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Re[2]: [coldwarcomms] Secrecy of Communications

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  • John R. Myers
    Interesting. SP Communications Company required a signed acknowledgement annually, but the practice fell by the wayside after the GTE acquisition. Jack Myers
    Message 1 of 9 , Jan 6, 2010
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      Interesting. SP Communications Company required a signed acknowledgement annually, but the practice
      fell by the wayside after the GTE acquisition.

      Jack Myers

      *********** REPLY SEPARATOR ***********

      On 1/4/2010 at 10:29 PM Tim Fox wrote:

      Hi All -------------- and it wasn't just in the Bell System. When I was with General Telephone (soon to become GTE) in 1971 - '75, it was a semi-annual event to be re-taught about Secrecy of Communications. And the once a year we were required to sign a form indicating we had read, understood, and agreed to comply with the Policy. Violation was cause for termination.

      Of course that was back in the days when there was loyalty between the employees and the employer.

      Tim Fox

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Albert LaFrance
      To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tuesday, December 29, 2009 10:27 PM
      Subject: RE: [coldwarcomms] Secrecy of Communications

      Somewhere I have a Bell System employees' handbook on that very topic which
      I've been meaning to scan; in fact I think the actual title is "Secrecy of
      Communications".

      Albert

      _____

      From: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com [mailto:coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com] On
      Behalf Of OZOB99
      Sent: Tuesday, December 29, 2009 9:33 PM
      To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [coldwarcomms] Secrecy of Communications

      During the Cold War AT&T offices serving the military and federal agencies
      accumulated a lot of teletype paper/tape from trouble shooting
      circuits,including some encrypted copy.This was placed in a locked container
      & had to be safely disposed of, often daily in large CO's. In addition to
      record comms copy,circuit layout records of all types of services were
      placed in these containers for burning or pulping to protect the comms
      content and customer information of all circuits, commercial and government.

      During the 1950's in Norfolk, the junior employee was assigned to carry a
      large bag of copy/documents down to the basement every morning and hand feed
      a small incinerator;years later this was carried to a chemical pulping
      facility when it became available. I'd guess pulping was always done at Wash
      1 due to the volume.

      What was heard on voice circuits of course was to stay in the headset.

      The need to monitor circuits in trouble made Secrecy of Communications was a
      big issue from day one at Long Lines, with periodic reminders of Federal &
      FCC statutes, as well as Company Policy(later Code of Conduct).

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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    • blitz716
      Haha...we called it dumpster diving. Most phone phreaks started that way.
      Message 2 of 9 , Nov 21, 2011
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        Haha...we called it dumpster diving. Most phone phreaks started that way.

        michael wrote:
        > Back in the 50s and 60s the garbage cans behind phone companies were a
        > goldmine of information for us teen-aged electronics geeks. The grab bag
        > of goodies, both electrical and textual, always was a great treasure hunt,
        > we even dragged home several model 15 teletypes that found service copying
        > the news broadcasts from the shortwave bands, those garbage bins were
        > instrumental in launching several lifetime careers in the technical field.
        >
        > Michael D
        >
        > On Wed, Nov 23, 2011 at 8:10 AM, OZOB99 <ozob99@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        >> **
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >> --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "OZOB99" <ozob99@...> wrote:
        >>
        >>> During the Cold War AT&T offices serving the military and federal
        >>>
        >> agencies accumulated a lot of teletype paper/tape from trouble shooting
        >> circuits,including some encrypted copy.This was placed in a locked
        >> container & had to be safely disposed of, often daily in large CO's. In
        >> addition to record comms copy,circuit layout records of all types of
        >> services were placed in these containers for burning or pulping to protect
        >> the comms content and customer information of all circuits, commercial and
        >> government.
        >>
        >>> During the 1950's in Norfolk, the junior employee was assigned to carry
        >>>
        >> a large bag of copy/documents down to the basement every morning and hand
        >> feed a small incinerator;years later this was carried to a chemical pulping
        >> facility when it became available. I'd guess pulping was always done at
        >> Wash 1 due to the volume.
        >>
        >>> What was heard on voice circuits of course was to stay in the headset.
        >>>
        >>> The need to monitor circuits in trouble made Secrecy of Communications
        >>>
        >> was a big issue from day one at Long Lines, with periodic reminders of
        >> Federal & FCC statutes, as well as Company Policy(later Code of Conduct).
        >>
        >> One of the company policy documents was the 1950's Long Lines Plant
        >> Practice 100, AKA Plant Routine 100, which included a lot of "do's &
        >> don'ts".
        >>
        >> This would be an interesting read if anyone has a copy & could digitize it.
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • OZOB99
        ... One of the company policy documents was the 1950 s Long Lines Plant Practice 100, AKA Plant Routine 100, which included a lot of do s & don ts . This
        Message 3 of 9 , Nov 23, 2011
        • 0 Attachment
          --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "OZOB99" <ozob99@...> wrote:
          >
          > During the Cold War AT&T offices serving the military and federal agencies accumulated a lot of teletype paper/tape from trouble shooting circuits,including some encrypted copy.This was placed in a locked container & had to be safely disposed of, often daily in large CO's. In addition to record comms copy,circuit layout records of all types of services were placed in these containers for burning or pulping to protect the comms content and customer information of all circuits, commercial and government.
          >
          > During the 1950's in Norfolk, the junior employee was assigned to carry a large bag of copy/documents down to the basement every morning and hand feed a small incinerator;years later this was carried to a chemical pulping facility when it became available. I'd guess pulping was always done at Wash 1 due to the volume.
          >
          > What was heard on voice circuits of course was to stay in the headset.
          >
          > The need to monitor circuits in trouble made Secrecy of Communications was a big issue from day one at Long Lines, with periodic reminders of Federal & FCC statutes, as well as Company Policy(later Code of Conduct).


          One of the company policy documents was the 1950's Long Lines Plant Practice 100, AKA Plant Routine 100, which included a lot of "do's & don'ts".

          This would be an interesting read if anyone has a copy & could digitize it.
        • michael
          Back in the 50s and 60s the garbage cans behind phone companies were a goldmine of information for us teen-aged electronics geeks. The grab bag of goodies,
          Message 4 of 9 , Nov 23, 2011
          • 0 Attachment
            Back in the 50s and 60s the garbage cans behind phone companies were a
            goldmine of information for us teen-aged electronics geeks. The grab bag
            of goodies, both electrical and textual, always was a great treasure hunt,
            we even dragged home several model 15 teletypes that found service copying
            the news broadcasts from the shortwave bands, those garbage bins were
            instrumental in launching several lifetime careers in the technical field.

            Michael D

            On Wed, Nov 23, 2011 at 8:10 AM, OZOB99 <ozob99@...> wrote:

            > **
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "OZOB99" <ozob99@...> wrote:
            > >
            > > During the Cold War AT&T offices serving the military and federal
            > agencies accumulated a lot of teletype paper/tape from trouble shooting
            > circuits,including some encrypted copy.This was placed in a locked
            > container & had to be safely disposed of, often daily in large CO's. In
            > addition to record comms copy,circuit layout records of all types of
            > services were placed in these containers for burning or pulping to protect
            > the comms content and customer information of all circuits, commercial and
            > government.
            > >
            > > During the 1950's in Norfolk, the junior employee was assigned to carry
            > a large bag of copy/documents down to the basement every morning and hand
            > feed a small incinerator;years later this was carried to a chemical pulping
            > facility when it became available. I'd guess pulping was always done at
            > Wash 1 due to the volume.
            > >
            > > What was heard on voice circuits of course was to stay in the headset.
            > >
            > > The need to monitor circuits in trouble made Secrecy of Communications
            > was a big issue from day one at Long Lines, with periodic reminders of
            > Federal & FCC statutes, as well as Company Policy(later Code of Conduct).
            >
            > One of the company policy documents was the 1950's Long Lines Plant
            > Practice 100, AKA Plant Routine 100, which included a lot of "do's &
            > don'ts".
            >
            > This would be an interesting read if anyone has a copy & could digitize it.
            >
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Bob Brown - WØNQX
            Same here, I was on a first name basis with our local CO Supervisor. He knew I liked the discarded goodies, and if there was something good he would set it
            Message 5 of 9 , Nov 23, 2011
            • 0 Attachment
              Same here, I was on a first name basis with our local CO Supervisor.
              He knew I liked the discarded goodies, and if there was something good he
              would set it aside and get word to me to come by and pick it up.
              found my share of my of BSPs and stuff.



              --
              Thanks in Advance

              Bob Brown, WØNQX

              Kansas City Metro Area

              http://sm0kenet.net

              http://byrg.net

              http://kcdstar.byrg.net

              http://w0nqx.blogspot.com

              Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?

              Its not how many watts you have,
              its the SIZE of your watts that matter! -- Johnny Marshall, W0JM-SK

              --



              On Mon, Nov 21, 2011 at 15:26, blitz716 <blitz716@...> wrote:

              > Haha...we called it dumpster diving. Most phone phreaks started that way.
              >
              > michael wrote:
              > > Back in the 50s and 60s the garbage cans behind phone companies were a
              > > goldmine of information for us teen-aged electronics geeks. The grab bag
              > > of goodies, both electrical and textual, always was a great treasure
              > hunt,
              > > we even dragged home several model 15 teletypes that found service
              > copying
              > > the news broadcasts from the shortwave bands, those garbage bins were
              > > instrumental in launching several lifetime careers in the technical
              > field.
              > >
              > > Michael D
              > >
              > > On Wed, Nov 23, 2011 at 8:10 AM, OZOB99 <ozob99@...> wrote:
              > >
              > >
              > >> **
              > >>
              > >>
              > >>
              > >>
              > >> --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "OZOB99" <ozob99@...> wrote:
              > >>
              > >>> During the Cold War AT&T offices serving the military and federal
              > >>>
              > >> agencies accumulated a lot of teletype paper/tape from trouble shooting
              > >> circuits,including some encrypted copy.This was placed in a locked
              > >> container & had to be safely disposed of, often daily in large CO's. In
              > >> addition to record comms copy,circuit layout records of all types of
              > >> services were placed in these containers for burning or pulping to
              > protect
              > >> the comms content and customer information of all circuits, commercial
              > and
              > >> government.
              > >>
              > >>> During the 1950's in Norfolk, the junior employee was assigned to carry
              > >>>
              > >> a large bag of copy/documents down to the basement every morning and
              > hand
              > >> feed a small incinerator;years later this was carried to a chemical
              > pulping
              > >> facility when it became available. I'd guess pulping was always done at
              > >> Wash 1 due to the volume.
              > >>
              > >>> What was heard on voice circuits of course was to stay in the headset.
              > >>>
              > >>> The need to monitor circuits in trouble made Secrecy of Communications
              > >>>
              > >> was a big issue from day one at Long Lines, with periodic reminders of
              > >> Federal & FCC statutes, as well as Company Policy(later Code of
              > Conduct).
              > >>
              > >> One of the company policy documents was the 1950's Long Lines Plant
              > >> Practice 100, AKA Plant Routine 100, which included a lot of "do's &
              > >> don'ts".
              > >>
              > >> This would be an interesting read if anyone has a copy & could digitize
              > it.
              > >>
              > >>
              > >>
              > >>
              > >
              > >
              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > ------------------------------------
              > >
              > > Yahoo! Groups Links
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              >
              >
              > ------------------------------------
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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