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  • taskforceleader
    The test from my former LA Grand Web Page: This is LSANCA03, 420 S. Grand Ave., originally built in 1961 and raised to seventeen stories (minus tower height)
    Message 1 of 8 , Mar 26, 2009
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      The test from my former LA Grand Web Page:

      This is LSANCA03, 420 S. Grand Ave., originally built in 1961 and raised to seventeen stories (minus tower height) in 1968. The stylized tower design was required by the City Of Los Angeles as a condition of approval of the building's construction. The building with the famous mural (see below) on it was built in 1948, and is LSANCA02, 433 S. Grand Ave. The original 1925 433 S. Olive St. building is LSANCA01, heavily remodeled in 1971 after heavy damage from the Saugus earthquake, which killed three Western Electric installers that were crushed by a collapsing bridge. Together they are collectively known as the "Grand Complex".

      LSANCA02 also has a much smaller "rack" type radio tower its roof, containing mostly old 13 foot Andrew parabolics and other miscellaneous, as well as "cornies". The old radio room, along with the Television Operating Center, Radiotelephone equipment (forerunner of cellular) and Program Operating Center, was on the twelfth floor of this building, directly below the old antenna rack. The radio room was a veritable museum of ancient Western Electric and Collins radio types, along with 1950s GE radiotelephone transmitters and receivers. It was completely wrecked out around 1984, and replaced by digital multiplex equipment, while AT&T tried to play "catch-up" with Sprint.

      GEP

      The twelfth floor also housed the transmitter that linked Mount Wilson with a dedicated N-3 carrier terminal, which was part of the GEP system, called "Echo Fox". The carrier terminal was on the third floor with the rest of the toll N carrier, and was top secret for years. A simple patch cord afforded connectivity to the system, and a technician had to be on duty at that location all the time "Echo Fox" was in service to Air Force 1.

      LSANCA07

      The "Airport" (LSANCA07), Manchester Ave. at LAX.

      LSANCA07, appropriately named "Airport" used to be the Serving Test Center for many of the FAA circuits feeding the Los Angeles International Airport. There was a large scale TN (11 GHz) microwave route linking LA 7 and the "Grand Complex", which provided interconnection with all of the coax cables, as well as the transcontinental microwave routes, out of Grand. An interesting story about this route has to do with the building of the ARCO Towers downtown in the 1970s. On its original location, the south tower would have just blocked the path from Grand to Airport. Negotiations between Pacific Telephone and the developer got the building moved ten feet, so the shot wouldn't be blocked. Many more such negotiations took place as high-rise development continued downtown, until finally, there was no alternatives left. The Crocker Center, now the Well Fargo Center, across the street on Grand Ave., effectively blocked a heavily trafficked TD/TH route to Oat Mountain in the early '80s. All of this traffic was rerouted via L-5E to Sherman Oaks.

      All of the shots out of "Grand" are completely blocked now by high rise development; none of the antennas on the unique tower are functional, and the seventieth floor radio room is vacant. There has been talk for a few years now about dismantling the landmark tower, but to date, nothing has been done.

      LSANCA02 MURAL (Missing photo)


      Front door of LSANCA02, S. Grande Ave. (missing photo)

      This work was commissioned by Pacific Telephone and Telegraph to grace the new entrance to the Grand Complex in 1961. Containing brass sculpture, mosaic tile and various telephone parts including a satellite link made of wall phone hookswitches (added to celebrate "Early Bird" and the launch of Telstar I), it has been part of the Los Angeles "public art" scene ever since. The same artist originally placed large scale non serif letter above the door that spelled out "Pacific Telephone" in metal encasements that contained mosaics of polished crushed quartz, and underneath was spelled out "Part of the Nationwide Bell System" in a streamline-moderne font in cast aluminum. This was done away with around 1987, replaced by a bland, cast aluminum "Pacific Bell" logo with the asterisk key trademark. Polished black and red granite and marble grace the entrance doors. Such were the days of the Bell System, when things were done with permanence and built for the ages. Now, a Butler building suffices for most new buildings! Some recent AT&T sites have even been housed in converted 7-11 store buildings.

      LCXR

      The bulk of the long lines traffic through this office was commercial switched message and private line, although many important government circuits were also carried. Extensive LMX and MMX multi-mastergroup multiplex). 505D plants powered the section towards Mojave to the 14th repeater hut, which was the end of each station's respective power loop.

      This route, as well as all the other L-3 routes built in 1964, were of the "improved" variety. Functionally, they were the same as the early L-3, and many parts were interchangeable. More noticeable changes were to a 12 tube coax which utilized wider diameter tubes, allowing a higher AC voltage potential between center conductor and the shield. This overcame a problem on the LA-El Paso "A" conversion from L-1, in that the narrower diameter tubes were apt to arc over at points nearest the power feed station, due to a potential of about 5.5 KV existing at the Terminal Main Station of a 75 mile long power loop. On the El Paso "A", sulfur hexaflouride gas was used in place of dry nitrogen to charge the cables for about 16 miles out from San Bernardino and Blythe, as well as other power feed stations.

      This dangerous gas had to be used, since it would suppress arcing in the cable, where standard dry nitrogen would not. Another change was from selenium rectifiers in DC power supplies, both at the terminals and in the repeater huts, to silicon. The selenium rectifiers in the "early" L-3s proved to be a real maintenance problem around the close of the '70s, although the older lines were never wholesale converted to the newer types of power supplies. At Los Angeles 2 on the El Paso and Oakland routes, AT&T wholesale changed out every selenium rectifier stack in the terminals, and never had another problem with them until the day the systems were turned down for good.

      Another feature of the "improved" L-3 was the use of the new, solid-state "LMX-2" multiplex in place of the original tube powered and manually regulated LMX-1. This new multiplex provided pilot tone regulation down to every group of 12 channels, where, with LMX-1, pilots had to be manually checked and adjusted by technicians daily. An improved version of the multi-mastergroup "stacker", MMX, was also used, eliminating the use of "submaster groups" in the modulation scheme, which was another maintenance and operational headache for terminal technicians.

      GTE LCXR

      There was yet another coax route out of LSANCA03, to GTE in Santa Monica. This was an L-4 system built around the same time as the CORN-LSAN route, and provided large capacity for toll traffic to GTE's Santa Monica toll office. The terminal on the Santa Monica end was owned and maintained by GTE, a unique situation among all coax cables in the country. All multiplex equipment was made by GTE's Lenkurt as their 46-A type, rather than Western Electric, and it was completely "U-600" compatible with WECO LMX and MMX equipment.

      STEP BY STEP

      As late as 1986, there was still a step-by-step switch operating at the Grande Complex, although only for "High Volume Call-In" service (HVCI) for radio television station contest call loads and the like.


      NOTE: Special thanks to Bob Scarborough for the technical information on this page.
    • Mike Cowen
      Here s a link to the mural. Look above the door - it s clearly 420 S. Grand, not 433. http://www.you-are-here.com/sculpture/bell.html Here s another mural.
      Message 2 of 8 , Mar 26, 2009
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        Here's a link to the mural. Look above the door - it's clearly 420
        S. Grand, not 433.
        http://www.you-are-here.com/sculpture/bell.html

        Here's another mural. Is this 433?
        http://www.you-are-here.com/mural/dusk.html

        This is the tower at 420 S. Grand. (yep, older photo - note the logo)
        http://www.you-are-here.com/los_angeles/microwave.html


        At 04:40 AM 3/26/2009, you wrote:

        >The test from my former LA Grand Web Page:
        >
        >This is LSANCA03, 420 S. Grand Ave., originally built in 1961 and
        >raised to seventeen stories (minus tower height) in 1968. The
        >stylized tower design was required by the City Of Los Angeles as a
        >condition of approval of the building's construction. The building
        >with the famous mural (see below) on it was built in 1948, and is
        >LSANCA02, 433 S. Grand Ave. The original 1925 433 S. Olive St.
        >building is LSANCA01, heavily remodeled in 1971 after heavy damage
        >from the Saugus earthquake, which killed three Western Electric
        >installers that were crushed by a collapsing bridge. Together they
        >are collectively known as the "Grand Complex".
        >
        >LSANCA02 also has a much smaller "rack" type radio tower its roof,
        >containing mostly old 13 foot Andrew parabolics and other
        >miscellaneous, as well as "cornies". The old radio room, along with
        >the Television Operating Center, Radiotelephone equipment
        >(forerunner of cellular) and Program Operating Center, was on the
        >twelfth floor of this building, directly below the old antenna rack.
        >The radio room was a veritable museum of ancient Western Electric
        >and Collins radio types, along with 1950s GE radiotelephone
        >transmitters and receivers. It was completely wrecked out around
        >1984, and replaced by digital multiplex equipment, while AT&T tried
        >to play "catch-up" with Sprint.
        >
        >GEP
        >
        >The twelfth floor also housed the transmitter that linked Mount
        >Wilson with a dedicated N-3 carrier terminal, which was part of the
        >GEP system, called "Echo Fox". The carrier terminal was on the third
        >floor with the rest of the toll N carrier, and was top secret for
        >years. A simple patch cord afforded connectivity to the system, and
        >a technician had to be on duty at that location all the time "Echo
        >Fox" was in service to Air Force 1.
        >
        >LSANCA07
        >
        >The "Airport" (LSANCA07), Manchester Ave. at LAX.
        >
        >LSANCA07, appropriately named "Airport" used to be the Serving Test
        >Center for many of the FAA circuits feeding the Los Angeles
        >International Airport. There was a large scale TN (11 GHz) microwave
        >route linking LA 7 and the "Grand Complex", which provided
        >interconnection with all of the coax cables, as well as the
        >transcontinental microwave routes, out of Grand. An interesting
        >story about this route has to do with the building of the ARCO
        >Towers downtown in the 1970s. On its original location, the south
        >tower would have just blocked the path from Grand to Airport.
        >Negotiations between Pacific Telephone and the developer got the
        >building moved ten feet, so the shot wouldn't be blocked. Many more
        >such negotiations took place as high-rise development continued
        >downtown, until finally, there was no alternatives left. The Crocker
        >Center, now the Well Fargo Center, across the street on Grand Ave.,
        >effectively blocked a heavily trafficked TD/TH route to Oat Mountain
        >in the early '80s. All of this traffic was rerouted via L-5E to Sherman Oaks.
        >
        >All of the shots out of "Grand" are completely blocked now by high
        >rise development; none of the antennas on the unique tower are
        >functional, and the seventieth floor radio room is vacant. There has
        >been talk for a few years now about dismantling the landmark tower,
        >but to date, nothing has been done.
        >
        >LSANCA02 MURAL (Missing photo)
        >
        >Front door of LSANCA02, S. Grande Ave. (missing photo)
        >
        >This work was commissioned by Pacific Telephone and Telegraph to
        >grace the new entrance to the Grand Complex in 1961. Containing
        >brass sculpture, mosaic tile and various telephone parts including a
        >satellite link made of wall phone hookswitches (added to celebrate
        >"Early Bird" and the launch of Telstar I), it has been part of the
        >Los Angeles "public art" scene ever since. The same artist
        >originally placed large scale non serif letter above the door that
        >spelled out "Pacific Telephone" in metal encasements that contained
        >mosaics of polished crushed quartz, and underneath was spelled out
        >"Part of the Nationwide Bell System" in a streamline-moderne font in
        >cast aluminum. This was done away with around 1987, replaced by a
        >bland, cast aluminum "Pacific Bell" logo with the asterisk key
        >trademark. Polished black and red granite and marble grace the
        >entrance doors. Such were the days of the Bell System, when things
        >were done with permanence and built for the ages. Now, a Butler
        >building suffices for most new buildings! Some recent AT&T sites
        >have even been housed in converted 7-11 store buildings.
        >
        >LCXR
        >
        >The bulk of the long lines traffic through this office was
        >commercial switched message and private line, although many
        >important government circuits were also carried. Extensive LMX and
        >MMX multi-mastergroup multiplex). 505D plants powered the section
        >towards Mojave to the 14th repeater hut, which was the end of each
        >station's respective power loop.
        >
        >This route, as well as all the other L-3 routes built in 1964, were
        >of the "improved" variety. Functionally, they were the same as the
        >early L-3, and many parts were interchangeable. More noticeable
        >changes were to a 12 tube coax which utilized wider diameter tubes,
        >allowing a higher AC voltage potential between center conductor and
        >the shield. This overcame a problem on the LA-El Paso "A" conversion
        >from L-1, in that the narrower diameter tubes were apt to arc over
        >at points nearest the power feed station, due to a potential of
        >about 5.5 KV existing at the Terminal Main Station of a 75 mile long
        >power loop. On the El Paso "A", sulfur hexaflouride gas was used in
        >place of dry nitrogen to charge the cables for about 16 miles out
        >from San Bernardino and Blythe, as well as other power feed stations.
        >
        >This dangerous gas had to be used, since it would suppress arcing in
        >the cable, where standard dry nitrogen would not. Another change was
        >from selenium rectifiers in DC power supplies, both at the terminals
        >and in the repeater huts, to silicon. The selenium rectifiers in the
        >"early" L-3s proved to be a real maintenance problem around the
        >close of the '70s, although the older lines were never wholesale
        >converted to the newer types of power supplies. At Los Angeles 2 on
        >the El Paso and Oakland routes, AT&T wholesale changed out every
        >selenium rectifier stack in the terminals, and never had another
        >problem with them until the day the systems were turned down for good.
        >
        >Another feature of the "improved" L-3 was the use of the new,
        >solid-state "LMX-2" multiplex in place of the original tube powered
        >and manually regulated LMX-1. This new multiplex provided pilot tone
        >regulation down to every group of 12 channels, where, with LMX-1,
        >pilots had to be manually checked and adjusted by technicians daily.
        >An improved version of the multi-mastergroup "stacker", MMX, was
        >also used, eliminating the use of "submaster groups" in the
        >modulation scheme, which was another maintenance and operational
        >headache for terminal technicians.
        >
        >GTE LCXR
        >
        >There was yet another coax route out of LSANCA03, to GTE in Santa
        >Monica. This was an L-4 system built around the same time as the
        >CORN-LSAN route, and provided large capacity for toll traffic to
        >GTE's Santa Monica toll office. The terminal on the Santa Monica end
        >was owned and maintained by GTE, a unique situation among all coax
        >cables in the country. All multiplex equipment was made by GTE's
        >Lenkurt as their 46-A type, rather than Western Electric, and it was
        >completely "U-600" compatible with WECO LMX and MMX equipment.
        >
        >STEP BY STEP
        >
        >As late as 1986, there was still a step-by-step switch operating at
        >the Grande Complex, although only for "High Volume Call-In" service
        >(HVCI) for radio television station contest call loads and the like.
        >
        >
        >NOTE: Special thanks to Bob Scarborough for the technical
        >information on this page.
        >
        >

        ---------------------------------------------------------------
        Mike Cowen Practice random acts of kindness
        and selfless acts of beauty.
        mcowen@... -Anonymous



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • ozob99
        ... The Richmond-Washington L1, upgraded to L3, had the smaller .270 coax; when a drifting barge mashed it in the Rappahannoc River in the 1970 s it took two
        Message 3 of 8 , Mar 26, 2009
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          --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "taskforceleader" <mcfoster@...> wrote:
          >
          > This route, as well as all the other L-3 routes built in 1964, were of the "improved" variety. Functionally, they were the same as the early L-3, and many parts were interchangeable. More noticeable changes were to a 12 tube coax which utilized wider diameter tubes, allowing a higher AC voltage potential between center conductor and the shield. This overcame a problem on the LA-El Paso "A" conversion from L-1, in that the narrower diameter tubes were apt to arc over at points nearest the power feed station, due to a potential of about 5.5 KV existing at the Terminal Main Station of a 75 mile long power loop. On the El Paso "A", sulfur hexaflouride gas was used in place of dry nitrogen to charge the cables for about 16 miles out from San Bernardino and Blythe, as well as other power feed stations.
          >


          The Richmond-Washington L1, upgraded to L3, had the smaller .270 coax; when a drifting barge mashed it in the Rappahannoc River in the 1970's it took two days of nationwide calling to locate any spare reels of it,finally found the last cache in the midwest. The newer .375 diameter could have been used but there might have been an impedence mismatch problem and the pressure was on to restore the cable SAP due to the many protection channels tied up for the restoration.
        • Timothy V. Peters
          The Grand Complex occupies most of a city block. The Olive St. side has an odd number because it is on the west side of the street. The Grand Ave. side has
          Message 4 of 8 , Mar 26, 2009
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            The Grand Complex occupies most of a city block. The Olive St. side has
            an odd number because it is on the west side of the street. The Grand
            Ave. side has an even number because it is on the east side of the
            street, and that's how they do things in the City of Los Angeles. There
            are actually two buildings on the Grand Ave. side, 420 and 434, though
            434 does not have its own entrance. The original building, with the
            Olive address, makes up the third building in the complex.

            The first mural -- sculpture, really, is on the Grand side. Depending
            where you're going you can enter from either Grand or Olive, but if
            you're entering on Grand, you're going in there.

            The second mural is on the 433 S. Olive building.

            The private security guys who used to guard the Complex had the tower on
            their shoulder patches. Argus Security, as I recall.

            That cover it?

            Mike Cowen wrote:
            >
            > Here's a link to the mural. Look above the door - it's clearly 420
            > S. Grand, not 433.
            > http://www.you-are-here.com/sculpture/bell.html
            > <http://www.you-are-here.com/sculpture/bell.html>
            >
            > Here's another mural. Is this 433?
            > http://www.you-are-here.com/mural/dusk.html
            > <http://www.you-are-here.com/mural/dusk.html>
            >
            > This is the tower at 420 S. Grand. (yep, older photo - note the logo)
            > http://www.you-are-here.com/los_angeles/microwave.html
            > <http://www.you-are-here.com/los_angeles/microwave.html>
            >
            > At 04:40 AM 3/26/2009, you wrote:
            >
            > >The test from my former LA Grand Web Page:
            > >
            > >This is LSANCA03, 420 S. Grand Ave., originally built in 1961 and
            > >raised to seventeen stories (minus tower height) in 1968. The
            > >stylized tower design was required by the City Of Los Angeles as a
            > >condition of approval of the building's construction. The building
            > >with the famous mural (see below) on it was built in 1948, and is
            > >LSANCA02, 433 S. Grand Ave. The original 1925 433 S. Olive St.
            > >building is LSANCA01, heavily remodeled in 1971 after heavy damage
            > >from the Saugus earthquake, which killed three Western Electric
            > >installers that were crushed by a collapsing bridge. Together they
            > >are collectively known as the "Grand Complex".
            > >
            > >LSANCA02 also has a much smaller "rack" type radio tower its roof,
            > >containing mostly old 13 foot Andrew parabolics and other
            > >miscellaneous, as well as "cornies". The old radio room, along with
            > >the Television Operating Center, Radiotelephone equipment
            > >(forerunner of cellular) and Program Operating Center, was on the
            > >twelfth floor of this building, directly below the old antenna rack.
            > >The radio room was a veritable museum of ancient Western Electric
            > >and Collins radio types, along with 1950s GE radiotelephone
            > >transmitters and receivers. It was completely wrecked out around
            > >1984, and replaced by digital multiplex equipment, while AT&T tried
            > >to play "catch-up" with Sprint.
            > >
            > >GEP
            > >
            > >The twelfth floor also housed the transmitter that linked Mount
            > >Wilson with a dedicated N-3 carrier terminal, which was part of the
            > >GEP system, called "Echo Fox". The carrier terminal was on the third
            > >floor with the rest of the toll N carrier, and was top secret for
            > >years. A simple patch cord afforded connectivity to the system, and
            > >a technician had to be on duty at that location all the time "Echo
            > >Fox" was in service to Air Force 1.
            > >
            > >LSANCA07
            > >
            > >The "Airport" (LSANCA07), Manchester Ave. at LAX.
            > >
            > >LSANCA07, appropriately named "Airport" used to be the Serving Test
            > >Center for many of the FAA circuits feeding the Los Angeles
            > >International Airport. There was a large scale TN (11 GHz) microwave
            > >route linking LA 7 and the "Grand Complex", which provided
            > >interconnection with all of the coax cables, as well as the
            > >transcontinental microwave routes, out of Grand. An interesting
            > >story about this route has to do with the building of the ARCO
            > >Towers downtown in the 1970s. On its original location, the south
            > >tower would have just blocked the path from Grand to Airport.
            > >Negotiations between Pacific Telephone and the developer got the
            > >building moved ten feet, so the shot wouldn't be blocked. Many more
            > >such negotiations took place as high-rise development continued
            > >downtown, until finally, there was no alternatives left. The Crocker
            > >Center, now the Well Fargo Center, across the street on Grand Ave.,
            > >effectively blocked a heavily trafficked TD/TH route to Oat Mountain
            > >in the early '80s. All of this traffic was rerouted via L-5E to
            > Sherman Oaks.
            > >
            > >All of the shots out of "Grand" are completely blocked now by high
            > >rise development; none of the antennas on the unique tower are
            > >functional, and the seventieth floor radio room is vacant. There has
            > >been talk for a few years now about dismantling the landmark tower,
            > >but to date, nothing has been done.
            > >
            > >LSANCA02 MURAL (Missing photo)
            > >
            > >Front door of LSANCA02, S. Grande Ave. (missing photo)
            > >
            > >This work was commissioned by Pacific Telephone and Telegraph to
            > >grace the new entrance to the Grand Complex in 1961. Containing
            > >brass sculpture, mosaic tile and various telephone parts including a
            > >satellite link made of wall phone hookswitches (added to celebrate
            > >"Early Bird" and the launch of Telstar I), it has been part of the
            > >Los Angeles "public art" scene ever since. The same artist
            > >originally placed large scale non serif letter above the door that
            > >spelled out "Pacific Telephone" in metal encasements that contained
            > >mosaics of polished crushed quartz, and underneath was spelled out
            > >"Part of the Nationwide Bell System" in a streamline-moderne font in
            > >cast aluminum. This was done away with around 1987, replaced by a
            > >bland, cast aluminum "Pacific Bell" logo with the asterisk key
            > >trademark. Polished black and red granite and marble grace the
            > >entrance doors. Such were the days of the Bell System, when things
            > >were done with permanence and built for the ages. Now, a Butler
            > >building suffices for most new buildings! Some recent AT&T sites
            > >have even been housed in converted 7-11 store buildings.
            > >
            > >LCXR
            > >
            > >The bulk of the long lines traffic through this office was
            > >commercial switched message and private line, although many
            > >important government circuits were also carried. Extensive LMX and
            > >MMX multi-mastergroup multiplex). 505D plants powered the section
            > >towards Mojave to the 14th repeater hut, which was the end of each
            > >station's respective power loop.
            > >
            > >This route, as well as all the other L-3 routes built in 1964, were
            > >of the "improved" variety. Functionally, they were the same as the
            > >early L-3, and many parts were interchangeable. More noticeable
            > >changes were to a 12 tube coax which utilized wider diameter tubes,
            > >allowing a higher AC voltage potential between center conductor and
            > >the shield. This overcame a problem on the LA-El Paso "A" conversion
            > >from L-1, in that the narrower diameter tubes were apt to arc over
            > >at points nearest the power feed station, due to a potential of
            > >about 5.5 KV existing at the Terminal Main Station of a 75 mile long
            > >power loop. On the El Paso "A", sulfur hexaflouride gas was used in
            > >place of dry nitrogen to charge the cables for about 16 miles out
            > >from San Bernardino and Blythe, as well as other power feed stations.
            > >
            > >
            >
            > __._,_.__
            >
            >
          • Blake Bowers
            Why was this? Echo Fox stations all over the US were unattended at times. Don t take your organs to heaven, heaven knows we need them down here! Be an organ
            Message 5 of 8 , Mar 26, 2009
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              Why was this? Echo Fox stations all over the US were unattended at times.




              Don't take your organs to heaven,
              heaven knows we need them down here!
              Be an organ donor, sign your donor card today.

              >
              > The twelfth floor also housed the transmitter that linked Mount Wilson
              > with a dedicated N-3 carrier terminal, which was part of the GEP system,
              > called "Echo Fox". The carrier terminal was on the third floor with the
              > rest of the toll N carrier, and was top secret for years. A simple patch
              > cord afforded connectivity to the system, and a technician had to be on
              > duty at that location all the time "Echo Fox" was in service to Air Force
              > 1.
              >
            • David I. Emery
              ... Mt Wilson has been a Northstar UHF Mux GEP for many years ... this may be a reference to that system which often did have sites manned when in use by
              Message 6 of 8 , Mar 27, 2009
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                On Thu, Mar 26, 2009 at 02:30:43PM -0500, Blake Bowers wrote:
                > Why was this? Echo Fox stations all over the US were unattended at times.

                Mt Wilson has been a Northstar UHF Mux GEP for many years ...
                this may be a reference to that system which often did have sites manned
                when in use by VIPs...

                The N-3 would presumably have carried more than just 1 circuit
                and E/F was mostly deployed as 1 channel full duplex, whilst the mux
                system was either 5 or 15 channels full duplex depending on the era and
                a dedicated mux would certainly have been in order for that.

                It is a bit unclear to me from these comments whether this
                "transmitter" was a microwave link that linked the UHF mux radio site on
                Mt Wilson to the backhaul circuits (to Waldorf etc) via the
                aforementioned LA facility or was in fact a local E/F (or other WHCA
                support) site linked via microwave to Mt Wilson.

                It is of course possible that the actual radio baseband from the
                UHF radios on Mt Wilson was sent down a microwave link to a mux and
                patching facility at this LA site and from there out over leased lines
                to DC.

                Anyone know ?


                > > The twelfth floor also housed the transmitter that linked Mount Wilson
                > > with a dedicated N-3 carrier terminal, which was part of the GEP system,
                > > called "Echo Fox". The carrier terminal was on the third floor with the
                > > rest of the toll N carrier, and was top secret for years. A simple patch
                > > cord afforded connectivity to the system, and a technician had to be on
                > > duty at that location all the time "Echo Fox" was in service to Air Force
                > > 1.


                --
                Dave Emery N1PRE/AE, die@... DIE Consulting, Weston, Mass 02493
                "An empty zombie mind with a forlorn barely readable weatherbeaten
                'For Rent' sign still vainly flapping outside on the weed encrusted pole - in
                celebration of what could have been, but wasn't and is not to be now either."
              • Blake Bowers
                I could almost understand if it was the Northstar system, but not the E/F system. Even the Nightwatch system runs unmanned at many sites with the MUX. In
                Message 7 of 8 , Mar 28, 2009
                • 0 Attachment
                  I could almost understand if it was the Northstar system,
                  but not the E/F system.

                  Even the Nightwatch system runs unmanned at many sites
                  with the MUX. In fact, up until just recently the Nightwatch
                  system has been sitting out in the open in sites that are no longer
                  owned by AT&T - wide open. In the past year they have put in
                  walls and secured the radios, MUX, small office area (With secret
                  marked file cabinet - often found open) etc.

                  One such site had the copper stolen, the rear doors ripped from
                  the building, etc, and no one knew for weeks. (The long lines
                  copper, not the feedline for the Nightwatch system)


                  Don't take your organs to heaven,
                  heaven knows we need them down here!
                  Be an organ donor, sign your donor card today.



                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: "David I. Emery" <die@...>
                  To: <coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Saturday, March 28, 2009 12:06 AM
                  Subject: Re: [coldwarcomms] LA Grand notes


                  > On Thu, Mar 26, 2009 at 02:30:43PM -0500, Blake Bowers wrote:
                  >> Why was this? Echo Fox stations all over the US were unattended at
                  >> times.
                  >
                  > Mt Wilson has been a Northstar UHF Mux GEP for many years ...
                  > this may be a reference to that system which often did have sites manned
                  > when in use by VIPs...
                  >
                  > The N-3 would presumably have carried more than just 1 circuit
                  > and E/F was mostly deployed as 1 channel full duplex, whilst the mux
                  > system was either 5 or 15 channels full duplex depending on the era and
                  > a dedicated mux would certainly have been in order for that.
                  >
                  > It is a bit unclear to me from these comments whether this
                  > "transmitter" was a microwave link that linked the UHF mux radio site on
                  > Mt Wilson to the backhaul circuits (to Waldorf etc) via the
                  > aforementioned LA facility or was in fact a local E/F (or other WHCA
                  > support) site linked via microwave to Mt Wilson.
                  >
                  > It is of course possible that the actual radio baseband from the
                  > UHF radios on Mt Wilson was sent down a microwave link to a mux and
                  > patching facility at this LA site and from there out over leased lines
                  > to DC.
                  >
                  > Anyone know ?
                  >
                  >
                  >> > The twelfth floor also housed the transmitter that linked Mount Wilson
                  >> > with a dedicated N-3 carrier terminal, which was part of the GEP
                  >> > system,
                  >> > called "Echo Fox". The carrier terminal was on the third floor with
                  >> > the
                  >> > rest of the toll N carrier, and was top secret for years. A simple
                  >> > patch
                  >> > cord afforded connectivity to the system, and a technician had to be on
                  >> > duty at that location all the time "Echo Fox" was in service to Air
                  >> > Force
                  >> > 1.
                  >
                  >
                  > --
                  > Dave Emery N1PRE/AE, die@... DIE Consulting, Weston, Mass
                  > 02493
                  > "An empty zombie mind with a forlorn barely readable weatherbeaten
                  > 'For Rent' sign still vainly flapping outside on the weed encrusted pole -
                  > in
                  > celebration of what could have been, but wasn't and is not to be now
                  > either."
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > ------------------------------------
                  >
                  > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >
                  >
                  >
                • Ken Bowles
                  I noticed that a bit more security has been put back into place at Hillsboro. Cameras had been taken down and one has reappeared. A gate has been secured that
                  Message 8 of 8 , Mar 28, 2009
                  • 0 Attachment
                    I noticed that a bit more security has been put back into place at
                    Hillsboro. Cameras had been taken down and one has reappeared. A gate has
                    been secured that had been open for quite a long time.

                    Ken in Union

                    On Sat, Mar 28, 2009 at 9:36 PM, Blake Bowers <bbowers@...> wrote:

                    > I could almost understand if it was the Northstar system,
                    > but not the E/F system.
                    >
                    > Even the Nightwatch system runs unmanned at many sites
                    > with the MUX. In fact, up until just recently the Nightwatch
                    > system has been sitting out in the open in sites that are no longer
                    > owned by AT&T - wide open. In the past year they have put in
                    > walls and secured the radios, MUX, small office area (With secret
                    > marked file cabinet - often found open) etc.
                    >
                    > One such site had the copper stolen, the rear doors ripped from
                    > the building, etc, and no one knew for weeks. (The long lines
                    > copper, not the feedline for the Nightwatch system)
                    >
                    > Don't take your organs to heaven,
                    > heaven knows we need them down here!
                    > Be an organ donor, sign your donor card today.
                    >
                    > ----- Original Message -----
                    > From: "David I. Emery" <die@... <die%40dieconsulting.com>>
                    > To: <coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com <coldwarcomms%40yahoogroups.com>>
                    > Sent: Saturday, March 28, 2009 12:06 AM
                    > Subject: Re: [coldwarcomms] LA Grand notes
                    >
                    > > On Thu, Mar 26, 2009 at 02:30:43PM -0500, Blake Bowers wrote:
                    > >> Why was this? Echo Fox stations all over the US were unattended at
                    > >> times.
                    > >
                    > > Mt Wilson has been a Northstar UHF Mux GEP for many years ...
                    > > this may be a reference to that system which often did have sites manned
                    > > when in use by VIPs...
                    > >
                    > > The N-3 would presumably have carried more than just 1 circuit
                    > > and E/F was mostly deployed as 1 channel full duplex, whilst the mux
                    > > system was either 5 or 15 channels full duplex depending on the era and
                    > > a dedicated mux would certainly have been in order for that.
                    > >
                    > > It is a bit unclear to me from these comments whether this
                    > > "transmitter" was a microwave link that linked the UHF mux radio site on
                    > > Mt Wilson to the backhaul circuits (to Waldorf etc) via the
                    > > aforementioned LA facility or was in fact a local E/F (or other WHCA
                    > > support) site linked via microwave to Mt Wilson.
                    > >
                    > > It is of course possible that the actual radio baseband from the
                    > > UHF radios on Mt Wilson was sent down a microwave link to a mux and
                    > > patching facility at this LA site and from there out over leased lines
                    > > to DC.
                    > >
                    > > Anyone know ?
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >> > The twelfth floor also housed the transmitter that linked Mount Wilson
                    > >> > with a dedicated N-3 carrier terminal, which was part of the GEP
                    > >> > system,
                    > >> > called "Echo Fox". The carrier terminal was on the third floor with
                    > >> > the
                    > >> > rest of the toll N carrier, and was top secret for years. A simple
                    > >> > patch
                    > >> > cord afforded connectivity to the system, and a technician had to be
                    > on
                    > >> > duty at that location all the time "Echo Fox" was in service to Air
                    > >> > Force
                    > >> > 1.
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > --
                    > > Dave Emery N1PRE/AE, die@... <die%40dieconsulting.com> DIE
                    > Consulting, Weston, Mass
                    > > 02493
                    > > "An empty zombie mind with a forlorn barely readable weatherbeaten
                    > > 'For Rent' sign still vainly flapping outside on the weed encrusted pole
                    > -
                    > > in
                    > > celebration of what could have been, but wasn't and is not to be now
                    > > either."
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > ------------------------------------
                    > >
                    > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    >
                    >
                    >


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