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AT&T hiring for sensitive locations

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  • OZOB99
    ... Here is a recollection of AT&T hiring at classified/sensitive locations in the 1950 s-60 s. Initial staffing was internal from volunteers with specific
    Message 1 of 8 , Dec 19, 2009
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      --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "quiet_cool1986" <quiet_cool1986@...> wrote:



      > I've often wondered how much of a process it was to get a job at one of
      > those places; I wonder how AT&T recruits people for these jobs and what
      > they look for.



      Here is a recollection of AT&T hiring at classified/sensitive locations in the 1950's-60's. Initial staffing was internal from volunteers with specific skills/training within the Washington Division(DC,MD,VA,WV);however this did'nt fill all the positions so AT&T recruited "off the street" through their employment offices, and placed job ads with the Virginia(& I assume other states) Employment Commission for electronic/technical jobs in "long distance telephone offices".The job location was vague of course, e.g. "the Winchester area", "in the vicinity of Charlottesville",etc.In addition to the standard requirements of: HS diploma with decent grades,some electrical/electronics experience,passing an employment test, physical exam,cursery local background check,& obtaining a 2nd class commercial radiotelephone operators license; they had to obtain a TS clearance with project approval; and pending this would work at other AT&T offices and attend company training schools. It was often months before they actually reported to their hiring location.These employees could not talk to anyone about where they worked or what they did; their cover work location was a P.O. Box in the vicinity, e.g. P.O.Box xxx in Berryville Va for those at Berryville 2/Wash 4; in rare cases where a phone contact had to be given it was a Harrisburg Pa(& other cities) number for this location.

      A 1956/7 Norfolk Va Employment Commission listing was AT&T hiring "transmission men", described as testing and maintaining telephone circuits and equipment in the Winchester Va area.The job location was narrowed down to "around Berryville" if you were offered the job.

      The employment test of the 50's was not just math & technical(like completing a door bell circuit:), but included a little pop culture,e.g. recognizing the Pathe News "crowing rooster", and knowing that Santa Anita had a horse track.

      The "project offices" also hired Building Maintenance Men and telephone operators:

      In the early 1960's AT&T decided to do their own building maintenance in the growing number of AT&T owned L3I & L4 main stations(and the 5 "project offices"). This would limit outside contractors coming into these often sensitive locations and save expense money; and they were sometimes utilized in HVAC work at other locations.

      The operators were ostensibly for the Autovon network and performed that job but this was probably a cover, which i'll speculate on in a another posting.
    • Jason Bourne
      thanks very much! that answered alot of my questions, and i m sure that even with the cold war over , AT&T probly still has a pretty detailed and secure
      Message 2 of 8 , Dec 20, 2009
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        thanks very much! that answered alot of my questions, and i'm sure that even with the cold war "over", AT&T probly still has a pretty detailed and secure process for hiring "project office" workers to this day.

        --- On Sat, 12/19/09, OZOB99 <ozob99@...> wrote:


        From: OZOB99 <ozob99@...>
        Subject: [coldwarcomms] AT&T hiring for sensitive locations
        To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Saturday, December 19, 2009, 4:59 PM


         





        --- In coldwarcomms@ yahoogroups. com, "quiet_cool1986" <quiet_cool1986@ ...> wrote:

        > I've often wondered how much of a process it was to get a job at one of
        > those places; I wonder how AT&T recruits people for these jobs and what
        > they look for.

        Here is a recollection of AT&T hiring at classified/sensitiv e locations in the 1950's-60's. Initial staffing was internal from volunteers with specific skills/training within the Washington Division(DC, MD,VA,WV) ;however this did'nt fill all the positions so AT&T recruited "off the street" through their employment offices, and placed job ads with the Virginia(& I assume other states) Employment Commission for electronic/technica l jobs in "long distance telephone offices".The job location was vague of course, e.g. "the Winchester area", "in the vicinity of Charlottesville" ,etc.In addition to the standard requirements of: HS diploma with decent grades,some electrical/electron ics experience,passing an employment test, physical exam,cursery local background check,& obtaining a 2nd class commercial radiotelephone operators license; they had to obtain a TS clearance with project approval; and pending this would work at other AT&T offices and attend
        company training schools. It was often months before they actually reported to their hiring location.These employees could not talk to anyone about where they worked or what they did; their cover work location was a P.O. Box in the vicinity, e.g. P.O.Box xxx in Berryville Va for those at Berryville 2/Wash 4; in rare cases where a phone contact had to be given it was a Harrisburg Pa(& other cities) number for this location.

        A 1956/7 Norfolk Va Employment Commission listing was AT&T hiring "transmission men", described as testing and maintaining telephone circuits and equipment in the Winchester Va area.The job location was narrowed down to "around Berryville" if you were offered the job.

        The employment test of the 50's was not just math & technical(like completing a door bell circuit:), but included a little pop culture,e.g. recognizing the Pathe News "crowing rooster", and knowing that Santa Anita had a horse track.

        The "project offices" also hired Building Maintenance Men and telephone operators:

        In the early 1960's AT&T decided to do their own building maintenance in the growing number of AT&T owned L3I & L4 main stations(and the 5 "project offices"). This would limit outside contractors coming into these often sensitive locations and save expense money; and they were sometimes utilized in HVAC work at other locations.

        The operators were ostensibly for the Autovon network and performed that job but this was probably a cover, which i'll speculate on in a another posting.











        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • OZOB99
        ... I recently found my form DD48-1 in some files & recalled initially wondering about it as part of my security clearance,thinking what are these
        Message 3 of 8 , Nov 6, 2011
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          --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "OZOB99" <ozob99@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "quiet_cool1986" <quiet_cool1986@> wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          > > I've often wondered how much of a process it was to get a job at one of
          > > those places; I wonder how AT&T recruits people for these jobs and what
          > > they look for.
          >
          >
          >
          > Here is a recollection of AT&T hiring at classified/sensitive locations in the 1950's-60's. Initial staffing was internal from volunteers with specific skills/training within the Washington Division(DC,MD,VA,WV);however this did'nt fill all the positions so AT&T recruited "off the street" through their employment offices, and placed job ads with the Virginia(& I assume other states) Employment Commission for electronic/technical jobs in "long distance telephone offices".The job location was vague of course, e.g. "the Winchester area", "in the vicinity of Charlottesville",etc.In addition to the standard requirements of: HS diploma with decent grades,some electrical/electronics experience,passing an employment test, physical exam,cursery local background check,& obtaining a 2nd class commercial radiotelephone operators license; they had to obtain a TS clearance with project approval; and pending this would work at other AT&T offices and attend company training schools. It was often months before they actually reported to their hiring location.These employees could not talk to anyone about where they worked or what they did; their cover work location was a P.O. Box in the vicinity, e.g. P.O.Box xxx in Berryville Va for those at Berryville 2/Wash 4; in rare cases where a phone contact had to be given it was a Harrisburg Pa(& other cities) number for this location.
          >
          > A 1956/7 Norfolk Va Employment Commission listing was AT&T hiring "transmission men", described as testing and maintaining telephone circuits and equipment in the Winchester Va area.The job location was narrowed down to "around Berryville" if you were offered the job.
          >
          > The employment test of the 50's was not just math & technical(like completing a door bell circuit:), but included a little pop culture,e.g. recognizing the Pathe News "crowing rooster", and knowing that Santa Anita had a horse track.
          >
          > The "project offices" also hired Building Maintenance Men and telephone operators:
          >
          > In the early 1960's AT&T decided to do their own building maintenance in the growing number of AT&T owned L3I & L4 main stations(and the 5 "project offices"). This would limit outside contractors coming into these often sensitive locations and save expense money; and they were sometimes utilized in HVAC work at other locations.
          >
          > The operators were ostensibly for the Autovon network and performed that job but this was probably a cover, which i'll speculate on in a another posting.
          >

          I recently found my form DD48-1 in some files & recalled initially wondering about it as part of my security clearance,thinking what are these organizations I've never heard of!; since I had only been in the Boy Scouts & Civil Air Patrol I did'nt scrutinize the multitude of names carefully, but was cautioned to run it by my family in case any relatives were involved.

          I'm posting the list to aquaint younger members with how the Communist paranoia of the 1950's affected defense contractors; I just looked up a few of the more arcane organizations and found them ranging from amusing to ridiculous:

          www.whs.mil/library/mildoc/AR%20604-45,%2014%20December%201966.pdf
        • james kester
          The guys in the bunkers will certainly assert, they were top men . Special crews only. Only the finest, cream of the crop. Particularly in the cable & radio
          Message 4 of 8 , Nov 6, 2011
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            The guys in the bunkers will certainly assert, they were "top men". Special crews only.
            Only the finest, cream of the crop. Particularly in the cable & radio groups 

            --- On Sun, 11/6/11, OZOB99 <ozob99@...> wrote:


            From: OZOB99 <ozob99@...>
            Subject: [coldwarcomms] Re: AT&T hiring for sensitive locations
            To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Sunday, November 6, 2011, 8:38 AM



             





            --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "OZOB99" <ozob99@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            >
            > --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "quiet_cool1986" <quiet_cool1986@> wrote:
            >
            >
            >
            > > I've often wondered how much of a process it was to get a job at one of
            > > those places; I wonder how AT&T recruits people for these jobs and what
            > > they look for.
            >
            >
            >
            > Here is a recollection of AT&T hiring at classified/sensitive locations in the 1950's-60's. Initial staffing was internal from volunteers with specific skills/training within the Washington Division(DC,MD,VA,WV);however this did'nt fill all the positions so AT&T recruited "off the street" through their employment offices, and placed job ads with the Virginia(& I assume other states) Employment Commission for electronic/technical jobs in "long distance telephone offices".The job location was vague of course, e.g. "the Winchester area", "in the vicinity of Charlottesville",etc.In addition to the standard requirements of: HS diploma with decent grades,some electrical/electronics experience,passing an employment test, physical exam,cursery local background check,& obtaining a 2nd class commercial radiotelephone operators license; they had to obtain a TS clearance with project approval; and pending this would work at other AT&T offices and attend company
            training schools. It was often months before they actually reported to their hiring location.These employees could not talk to anyone about where they worked or what they did; their cover work location was a P.O. Box in the vicinity, e.g. P.O.Box xxx in Berryville Va for those at Berryville 2/Wash 4; in rare cases where a phone contact had to be given it was a Harrisburg Pa(& other cities) number for this location.
            >
            > A 1956/7 Norfolk Va Employment Commission listing was AT&T hiring "transmission men", described as testing and maintaining telephone circuits and equipment in the Winchester Va area.The job location was narrowed down to "around Berryville" if you were offered the job.
            >
            > The employment test of the 50's was not just math & technical(like completing a door bell circuit:), but included a little pop culture,e.g. recognizing the Pathe News "crowing rooster", and knowing that Santa Anita had a horse track.
            >
            > The "project offices" also hired Building Maintenance Men and telephone operators:
            >
            > In the early 1960's AT&T decided to do their own building maintenance in the growing number of AT&T owned L3I & L4 main stations(and the 5 "project offices"). This would limit outside contractors coming into these often sensitive locations and save expense money; and they were sometimes utilized in HVAC work at other locations.
            >
            > The operators were ostensibly for the Autovon network and performed that job but this was probably a cover, which i'll speculate on in a another posting.
            >

            I recently found my form DD48-1 in some files & recalled initially wondering about it as part of my security clearance,thinking what are these organizations I've never heard of!; since I had only been in the Boy Scouts & Civil Air Patrol I did'nt scrutinize the multitude of names carefully, but was cautioned to run it by my family in case any relatives were involved.

            I'm posting the list to aquaint younger members with how the Communist paranoia of the 1950's affected defense contractors; I just looked up a few of the more arcane organizations and found them ranging from amusing to ridiculous:

            www.whs.mil/library/mildoc/AR%20604-45,%2014%20December%201966.pdf








            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Jason Bourne
            Thanks for the reply OZOB99! Would you happen to know what the procedures andactions would have been at the various project offices and switching centers back
            Message 5 of 8 , Nov 6, 2011
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              Thanks for the reply OZOB99! Would you happen to know what the procedures andactions would have been at the various project offices and switching centers back during the cold war if we were attacked? I'm curious what would be a scenario at the hardened sites.

              --- On Sun, 11/6/11, OZOB99 <ozob99@...> wrote:


              From: OZOB99 <ozob99@...>
              Subject: [coldwarcomms] Re: AT&T hiring for sensitive locations
              To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Sunday, November 6, 2011, 1:38 PM



               





              --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "OZOB99" <ozob99@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              >
              > --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "quiet_cool1986" <quiet_cool1986@> wrote:
              >
              >
              >
              > > I've often wondered how much of a process it was to get a job at one of
              > > those places; I wonder how AT&T recruits people for these jobs and what
              > > they look for.
              >
              >
              >
              > Here is a recollection of AT&T hiring at classified/sensitive locations in the 1950's-60's. Initial staffing was internal from volunteers with specific skills/training within the Washington Division(DC,MD,VA,WV);however this did'nt fill all the positions so AT&T recruited "off the street" through their employment offices, and placed job ads with the Virginia(& I assume other states) Employment Commission for electronic/technical jobs in "long distance telephone offices".The job location was vague of course, e.g. "the Winchester area", "in the vicinity of Charlottesville",etc.In addition to the standard requirements of: HS diploma with decent grades,some electrical/electronics experience,passing an employment test, physical exam,cursery local background check,& obtaining a 2nd class commercial radiotelephone operators license; they had to obtain a TS clearance with project approval; and pending this would work at other AT&T offices and attend company
              training schools. It was often months before they actually reported to their hiring location.These employees could not talk to anyone about where they worked or what they did; their cover work location was a P.O. Box in the vicinity, e.g. P.O.Box xxx in Berryville Va for those at Berryville 2/Wash 4; in rare cases where a phone contact had to be given it was a Harrisburg Pa(& other cities) number for this location.
              >
              > A 1956/7 Norfolk Va Employment Commission listing was AT&T hiring "transmission men", described as testing and maintaining telephone circuits and equipment in the Winchester Va area.The job location was narrowed down to "around Berryville" if you were offered the job.
              >
              > The employment test of the 50's was not just math & technical(like completing a door bell circuit:), but included a little pop culture,e.g. recognizing the Pathe News "crowing rooster", and knowing that Santa Anita had a horse track.
              >
              > The "project offices" also hired Building Maintenance Men and telephone operators:
              >
              > In the early 1960's AT&T decided to do their own building maintenance in the growing number of AT&T owned L3I & L4 main stations(and the 5 "project offices"). This would limit outside contractors coming into these often sensitive locations and save expense money; and they were sometimes utilized in HVAC work at other locations.
              >
              > The operators were ostensibly for the Autovon network and performed that job but this was probably a cover, which i'll speculate on in a another posting.
              >

              I recently found my form DD48-1 in some files & recalled initially wondering about it as part of my security clearance,thinking what are these organizations I've never heard of!; since I had only been in the Boy Scouts & Civil Air Patrol I did'nt scrutinize the multitude of names carefully, but was cautioned to run it by my family in case any relatives were involved.

              I'm posting the list to aquaint younger members with how the Communist paranoia of the 1950's affected defense contractors; I just looked up a few of the more arcane organizations and found them ranging from amusing to ridiculous:

              www.whs.mil/library/mildoc/AR%20604-45,%2014%20December%201966.pdf








              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • OZOB99
              ... Part of an answer to your question is from a post 10 years ago & another more recent: Crisis times are unpredictable at best so employees in bunker
              Message 6 of 8 , Nov 6, 2011
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                --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, Jason Bourne <quiet_cool1986@...> wrote:
                >
                > Thanks for the reply OZOB99! Would you happen to know what the procedures andactions would have been at the various project offices and switching centers back during the cold war if we were attacked? I'm curious what would be a scenario at the hardened sites.
                >
                > --- On Sun, 11/6/11, OZOB99 <ozob99@...> wrote:
                >

                Part of an answer to your question is from a post 10 years ago & another more recent:

                Crisis times are unpredictable at best so employees in bunker locations were advised beforehand they might be locked in at times & for unknown periods of time,they knew the risks and hoped for the best.

                50 years ago Ma Bell was a benevolent mother(although union T shirts at contract time proclaimed her a "Cheap Mother") and employees knew they would be taken care of as much as possible in crisis times; and for those sealed up in customer locations(Mt Weather,Site R,The Greenbriar,Cheyenne Mt) the assumption was the gov't agencies would do the same.

                There was sufficient subsistance supplies for varying periods of time, with arrangements for replacements if possible.The only scenario one could predict is a lotta hard work for long hours & doing things you have never thought of doing, being out of contact with friends & family for an unknown time, etc.

                A VP of the day,Killingsworth,stated in a letter to all of Long Lines
                employess regarding critical gov't circuits(Select Circuits): (paraphrasing)you are expected to do whatever it takes, short of plant destruction or personal injury, to keep these circuits up.


                Like most things in the Bell System, there was a BSP on shelters/bunkers:

                BSP-002-501-909-LL, which I believe is still on Albert's page.

                While the BSP is dated 1971 ,there was a Shelter Management School conducted since the mid 1960's;I had a collegue who attended one at Mt. Kisco,NY in 1964 or 5. Mt Kisco was a partially underground AT&T data center as well as a relocation/emergency operation center for HQ officials in NY & NJ.

                I believe it was 5 days, the group confined in a small space, eating Civil Defense rations & canned water of the day; holding classes on blast effects & fallout, damage control,bunker psychology;managing people in a crisis, etc.
              • Jason Bourne
                Thanks very much OZOB99, I was curious about this kind of stuff, it would be very difficult to not be able to bring family to a hardened project office during
                Message 7 of 8 , Nov 6, 2011
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                  Thanks very much OZOB99, I was curious about this kind of stuff, it would be very difficult to not be able to bring family to a hardened project office during a crisis.
                  --- On Mon, 11/7/11, OZOB99 <ozob99@...> wrote:


                  From: OZOB99 <ozob99@...>
                  Subject: [coldwarcomms] Re: AT&T hiring for sensitive locations
                  To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Monday, November 7, 2011, 2:05 AM



                   





                  --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, Jason Bourne <quiet_cool1986@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Thanks for the reply OZOB99! Would you happen to know what the procedures andactions would have been at the various project offices and switching centers back during the cold war if we were attacked? I'm curious what would be a scenario at the hardened sites.
                  >
                  > --- On Sun, 11/6/11, OZOB99 <ozob99@...> wrote:
                  >

                  Part of an answer to your question is from a post 10 years ago & another more recent:

                  Crisis times are unpredictable at best so employees in bunker locations were advised beforehand they might be locked in at times & for unknown periods of time,they knew the risks and hoped for the best.

                  50 years ago Ma Bell was a benevolent mother(although union T shirts at contract time proclaimed her a "Cheap Mother") and employees knew they would be taken care of as much as possible in crisis times; and for those sealed up in customer locations(Mt Weather,Site R,The Greenbriar,Cheyenne Mt) the assumption was the gov't agencies would do the same.

                  There was sufficient subsistance supplies for varying periods of time, with arrangements for replacements if possible.The only scenario one could predict is a lotta hard work for long hours & doing things you have never thought of doing, being out of contact with friends & family for an unknown time, etc.

                  A VP of the day,Killingsworth,stated in a letter to all of Long Lines
                  employess regarding critical gov't circuits(Select Circuits): (paraphrasing)you are expected to do whatever it takes, short of plant destruction or personal injury, to keep these circuits up.

                  Like most things in the Bell System, there was a BSP on shelters/bunkers:

                  BSP-002-501-909-LL, which I believe is still on Albert's page.

                  While the BSP is dated 1971 ,there was a Shelter Management School conducted since the mid 1960's;I had a collegue who attended one at Mt. Kisco,NY in 1964 or 5. Mt Kisco was a partially underground AT&T data center as well as a relocation/emergency operation center for HQ officials in NY & NJ.

                  I believe it was 5 days, the group confined in a small space, eating Civil Defense rations & canned water of the day; holding classes on blast effects & fallout, damage control,bunker psychology;managing people in a crisis, etc.








                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • james kester
                  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yoy4_h7Pb3M   I forgot to include this short video in my bunker hiring comment.....   ... From: Jason Bourne
                  Message 8 of 8 , Nov 7, 2011
                  • 0 Attachment
                    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yoy4_h7Pb3M
                     
                    I forgot to include this short video in my bunker hiring comment.....
                     

                    --- On Sun, 11/6/11, Jason Bourne <quiet_cool1986@...> wrote:


                    From: Jason Bourne <quiet_cool1986@...>
                    Subject: Re: [coldwarcomms] Re: AT&T hiring for sensitive locations
                    To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
                    Date: Sunday, November 6, 2011, 3:23 PM



                     



                    Thanks for the reply OZOB99! Would you happen to know what the procedures andactions would have been at the various project offices and switching centers back during the cold war if we were attacked? I'm curious what would be a scenario at the hardened sites.

                    --- On Sun, 11/6/11, OZOB99 <ozob99@...> wrote:

                    From: OZOB99 <ozob99@...>
                    Subject: [coldwarcomms] Re: AT&T hiring for sensitive locations
                    To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
                    Date: Sunday, November 6, 2011, 1:38 PM

                     

                    --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "OZOB99" <ozob99@...> wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "quiet_cool1986" <quiet_cool1986@> wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > > I've often wondered how much of a process it was to get a job at one of
                    > > those places; I wonder how AT&T recruits people for these jobs and what
                    > > they look for.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Here is a recollection of AT&T hiring at classified/sensitive locations in the 1950's-60's. Initial staffing was internal from volunteers with specific skills/training within the Washington Division(DC,MD,VA,WV);however this did'nt fill all the positions so AT&T recruited "off the street" through their employment offices, and placed job ads with the Virginia(& I assume other states) Employment Commission for electronic/technical jobs in "long distance telephone offices".The job location was vague of course, e.g. "the Winchester area", "in the vicinity of Charlottesville",etc.In addition to the standard requirements of: HS diploma with decent grades,some electrical/electronics experience,passing an employment test, physical exam,cursery local background check,& obtaining a 2nd class commercial radiotelephone operators license; they had to obtain a TS clearance with project approval; and pending this would work at other AT&T offices and attend company
                    training schools. It was often months before they actually reported to their hiring location.These employees could not talk to anyone about where they worked or what they did; their cover work location was a P.O. Box in the vicinity, e.g. P.O.Box xxx in Berryville Va for those at Berryville 2/Wash 4; in rare cases where a phone contact had to be given it was a Harrisburg Pa(& other cities) number for this location.
                    >
                    > A 1956/7 Norfolk Va Employment Commission listing was AT&T hiring "transmission men", described as testing and maintaining telephone circuits and equipment in the Winchester Va area.The job location was narrowed down to "around Berryville" if you were offered the job.
                    >
                    > The employment test of the 50's was not just math & technical(like completing a door bell circuit:), but included a little pop culture,e.g. recognizing the Pathe News "crowing rooster", and knowing that Santa Anita had a horse track.
                    >
                    > The "project offices" also hired Building Maintenance Men and telephone operators:
                    >
                    > In the early 1960's AT&T decided to do their own building maintenance in the growing number of AT&T owned L3I & L4 main stations(and the 5 "project offices"). This would limit outside contractors coming into these often sensitive locations and save expense money; and they were sometimes utilized in HVAC work at other locations.
                    >
                    > The operators were ostensibly for the Autovon network and performed that job but this was probably a cover, which i'll speculate on in a another posting.
                    >

                    I recently found my form DD48-1 in some files & recalled initially wondering about it as part of my security clearance,thinking what are these organizations I've never heard of!; since I had only been in the Boy Scouts & Civil Air Patrol I did'nt scrutinize the multitude of names carefully, but was cautioned to run it by my family in case any relatives were involved.

                    I'm posting the list to aquaint younger members with how the Communist paranoia of the 1950's affected defense contractors; I just looked up a few of the more arcane organizations and found them ranging from amusing to ridiculous:

                    www.whs.mil/library/mildoc/AR%20604-45,%2014%20December%201966.pdf

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]








                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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