain.
            >
            >He said that Cannonball had direct microwave shots to Camp
            >David, Corkscrew and Cowpuncher.
            >
            >Albert
          • Jeff Cole
            ... Is there any information as to where it used to be located? I live in the area, so, am interested to see where it might have been located. Jeff -- It s not
            Message 5 of 16 , Jan 29, 2010
            • 0 Attachment
              On Fri, Jan 29, 2010 at 11:56:32PM -0500, Albert LaFrance wrote:
              > Another thing I learned is that Cowpuncher (demolished years ago) was
              > identical to Cannonball; i.e. it had just a single basement level, rather
              > than a relatively large underground bunker like Cartwheel and Corkscrew.

              Is there any information as to where it used to be located? I live in the area, so, am interested to see where it might have been located.

              Jeff

              --
              It's not working because: Computer room being moved. Our systems are down for the weekend.
            • Albert LaFrance
              I m told it was on a peak called Roundtop, west of Martinsburg, adjacent to a fire lookout tower (also demolished). I visited the location some years ago and
              Message 6 of 16 , Jan 29, 2010
              • 0 Attachment
                I'm told it was on a peak called Roundtop, west of Martinsburg, adjacent to
                a fire lookout tower (also demolished). I visited the location some years
                ago and there was no trace of either structure; just a cleared area.
                See http://www.mountainzone.com/mountains/detail.asp?fid=4021356

                Albert


                _____

                From: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com [mailto:coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com] On
                Behalf Of Jeff Cole
                Sent: Saturday, January 30, 2010 12:02 AM
                To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [coldwarcomms] RE: Cylindrical-tower White House emergency
                sites




                On Fri, Jan 29, 2010 at 11:56:32PM -0500, Albert LaFrance wrote:
                > Another thing I learned is that Cowpuncher (demolished years ago) was
                > identical to Cannonball; i.e. it had just a single basement level, rather
                > than a relatively large underground bunker like Cartwheel and Corkscrew.

                Is there any information as to where it used to be located? I live in the
                area, so, am interested to see where it might have been located.

                Jeff

                --
                It's not working because: Computer room being moved. Our systems are down
                for the weekend.






                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • OZOB99
                ... I noticed that, & suspect he may have been referring to the Greenbriar, assuming it was for POTUS. The WHACA he refers to was actually WHASA(White House
                Message 7 of 16 , Jan 30, 2010
                • 0 Attachment
                  --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "Albert LaFrance" <albert.lafrance@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Thanks - I hadn't looked at that site
                  > (http://inyourface.info/bio/MtWx.shtml) in quite a while.
                  >
                  > Two things I found especially interesting were: (1) the "alternate White
                  > House" is no longer located at Mount Weather, and (2) that another alternate
                  > was under construction during the time he was assigned to Mt. Weather. He
                  > began working there in 1959.
                  >
                  > Albert

                  I noticed that, & suspect he may have been referring to the Greenbriar, assuming it was for POTUS.

                  The WHACA he refers to was actually WHASA(White House Army Signal Agency)at that time; and I think the crypto training at Naval Security Agency(or group)may have been the NSA, National Security Agency,a term not used much at that time.
                • paul125a
                  I m wondering about his statement that he was running 3,000 watts on 20 meters. What was the legal limit in those days?
                  Message 8 of 16 , Jan 30, 2010
                  • 0 Attachment
                    I'm wondering about his statement that he was running 3,000 watts on 20 meters. What was the legal limit in those days?

                    --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "OZOB99" <ozob99@...> wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "Albert LaFrance" <albert.lafrance@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Thanks - I hadn't looked at that site
                    > > (http://inyourface.info/bio/MtWx.shtml) in quite a while.
                    > >
                    > > Two things I found especially interesting were: (1) the "alternate White
                    > > House" is no longer located at Mount Weather, and (2) that another alternate
                    > > was under construction during the time he was assigned to Mt. Weather. He
                    > > began working there in 1959.
                    > >
                    > > Albert
                    >
                  • Runkle, George W IV SGT NG NG NGB
                    I m wondering about his statement that he was running 3,000 watts on 20 meters. What was the legal limit in those days? This reminds me of a statement I had
                    Message 9 of 16 , Jan 30, 2010
                    • 0 Attachment
                      "I'm wondering about his statement that he was running 3,000 watts on 20 meters. What was the legal limit in those days?"

                      This reminds me of a statement I had read in a book that I have been wondering about for a long time. Apparently, an eccentric pharmacist who lived in Mexico in the 1920s built a radio station to broadcast advertisements for his personal version of a Viagara-like drug. According to the book, the radio station was strong enough that it could be received in any part of the United States.

                      Is this urban legend, or was it practical in the 1920s to build an AM transmitter that broadcast to the entire continental US?

                      George
                    • OZOB99
                      ... I believe 1KW, but for gov t applications i m sure Uncle Charlie looked the other way. ... These stations were just over the line in Mexico, running up to
                      Message 10 of 16 , Jan 30, 2010
                      • 0 Attachment
                        --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "Runkle, George W IV SGT NG NG NGB" <george.runkleiv@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > "I'm wondering about his statement that he was running 3,000 watts on 20 meters. What was the legal limit in those days?"

                        I believe 1KW, but for gov't applications i'm sure Uncle Charlie looked the other way.

                        >
                        > This reminds me of a statement I had read in a book that I have been wondering about for a long time. Apparently, an eccentric pharmacist who lived in Mexico in the 1920s built a radio station to broadcast advertisements for his personal version of a Viagara-like drug. According to the book, the radio station was strong enough that it could be received in any part of the United States.
                        >
                        > Is this urban legend, or was it practical in the 1920s to build an AM transmitter that broadcast to the entire continental US?

                        These stations were just over the line in Mexico, running up to 500KW I think..the Dr was the Goat Gland quack...the famous Carter family of country music also broadcast from one of these stations.


                        >
                      • Lou Novacheck
                        Dunno if it s still that way, but Mexico formerly had no restrictions on strength of signals. Consequently, there were about a dozen high-wattage stations all
                        Message 11 of 16 , Jan 30, 2010
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Dunno if it's still that way, but Mexico formerly had no restrictions on
                          strength of signals. Consequently, there were about a dozen high-wattage
                          stations all along the border, and their ads constituted every sort of wacko
                          meds, religion, and propaganda imaginable. This was where the "Send me ten
                          dollars and all your problems will be solved" proselytizers polished their
                          rhetoric.

                          And yes, they did cover most if not all the US even up into Canada, esp at
                          night after the Heaviside Layer rose. (Do they still call it that?)

                          Lou

                          On Sat, Jan 30, 2010 at 12:59 PM, Runkle, George W IV SGT NG NG NGB <
                          george.runkleiv@...> wrote:

                          >
                          >
                          > "I'm wondering about his statement that he was running 3,000 watts on 20
                          > meters. What was the legal limit in those days?"
                          >
                          > This reminds me of a statement I had read in a book that I have been
                          > wondering about for a long time. Apparently, an eccentric pharmacist who
                          > lived in Mexico in the 1920s built a radio station to broadcast
                          > advertisements for his personal version of a Viagara-like drug. According to
                          > the book, the radio station was strong enough that it could be received in
                          > any part of the United States.
                          >
                          > Is this urban legend, or was it practical in the 1920s to build an AM
                          > transmitter that broadcast to the entire continental US?
                          >
                          > George
                          >
                          >
                          >



                          --
                          An American taxpayer voting for Barack Obama is like a chicken voting for
                          Colonel Sanders.
                          A � Bud Gregg, State Farm Insurance agent

                          "Reader, suppose you were an idiot. And suppose you were a member of
                          Congress. But I repeat myself."
                          � Mark Twain

                          How much difference is there between an Obama nation and an abomination?
                          � Yours truly

                          Looking for the best coverage of American music? Subscribe to Elmore
                          magazine at www.ElmoreMagazine.com

                          Be sure to check out http://blogcritics.org/ for the best and the most
                          diverse comments and reviews on every subject imaginable.


                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • rahwayflynn
                          ... http://www.ominous-valve.com/xerf.html
                          Message 12 of 16 , Jan 30, 2010
                          • 0 Attachment
                            --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "Runkle, George W IV SGT NG NG NGB" <george.runkleiv@...> wrote:
                            >
                            >
                            > This reminds me of a statement I had read in a book that I have been wondering about for a long time. Apparently, an eccentric pharmacist who lived in Mexico in the 1920s built a radio station to broadcast advertisements for his personal version of a Viagara-like drug. According to the book, the radio station was strong enough that it could be received in any part of the United States.
                            >
                            > Is this urban legend, or was it practical in the 1920s to build an AM transmitter that broadcast to the entire continental US?

                            http://www.ominous-valve.com/xerf.html
                          • Sheldon Daitch
                            George,   a lot more truth than one might imagine.   You might say Brinkley may have had a lot to do with the success of Continental Electronics, the Dallas
                            Message 13 of 16 , Jan 30, 2010
                            • 0 Attachment
                              George,
                               
                              a lot more truth than one might imagine.
                               
                              You might say Brinkley may have had a lot to do with
                              the success of Continental Electronics, the Dallas transmitter
                              manufacturer.
                               
                              James Weldon and high power broadcasting were
                              linked for many, many years.

                              see:
                               
                              http://www.rwonline.com/article/9882
                               
                              for the Brinkley tie-in.
                               
                              See:
                               
                              http://www.oldradio.com/archives/hardware/CE/317.htm
                               
                              for a comment regarding XERF.
                               
                              A fair number of hits come up on Weldon and Continental.
                               
                              By the way, Wolfman Jack wrote an interesting book "HAVE MERCY"
                              about his radio days, including quite a bit re the Mexico days.
                               
                              Sheldon
                               

                              --- On Sat, 1/30/10, Runkle, George W IV SGT NG NG NGB <george.runkleiv@...> wrote:


                              From: Runkle, George W IV SGT NG NG NGB <george.runkleiv@...>
                              Subject: Re: [coldwarcomms] Re: Cylindrical-tower White House emergency sites
                              To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
                              Date: Saturday, January 30, 2010, 8:59 PM


                               



                              "I'm wondering about his statement that he was running 3,000 watts on 20 meters. What was the legal limit in those days?"

                              This reminds me of a statement I had read in a book that I have been wondering about for a long time. Apparently, an eccentric pharmacist who lived in Mexico in the 1920s built a radio station to broadcast advertisements for his personal version of a Viagara-like drug. According to the book, the radio station was strong enough that it could be received in any part of the United States.

                              Is this urban legend, or was it practical in the 1920s to build an AM transmitter that broadcast to the entire continental US?

                              George










                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • Sam Etler
                              ... There s also an interesting book by Gene Fowler and Bill Crawford called Border Radio: Quacks, Yodelers, Pitchmen, Psychics, and Other Amazing Broadcasters
                              Message 14 of 16 , Jan 30, 2010
                              • 0 Attachment
                                > By the way, Wolfman Jack wrote an interesting book "HAVE MERCY"
                                > about his radio days, including quite a bit re the Mexico days.

                                There's also an interesting book by Gene Fowler and Bill Crawford called
                                Border Radio: Quacks, Yodelers, Pitchmen, Psychics, and Other Amazing
                                Broadcasters of the American Airwaves that I found interesting. It's
                                impressive just how little regulation there was pre-FCC and especially
                                pre-FRC.

                                sam
                              • Michael St. Angelo
                                That was Doctor Brinkley and his Goat Gland operation. Mike N2MS ... From: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
                                Message 15 of 16 , Jan 30, 2010
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  That was Doctor Brinkley and his Goat Gland operation.

                                  <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_R._Brinkley>

                                  Mike N2MS

                                  -----Original Message-----
                                  From: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com [mailto:coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com] On
                                  Behalf Of OZOB99
                                  Sent: Saturday, January 30, 2010 1:06 PM
                                  To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
                                  Subject: [coldwarcomms] Re: Cylindrical-tower White House emergency sites



                                  >
                                  > This reminds me of a statement I had read in a book that I have been
                                  wondering about for a long time. Apparently, an eccentric pharmacist who
                                  lived in Mexico in the 1920s built a radio station to broadcast
                                  advertisements for his personal version of a Viagara-like drug. According
                                  to the book, the radio station was strong enough that it could be received
                                  in any part of the United States.
                                  >
                                  > Is this urban legend, or was it practical in the 1920s to build an AM
                                  transmitter that broadcast to the entire continental US?
                                • taskforceleader
                                  Albert, Have you ever mapped the locations and microwave routes for these locations? Also ever speculated on the buried cable routes? M
                                  Message 16 of 16 , Feb 1 8:10 AM
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    Albert,

                                    Have you ever mapped the locations and microwave routes for these locations? Also ever speculated on the buried cable routes?

                                    M


                                    --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "Albert LaFrance" <albert.lafrance@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > A recent visitor to my web site had worked at one of these facilities. He
                                    > advised that, as far as he knows, there were seven sites on the network:
                                    >
                                    > 1. Camp David
                                    > 2. Cannonball (Mercersburg Pa.)
                                    > 3. Cowpuncher (Martinsburg WV.)
                                    > 4. Crystal (Winchester Va.)
                                    > 5. Cartwheel (DC)
                                    > 6. Cadre (Site R)
                                    > 7. Corkscrew (Boonsboro Md.)
                                    >
                                    > Note the Cadre and Cowpuncher callsigns, which were new to me. He also
                                    > confirmed that there was a buried cable between Cannonball and the AT&T
                                    > Project Office (Hagerstown No. 2) on nearby Hearthstone Mountain.
                                    >
                                    > He said that Cannonball had direct microwave shots to Camp David, Corkscrew
                                    > and Cowpuncher.
                                    >
                                    > Albert
                                    >
                                  Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.