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AT&T Fiber Sabotage in San Jose

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  • jamesbburks
    From the San Jose Mercury News: http://www.mercurynews.com/ci_12119748?nclick_check=1 A day after a saboteur hacked through underground fiber-optic cables
    Message 1 of 12 , Apr 14 3:02 PM
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      From the San Jose Mercury News:
      http://www.mercurynews.com/ci_12119748?nclick_check=1

      A day after a saboteur hacked through underground fiber-optic cables leaving tens of thousands of Silicon Valley residents with no phone, cell phone or Internet service, AT&T fattened its reward Friday to $250,000 as local police and the FBI continued to hunt for the culprit.

      But businesses that suffered financially because of the outages cannot claim any refunds, and Verizon customers in South County shouldn't expect any money for the inconvenience.

      San Jose police reported receiving about 10 tips, and San Carlos police confirmed they are examining video surveillance of a major intersection near one of the four locations where AT&T's underground fiber-optic cables were sliced early Thursday morning.

      The major damage that shut down phone service in parts of three counties throughout the day Thursday came from a manhole in South San Jose at Monterey Highway and Blossom Hill Road. Authorities believe the culprit, or culprits, climbed down manholes in the early-morning darkness Thursday, forcing AT&T workers to drive from manhole to manhole searching for severed cable. All service was restored by 12:15 a.m. Friday.

      AT&T spokesman John Britton said, "$250,000 is a lot of money, and it shows we're going to have zero tolerance for criminals that attack our network and adversely affect our customers." Britton noted previous rewards have generally been no more than about $15,000. Previous assaults on phone service that have damaged copper cables have been more likely to affect 800 or 1,000 customers.

      "In this case there was a deliberate act of destruction," Britton said. "This malicious criminal act was targeted at our fiber network, which impacts thousands and thousands of customers in multiple communities."

      Three counties hit

      The sabotage led to widespread disruption of phone service — including tens of thousands of land lines, an undetermined number of cell phones, Internet access and 911 emergency service — in southern Santa Clara County as well as in Santa Cruz and San Benito counties. The magnitude of the disruption has shaken the multiple communication giants reliant upon the damaged fiber-optic cables, and vexed local officials, who spent Thursday fearful that emergency calls would not get through to paramedics and other first responders. Santa Clara County called a local state of emergency, but worst-case scenarios were successfully avoided through the use of ham radios, door-to-door checks and extra-vigilant patrols.

      Authorities now consider the vandalism a coordinated act of sabotage that took place at about 1:30 a.m. Thursday. San Jose and San Carlos police are joined in their investigation by the Santa Clara County Sheriff's Office and monitors with the FBI. The investigation also includes members of AT&T's security force, a handful of trained investigators working for the company.

      Authorities said Friday that evidence collection was complete, but would not elaborate on what exactly they are examining or whether new security measures are in place to prevent similar acts of destruction.

      San Carlos Police Commander Rich Cinfio said his department expected by early next week to know more about whether videotape from the intersection at Britton Avenue and Industrial Road would be helpful to the investigation.

      In the wake of the outage, AT&T officials said customers can request credits for the day of lost service if they call the company, although businesses that suffered due to lack of communication should not expect to recoup their losses.

      The 52,000 Verizon customers in Gilroy and Morgan Hill who lost landline service are ineligible for refunds, because the company only offers credits for an outage that lasts more than 24 hours. Spokesman Jonathan Davies said service began being restored Thursday morning within hours of the interrupted service, and was completed by 1 a.m. Friday.

      Davies offered apologies to customers, adding that the company is unaware of any serious emergency resulting from the lack of phone communication.

      Repairs to the damaged cable lines involved crews working eight feet underground in the Monterey Highway manhole in South San Jose. Cut cable lines also had to be repaired at two other nearby locations, after service interruptions affected several hundred customers in the Hellyer, Silver Creek Valley and Tures neighborhoods.

      Cables severed in San Carlos did not result in a disruption of service, but authorities consider all four incidents related.

      Reward offered

      The damage was so extensive that AT&T, whose cable lines leased to Verizon were cut, initially offered a $100,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person or people responsible for what is considered a deliberate act. Britton said that amount was the largest reward in his 17 years with the company.

      He added that police now have their eye on manholes and other infrastructure.

      "Everybody is watchful, and seeing $250,000 reward, we really, really, really want leads on this," Britton said. "It's unacceptable what happened yesterday."

      End of original article. My personal paranoid ravings follow:

      Was this the work of someone with a grudge against AT&T, Verizon or Google, or the capability testing by Chinese, Russian or North Korean agents?

      It's nothing like this:
      http://www.porticus.org/bell/longlines-expdam.html
      but still worrisome.
    • Paul Zawada
      Did anyone else catch the irony in the fact that San Carlos was where the Lenkurt Microwave operation was located? Perhaps it was an old Lenkurt microwave
      Message 2 of 12 , Apr 14 7:16 PM
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        Did anyone else catch the irony in the fact that San Carlos was where
        the Lenkurt Microwave operation was located? Perhaps it was an old
        Lenkurt microwave engineer that has been holding a grudge against
        fiber optic technology all of these years... :-) :-) :-)

        --zawada

        On Tue, Apr 14, 2009 at 6:02 PM, jamesbburks <jim.burks@...> wrote:
        > San Jose police reported receiving about 10 tips, and San Carlos police confirmed they are examining video surveillance of a major intersection near one of the four locations where AT&T's underground fiber-optic cables were sliced early Thursday morning.
      • james kester
        He would have to be mighty old? How much is the reward? ... From: Paul Zawada Subject: Re: [coldwarcomms] AT&T Fiber Sabotage in San Jose
        Message 3 of 12 , Apr 15 12:23 PM
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          He would have to be mighty old? How much is the reward?


          --- On Tue, 4/14/09, Paul Zawada <EngineerZ@...> wrote:

          From: Paul Zawada <EngineerZ@...>
          Subject: Re: [coldwarcomms] AT&T Fiber Sabotage in San Jose
          To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Tuesday, April 14, 2009, 10:16 PM

















          Did anyone else catch the irony in the fact that San Carlos was where

          the Lenkurt Microwave operation was located? Perhaps it was an old

          Lenkurt microwave engineer that has been holding a grudge against

          fiber optic technology all of these years... :-) :-) :-)



          --zawada



          On Tue, Apr 14, 2009 at 6:02 PM, jamesbburks <jim.burks@comcast. net> wrote:

          > San Jose police reported receiving about 10 tips, and San Carlos police confirmed they are examining video surveillance of a major intersection near one of the four locations where AT&T's underground fiber-optic cables were sliced early Thursday morning.





























          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • hooligan@aol.com
          The underground vault the San Carlos sabotage occurred in is I think only about a half mile away from where the Lenkurt Microwave factory was. As for the
          Message 4 of 12 , Apr 27 1:05 AM
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            The underground vault the San Carlos sabotage occurred in is I think only
            about a half mile away from where the Lenkurt Microwave factory was.

            As for the suspects, it's pretty damn obvious, if your media source was
            one of the apparently few that were brave enough to mention the
            'coincidence' of the local telco union's dissatisfaction with ongoing labor
            negotiations with the telco & an impending strike.

            The reward is up to $250,000 now.

            In listening to the emergency operations radio comms during the event,
            the couple Verizon techs called to the scene around 5AM first asked the
            police to loan them some handheld radios so they could talk with each other
            while in separate cable vaults. Then they either decided or found out the
            hard way that the VHF walkie-talkies wouldn't provide comms while they were
            down in the manholes. The new request? Satellite phones! The Morgan Hill
            EOC comms person dutifully relayed that request on to the Santa Clara County
            EOC person as should be done, but I don't think either one of them was
            bright enough to realize that the "sat phones" probably wouldn't work too well
            in cable vaults, since they then had a brief conversation about how many
            sat phones they had available. But clearly it didn't dawn on the Verizon
            techs who made the request.

            It seems like it took this event for a lot of the public & media to
            comprehend that a lot of the communications infrastructure the federal gov't
            labels as being "critical infrastructure" needing protection really is
            critical infrastructure that needs protection. The resulting media
            sensationalism & locals freaking out because their internet/phones/credit cards didn't
            work probably took the telco goons who did the sabotage by surprise too.


            Tim


            In a message dated 4/14/2009 7:17:07 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
            EngineerZ@... writes:





            Did anyone else catch the irony in the fact that San Carlos was where
            the Lenkurt Microwave operation was located? Perhaps it was an old
            Lenkurt microwave engineer that has been holding a grudge against
            fiber optic technology all of these years... :-) :-) :-)

            --zawada

            On Tue, Apr 14, 2009 at 6:02 PM, jamesbburks <_jim.burks@..._
            (mailto:jim.burks@...) > wrote:
            > San Jose police reported receiving about 10 tips, and San Carlos police
            confirmed they are examining video surveillance of a major intersection
            near one of the four locations where AT&T's underground fiber-optic cables
            were sliced early Thursday morning.




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            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • lasertower
            Is the nationwide UHF ATT common channel still in use? Or did they migrate to 800? If it is in use, is it common between operating comapnies? For obvious
            Message 5 of 12 , Apr 27 5:32 AM
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              Is the nationwide UHF ATT common channel still in use? Or did they migrate to 800? If it is in use, is it common between operating comapnies? For obvious reasons I'm not going to post the frequency. I have not had the scanner on in a year of two.

              Steve
            • bd6xray
              451.325 MHz was formerly a Telephone Maintenance Radio Service only frequency, but is now available to all kinds of industrial/business users, who have
              Message 6 of 12 , Apr 27 6:28 AM
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                451.325 MHz was formerly a 'Telephone Maintenance Radio Service' only frequency, but is now available to all kinds of industrial/business users, who have repopulated it extensively. AT&T Corp has only one active base license left, KXJ521 in Bedminster NJ, and one mobile license KE5023.

                Al Hajny

                --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "lasertower" <osr@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                >
                > Is the nationwide UHF ATT common channel still in use? Or did they migrate to 800? If it is in use, is it common between operating comapnies? For obvious reasons I'm not going to post the frequency. I have not had the scanner on in a year of two.
                >
                > Steve
                >
              • Blake Bowers
                TMRS is only barely active anymore. There were actually 6 common UHF channels licensed nationwide, 451.3000, 3250, 3500, 4000, 4500, 5000. Also under the same
                Message 7 of 12 , Apr 27 6:48 AM
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                  TMRS is only barely active anymore.

                  There were actually 6 common UHF channels
                  licensed nationwide, 451.3000, 3250, 3500, 4000, 4500, 5000.

                  Also under the same nationwide license was two VHF
                  frequencies, 151.985, and 158.340 often used in a repeater
                  configuration like the UHF.

                  Finally, licensed nationwide was two low band frequencies,
                  35.16 and 43.16. The callsign was KE5023, and all were licensed
                  as mobile only.

                  There was also used in a few locations 451.575 and 451.500,
                  although they fell under other licenses.

                  KE5023 is still active. Somewhere along the line the special
                  condition was dropped - which if I remember correctly was just
                  a "play nice" condition, as these frequencies were NOT exclusive
                  to AT&T, but eligible to be licensed to any telco. This is back
                  when every service had a block of frequencies, not the basic
                  free for all that it is now.

                  Now, just because its still active with the FCC, does not mean
                  it gets used a lot. Most - I would say 99% of the repeaters and
                  base stations were shut down, many being RIP'd at tower sites
                  that later were sold. Lots of the stations found their way into
                  HAM hands. Almost all of AT&T in 2004 were told to ship their
                  radios back to Conyers, where they were disposed of. A good
                  many portables were kept out in the field, but maintenance has
                  been minimal at bast.

                  At least two other telco's had very wide coverage system,
                  basically coast to coast, MCI, and IXC. I am not sure what
                  Sprint or Qwest used. Same frequencies.

                  Now, they are mixed use. As an example, in Missouri 451.300 is
                  licensed to over 26 companies, only 3 of which are telcos.

                  I will have some of the repeaters at the Dayton hamfest if
                  anyone really wants one....


                  Don't take your organs to heaven,
                  heaven knows we need them down here!
                  Be an organ donor, sign your donor card today.

                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: "lasertower" <osr@...>
                  To: <coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Monday, April 27, 2009 7:32 AM
                  Subject: [coldwarcomms] Re: AT&T Fiber Sabotage in San Jose


                  >
                  >
                  > Is the nationwide UHF ATT common channel still in use? Or did they
                  > migrate to 800? If it is in use, is it common between operating comapnies?
                  > For obvious reasons I'm not going to post the frequency. I have not had
                  > the scanner on in a year of two.
                  >
                  > Steve
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > ------------------------------------
                  >
                  > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >
                  >
                  >
                • Blake Bowers
                  But KXJ521 is a license for any location CONTINENTAL SOUTH OF LINE A WEST OF LINE C US On a temporary fixed basis. (Temporary meaning up to 1 year). It can
                  Message 8 of 12 , Apr 27 7:03 AM
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                    But KXJ521 is a license for any location "CONTINENTAL SOUTH OF LINE A WEST
                    OF LINE C US"

                    On a temporary fixed basis. (Temporary meaning up to 1 year). It can cover
                    a whole bunch
                    of sites. 8 frequencies. Lots more than just Bedminster.

                    KE5023 is mobiles, anywhere in the US. 16 frequencies. 6207 units.



                    Don't take your organs to heaven,
                    heaven knows we need them down here!
                    Be an organ donor, sign your donor card today.

                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: "bd6xray" <bd6xray@...>
                    To: <coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Monday, April 27, 2009 8:28 AM
                    Subject: [coldwarcomms] Re: AT&T Fiber Sabotage in San Jose


                    > 451.325 MHz was formerly a 'Telephone Maintenance Radio Service' only
                    > frequency, but is now available to all kinds of industrial/business users,
                    > who have repopulated it extensively. AT&T Corp has only one active base
                    > license left, KXJ521 in Bedminster NJ, and one mobile license KE5023.
                    >
                    > Al Hajny
                    >
                    > --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "lasertower" <osr@...> wrote:
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >> Is the nationwide UHF ATT common channel still in use? Or did they
                    >> migrate to 800? If it is in use, is it common between operating
                    >> comapnies? For obvious reasons I'm not going to post the frequency. I
                    >> have not had the scanner on in a year of two.
                    >>
                    >> Steve
                    >>
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > ------------------------------------
                    >
                    > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >
                    >
                    >
                  • Dexter McIntyre W4DEX
                    ... In the Southeast AT&T replaced the UHF radios with satellite phones from American Mobile Satellite. I was told this was a cost saving move ordered by Dr.
                    Message 9 of 12 , Apr 28 3:40 PM
                    • 0 Attachment
                      lasertower wrote:
                      >
                      > Is the nationwide UHF ATT common channel still in use? Or did they migrate to 800? If it is in use, is it common between operating comapnies? For obvious reasons I'm not going to post the frequency. I have not had the scanner on in a year of two.
                      >
                      In the Southeast AT&T replaced the UHF radios with satellite phones from
                      American Mobile Satellite. I was told this was a cost saving move ordered by
                      Dr. Hossein Eslambolchi who had moved into corporate management from Bell Labs.
                      The guy is a brilliant man but personally I think he should have stayed in R&D
                      instead if management.

                      I questioned how this move could possibly save money so I was given some figures
                      on how much it cost to maintain the well working UHF system. The equipment
                      maintenance and routine replacement cost was almost insignificant compared to
                      the cost of the 4 wire facilities to interconnect the repeaters. So I submitted
                      an employee suggestion to replace all the 4 wire circuits with dial up
                      interfaces. Doing so would only add a one time few seconds delay when the alarm
                      center needed to call a mobile. Only a few of the repeaters were used on a
                      regular basis and if needed the connection could have been maintained all day if
                      necessary. The only cost would be the monthly local line plus any long distant
                      charges which mainly would have been in the AT&T network.

                      My suggestion was never acknowledged. When I inquired I was told Dr. Eslambolchi
                      had make the decision to modernize AT&T's mobile maintenance radio system.

                      The cell sat phones were certainly not what the typical cable maintenance guy
                      needed. Being a ham radio nut I easily learned but the cable guys just refused
                      to use them. Within a few years after the sat radios were installed cellular
                      coverage had greatly improved. So cell phones became the primarily mode of
                      mobile communications. I left the company in 1999 and got the pleasure of
                      removing many of the sat phones that was a mistake to start with. And was even
                      paid well to do it :)

                      Dexter
                    • Blake Bowers
                      The sat phones were supposed to be a regional experiment, turns out it was a regional experiment in how to waste money. Like you mention, it became very
                      Message 10 of 12 , Apr 29 8:57 AM
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                        The sat phones were supposed to be a regional experiment, turns out it
                        was a regional experiment in how to waste money.

                        Like you mention, it became very expensive to run the interconnect. Back
                        in the days of having the microwave network, it was not too expensive, but
                        as the cable and microwave facilities were decommissioned, the easy access
                        to orderwires and interconnect went away also.

                        In the microwave days, it was almost every other tower in a chain would
                        have a UHF radio. Cable routes that were long distances away from
                        microwave towers had Rohn SSV towers installed to hold the UHF antenna,
                        such as Paris and Polo Missouri. Even some cable huts such as Millwood MO,
                        nothing more than an L-carrier hut got the SSV towers just for the TMRS
                        system.

                        Many a site we have purchased had the DB antenna on the tower, the MSF5000
                        in the building, and lots of them have had GE Rangr, Spectra's and even some
                        portables laying around. Even some older Motracs with the DTMF add on
                        head.

                        When in Dayton I will have some of the MSF stations for sale, as well as
                        some
                        other Long Lines stuff.

                        Don't take your organs to heaven,
                        heaven knows we need them down here!
                        Be an organ donor, sign your donor card today.

                        ----- Original Message -----
                        From: "Dexter McIntyre W4DEX" <dmcintyre@...>
                        To: <coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com>
                        Sent: Tuesday, April 28, 2009 5:40 PM
                        Subject: Re: [coldwarcomms] Re: AT&T Fiber Sabotage in San Jose


                        > lasertower wrote:
                        >>
                        >> Is the nationwide UHF ATT common channel still in use? Or did they
                        >> migrate to 800? If it is in use, is it common between operating
                        >> comapnies? For obvious reasons I'm not going to post the frequency. I
                        >> have not had the scanner on in a year of two.
                        >>
                        > In the Southeast AT&T replaced the UHF radios with satellite phones from
                        > American Mobile Satellite. I was told this was a cost saving move ordered
                        > by
                        > Dr. Hossein Eslambolchi who had moved into corporate management from Bell
                        > Labs.
                        > The guy is a brilliant man but personally I think he should have stayed in
                        > R&D
                        > instead if management.
                        >
                        > I questioned how this move could possibly save money so I was given some
                        > figures
                        > on how much it cost to maintain the well working UHF system. The
                        > equipment
                        > maintenance and routine replacement cost was almost insignificant compared
                        > to
                        > the cost of the 4 wire facilities to interconnect the repeaters. So I
                        > submitted
                        > an employee suggestion to replace all the 4 wire circuits with dial up
                        > interfaces. Doing so would only add a one time few seconds delay when the
                        > alarm
                        > center needed to call a mobile. Only a few of the repeaters were used on
                        > a
                        > regular basis and if needed the connection could have been maintained all
                        > day if
                        > necessary. The only cost would be the monthly local line plus any long
                        > distant
                        > charges which mainly would have been in the AT&T network.
                        >
                        > My suggestion was never acknowledged. When I inquired I was told Dr.
                        > Eslambolchi
                        > had make the decision to modernize AT&T's mobile maintenance radio system.
                        >
                        > The cell sat phones were certainly not what the typical cable maintenance
                        > guy
                        > needed. Being a ham radio nut I easily learned but the cable guys just
                        > refused
                        > to use them. Within a few years after the sat radios were installed
                        > cellular
                        > coverage had greatly improved. So cell phones became the primarily mode
                        > of
                        > mobile communications. I left the company in 1999 and got the pleasure of
                        > removing many of the sat phones that was a mistake to start with. And was
                        > even
                        > paid well to do it :)
                        >
                        > Dexter
                        >
                        >
                        > ------------------------------------
                        >
                        > Yahoo! Groups Links
                        >
                        >
                        >
                      • Ken Bowles
                        Blake . . . that solves a mystery for me. I m familiar with those three locations and I had assumed that the towers had been added after decommissioning . . .
                        Message 11 of 12 , Apr 29 10:35 AM
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Blake . . . that solves a mystery for me. I'm familiar with those three
                          locations and I had assumed that the towers had been added after
                          decommissioning . . . now I know the truth.

                          Ken in Union MO

                          On Wed, Apr 29, 2009 at 10:57 AM, Blake Bowers <bbowers@...> wrote:

                          >
                          >
                          > The sat phones were supposed to be a regional experiment, turns out it
                          > was a regional experiment in how to waste money.
                          >
                          > Like you mention, it became very expensive to run the interconnect. Back
                          > in the days of having the microwave network, it was not too expensive, but
                          > as the cable and microwave facilities were decommissioned, the easy access
                          > to orderwires and interconnect went away also.
                          >
                          > In the microwave days, it was almost every other tower in a chain would
                          > have a UHF radio. Cable routes that were long distances away from
                          > microwave towers had Rohn SSV towers installed to hold the UHF antenna,
                          > such as Paris and Polo Missouri. Even some cable huts such as Millwood MO,
                          > nothing more than an L-carrier hut got the SSV towers just for the TMRS
                          > system.
                          >
                          > Many a site we have purchased had the DB antenna on the tower, the MSF5000
                          > in the building, and lots of them have had GE Rangr, Spectra's and even
                          > some
                          > portables laying around. Even some older Motracs with the DTMF add on
                          > head.
                          >
                          > When in Dayton I will have some of the MSF stations for sale, as well as
                          > some
                          > other Long Lines stuff.
                          >
                          > Don't take your organs to heaven,
                          > heaven knows we need them down here!
                          > Be an organ donor, sign your donor card today.
                          >
                          > ----- Original Message -----
                          > From: "Dexter McIntyre W4DEX" <dmcintyre@... <dmcintyre%40att.net>>
                          > To: <coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com <coldwarcomms%40yahoogroups.com>>
                          > Sent: Tuesday, April 28, 2009 5:40 PM
                          > Subject: Re: [coldwarcomms] Re: AT&T Fiber Sabotage in San Jose
                          >
                          > > lasertower wrote:
                          > >>
                          > >> Is the nationwide UHF ATT common channel still in use? Or did they
                          > >> migrate to 800? If it is in use, is it common between operating
                          > >> comapnies? For obvious reasons I'm not going to post the frequency. I
                          > >> have not had the scanner on in a year of two.
                          > >>
                          > > In the Southeast AT&T replaced the UHF radios with satellite phones from
                          > > American Mobile Satellite. I was told this was a cost saving move ordered
                          >
                          > > by
                          > > Dr. Hossein Eslambolchi who had moved into corporate management from Bell
                          >
                          > > Labs.
                          > > The guy is a brilliant man but personally I think he should have stayed
                          > in
                          > > R&D
                          > > instead if management.
                          > >
                          > > I questioned how this move could possibly save money so I was given some
                          > > figures
                          > > on how much it cost to maintain the well working UHF system. The
                          > > equipment
                          > > maintenance and routine replacement cost was almost insignificant
                          > compared
                          > > to
                          > > the cost of the 4 wire facilities to interconnect the repeaters. So I
                          > > submitted
                          > > an employee suggestion to replace all the 4 wire circuits with dial up
                          > > interfaces. Doing so would only add a one time few seconds delay when the
                          >
                          > > alarm
                          > > center needed to call a mobile. Only a few of the repeaters were used on
                          > > a
                          > > regular basis and if needed the connection could have been maintained all
                          >
                          > > day if
                          > > necessary. The only cost would be the monthly local line plus any long
                          > > distant
                          > > charges which mainly would have been in the AT&T network.
                          > >
                          > > My suggestion was never acknowledged. When I inquired I was told Dr.
                          > > Eslambolchi
                          > > had make the decision to modernize AT&T's mobile maintenance radio
                          > system.
                          > >
                          > > The cell sat phones were certainly not what the typical cable maintenance
                          >
                          > > guy
                          > > needed. Being a ham radio nut I easily learned but the cable guys just
                          > > refused
                          > > to use them. Within a few years after the sat radios were installed
                          > > cellular
                          > > coverage had greatly improved. So cell phones became the primarily mode
                          > > of
                          > > mobile communications. I left the company in 1999 and got the pleasure of
                          > > removing many of the sat phones that was a mistake to start with. And was
                          >
                          > > even
                          > > paid well to do it :)
                          > >
                          > > Dexter
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > ------------------------------------
                          > >
                          > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          >
                          >
                          >


                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Loyd
                          http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/05/30/AR2009053002114.html?hpid=moreheadlines [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          Message 12 of 12 , May 30, 2009
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