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Former usgov site?

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  • B
    Here is about the spot I saw what looked like a former usgov commo site. What gives it away is the gov issue fencing. The local phone companies do not use
    Message 1 of 7 , Feb 3, 2009
      Here is about the spot I saw what looked like a former usgov commo site. What gives it away is the gov issue fencing. The local phone companies do not use this good quality or style fencing. It reminded me of the type of fences on the bell switching stations.

      On that note who was the main phone company in the Philippines before it became independant?

      Many of the old radio stations there still have the American "W" call sign issued pre ww2. Example. WLS Manila. They even use the same jingle as the one in Chicago. The only duplicate radio call sign I have heard in 20 years of shortwave and radio hobby.

      A clause in the phils law said that if the property was American owned before independance it can remain American owned. This applies to radio and tv stations as well. Maybe former sister station?

      So much American history in Asia and so much in danger of being lost to memory.



      http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&q=14.089295,120.996552


      Sent from my iPhone
    • Mark J. Cuccia
      On Tue, 2/3/09, B wrote: [...] ... Offhand, I don t know who owned telco in the Philippines PRIOR to independence, but from the
      Message 2 of 7 , Feb 3, 2009
        On Tue, 2/3/09, B <butte.metz at yahoo dot com> wrote:

        [...]

        > On that note who was the main phone company in the
        > Philippines before it became independent?

        Offhand, I don't know who owned telco in the Philippines
        PRIOR to independence, but from the mid-1950s until circa 1967,
        the primary/dominant telco in the Philippines, PLDT (Philippines
        Long Distance Telephone Co) which provided local service in most
        cities and towns, and was the primary LD provider throughout the
        islands, was owned by US-based General Telephone, which became
        GT&E (General Telephone & Electronics) in 1959 when General Tel
        and Sylvania merged.

        Many Automatic Electric Step-by-Step switches were in use in the
        Philippines in years past, AE being part of GT&E.

        The Philippines never did become part of the North American
        Numbering Plan (Country Code +1), and has always been its own
        telephone country code +63 ever since the CCITT/ITU began the
        worldwide country code format circa 1963.

        I seem to think that the Marcos family and friends "took over"
        PLDT circa 1967 and kicked out GT&E.

        (PLDT would never be under GTE long enough to ever become part of
        VeriZon, although ever since the formation of VZ by the merger
        of BA/NYNEX and GTE/Contel circa 2000, all one-time GTE holdings
        outside of the continental US have since been sold off, including
        one-time GTE operations in Alaska, Hawaii, Saipan, Canada (BC and
        eastern Quebec), Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, and even
        Venezuela; and even one-time Contel in the US, as well as some
        LONG-time GTE areas in the US, have also been sold off since the
        formation of VZ, as well as during the 90's after GTE tookover
        Contel).

        > Many of the old radio stations there still have the American
        > "W" call sign issued pre ww2. Example. WLS Manila. They even
        > use the same jingle as the one in Chicago. The only duplicate
        > radio call sign I have heard in 20 years of shortwave and radio
        > hobby.
        >
        > A clause in the phils law said that if the property was
        > American owned before independence it can remain American
        > owned. This applies to radio and tv stations as well. Maybe
        > former sister station?

        Are/Were there any 'K' call-sign public broadcast radio stations
        in the Philippines?

        I seem to think that the current call-sign first-letter in the
        Philippines was changed to 'D' with independence, although I
        don't know if they actually announce their call-signs that way,
        in the way that the FCC requires radio/TV stations in the US to
        formally announce their call-letters at least once an hour,
        close to the "top" of the hour.

        > So much American history in Asia and so much in danger of
        > being lost to memory.
        >
        > http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&q=14.089295,120.996552

        I remember that the 1967 Manila telephone directory used to be
        in the out-of-town phone book collection at the main branch of
        the New Orleans Public Library, and it was there for years, never
        having been replaced with a later year's directory.

        I think that GT&E's directory publishing division was still
        printing the Manila directory at that time. Also, the fonts,
        "sketch" images in the front pages and in the ads in the yellow
        pages, etc. were all VERY much "standard" US/Canada styles!

        The Philippines even was once part of the "directory code" format
        of the "Yellow Pages Assocation" -- only the US, Canada, Mexico
        and the Caribbean were part of the YPA's directory code format,
        and for some time the Philippines.... the "directory codes"
        assigned by the YPA are those five or six-digit standardized
        codes printed on the spine (or cover) of telephone directories.
        YPA has been an independent organization since shortly before
        the breakup of Bell in 1984, but the YPA and the assignment of
        directory codes was once part of AT&T back in the 1960s/70s-era.

        mjc
      • Sheldon Daitch
        I don t know about the NTC requirements on station ID timing, but most of the stations I d listen to in Manila and northwards, Baguio City and San Fernanco, La
        Message 3 of 7 , Feb 4, 2009
          I don't know about the NTC requirements on station ID timing, but
          most of the stations I'd listen to in Manila and northwards, Baguio City
          and San Fernanco, La Union, well, if they were English, it was pretty
          evident they were using their full call signs. I haven't been in RP since
          2003 to listen to radio.

          If DWSL was using a WLS Chicago jingle package, I wonder if they really
          paid for it?

          The TV stations don't seem to ID with a call sign, IIRC, but they sure do
          use their corporate logs everywhere, GMA-7 and ABS-CBN, especially, and
          even on their satellite feeds, so there is certainly an identify on
          the TV signals. I have ABS-CBN feed at home and we have a GMA-7 feed at
          work, so I get to watch these every now and then.

          The location for that "USGOV" site is down near the lake at Lake Taal,
          and I can't imagine anything other than a satellite earth station
          would be there, considering the shielding of Taal's crater line. I've
          been near that location, but I don't know if I went that far to the east
          from the town.

          PhilcomSat has or used to have a satellite earth station at Pinugay, but
          I never visited that location.

          I am not saying that location in Taal area wasn't a USG site, as there
          were quite a few comms locations in RP, but I never heard anyone
          ever talking about something next to Lake Taal.

          73
          Sheldon


          --- On Wed, 2/4/09, Mark J. Cuccia <markjcuccia@...> wrote:

          From: Mark J. Cuccia <markjcuccia@...>
          Subject: [coldwarcomms] Re: Former usgov site?
          To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
          Cc: markjcuccia@...
          Date: Wednesday, February 4, 2009, 8:51 AM






          On Tue, 2/3/09, B <butte.metz at yahoo dot com> wrote:

          > Many of the old radio stations there still have the American
          > "W" call sign issued pre ww2. Example. WLS Manila. They even
          > use the same jingle as the one in Chicago. The only duplicate
          > radio call sign I have heard in 20 years of shortwave and radio
          > hobby.
          >
          > A clause in the phils law said that if the property was
          > American owned before independence it can remain American
          > owned. This applies to radio and tv stations as well. Maybe
          > former sister station?

          Are/Were there any 'K' call-sign public broadcast radio stations
          in the Philippines?

          I seem to think that the current call-sign first-letter in the
          Philippines was changed to 'D' with independence, although I
          don't know if they actually announce their call-signs that way,
          in the way that the FCC requires radio/TV stations in the US to
          formally announce their call-letters at least once an hour,
          close to the "top" of the hour.

          >
        • butte.metz
          The station is by the private zoo up there. Maybe something one of our gov contractors built for the phils government with foreign aid? I do know Andrew
          Message 4 of 7 , Feb 4, 2009
            The station is by the private zoo up there. Maybe something one of our gov contractors
            built for the phils government with foreign aid?

            I do know Andrew company is quite active in phils now. They do a lot of microwave and
            satellite service. The head of their Philippines office is my neighbour. He said they provide
            the VOIP and data connections for the outsourcing companies as the local Philippine
            phone companies service is not reliable.

            How come I don't see mention of Andrew company here? Considering that I see their
            logo on so much microwave equipment. Were they known as something else before?

            Found out more about DWLS after I posted here. It is odd that they do not use the D in
            the station ID on air.

            As far as the jingle goes... Well you know the philippines... LOL




            In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, Sheldon Daitch <sheldondaitch@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > I don't know about the NTC requirements on station ID timing, but
            > most of the stations I'd listen to in Manila and northwards, Baguio City
            > and San Fernanco, La Union, well, if they were English, it was pretty
            > evident they were using their full call signs. I haven't been in RP since
            > 2003 to listen to radio.
            >
            > If DWSL was using a WLS Chicago jingle package, I wonder if they really
            > paid for it?
            >
            > The TV stations don't seem to ID with a call sign, IIRC, but they sure do
            > use their corporate logs everywhere, GMA-7 and ABS-CBN, especially, and
            > even on their satellite feeds, so there is certainly an identify on
            > the TV signals. I have ABS-CBN feed at home and we have a GMA-7 feed at
            > work, so I get to watch these every now and then.
            >
            > The location for that "USGOV" site is down near the lake at Lake Taal,
            > and I can't imagine anything other than a satellite earth station
            > would be there, considering the shielding of Taal's crater line. I've
            > been near that location, but I don't know if I went that far to the east
            > from the town.
            >
            > PhilcomSat has or used to have a satellite earth station at Pinugay, but
            > I never visited that location.
            >
            > I am not saying that location in Taal area wasn't a USG site, as there
            > were quite a few comms locations in RP, but I never heard anyone
            > ever talking about something next to Lake Taal.
            >
            > 73
            > Sheldon
            >
            >
            > --- On Wed, 2/4/09, Mark J. Cuccia <markjcuccia@...> wrote:
            >
            > From: Mark J. Cuccia <markjcuccia@...>
            > Subject: [coldwarcomms] Re: Former usgov site?
            > To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
            > Cc: markjcuccia@...
            > Date: Wednesday, February 4, 2009, 8:51 AM
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > On Tue, 2/3/09, B <butte.metz at yahoo dot com> wrote:
            >
            > > Many of the old radio stations there still have the American
            > > "W" call sign issued pre ww2. Example. WLS Manila. They even
            > > use the same jingle as the one in Chicago. The only duplicate
            > > radio call sign I have heard in 20 years of shortwave and radio
            > > hobby.
            > >
            > > A clause in the phils law said that if the property was
            > > American owned before independence it can remain American
            > > owned. This applies to radio and tv stations as well. Maybe
            > > former sister station?
            >
            > Are/Were there any 'K' call-sign public broadcast radio stations
            > in the Philippines?
            >
            > I seem to think that the current call-sign first-letter in the
            > Philippines was changed to 'D' with independence, although I
            > don't know if they actually announce their call-signs that way,
            > in the way that the FCC requires radio/TV stations in the US to
            > formally announce their call-letters at least once an hour,
            > close to the "top" of the hour.
            >
            > >
            >
          • butte.metz
            The yellow pages are still published. Hard to find cause they run out fast. We used PLDT in Quezon City for my call center I ran for about 6 months. Had too
            Message 5 of 7 , Feb 4, 2009
              The yellow pages are still published. Hard to find cause they run out fast.

              We used PLDT in Quezon City for my call center I ran for about 6 months. Had too many
              problems with service interruptions to make the business work.

              PLDT Bayantel, Smart and Sun are the big players now. The "landlines" now issued are
              wireless because of the rampant cable theft. My subdivision had the switching gear and
              cable stolen 3 times. We don't have hard wired service anymore. All wireless LAN
              broadband and wireless cell based landline phone.

              Phone service there is very expensive. It is cheaper to call the States on Vonnage than
              call local for a month.

              There is another former Marcos era phone company there that is out of business now.
              Can't remember the name offhand but the offices are still there. Fenced in with the
              service trucks rotting away in the tropic climate.

              --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "Mark J. Cuccia" <markjcuccia@...> wrote:
              >
              > On Tue, 2/3/09, B <butte.metz at yahoo dot com> wrote:
              >
              > [...]
              >
              > > On that note who was the main phone company in the
              > > Philippines before it became independent?
              >
              > Offhand, I don't know who owned telco in the Philippines
              > PRIOR to independence, but from the mid-1950s until circa 1967,
              > the primary/dominant telco in the Philippines, PLDT (Philippines
              > Long Distance Telephone Co) which provided local service in most
              > cities and towns, and was the primary LD provider throughout the
              > islands, was owned by US-based General Telephone, which became
              > GT&E (General Telephone & Electronics) in 1959 when General Tel
              > and Sylvania merged.
              >
              > Many Automatic Electric Step-by-Step switches were in use in the
              > Philippines in years past, AE being part of GT&E.
              >
              > The Philippines never did become part of the North American
              > Numbering Plan (Country Code +1), and has always been its own
              > telephone country code +63 ever since the CCITT/ITU began the
              > worldwide country code format circa 1963.
              >
              > I seem to think that the Marcos family and friends "took over"
              > PLDT circa 1967 and kicked out GT&E.
              >
              > (PLDT would never be under GTE long enough to ever become part of
              > VeriZon, although ever since the formation of VZ by the merger
              > of BA/NYNEX and GTE/Contel circa 2000, all one-time GTE holdings
              > outside of the continental US have since been sold off, including
              > one-time GTE operations in Alaska, Hawaii, Saipan, Canada (BC and
              > eastern Quebec), Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, and even
              > Venezuela; and even one-time Contel in the US, as well as some
              > LONG-time GTE areas in the US, have also been sold off since the
              > formation of VZ, as well as during the 90's after GTE tookover
              > Contel).
              >
              > > Many of the old radio stations there still have the American
              > > "W" call sign issued pre ww2. Example. WLS Manila. They even
              > > use the same jingle as the one in Chicago. The only duplicate
              > > radio call sign I have heard in 20 years of shortwave and radio
              > > hobby.
              > >
              > > A clause in the phils law said that if the property was
              > > American owned before independence it can remain American
              > > owned. This applies to radio and tv stations as well. Maybe
              > > former sister station?
              >
              > Are/Were there any 'K' call-sign public broadcast radio stations
              > in the Philippines?
              >
              > I seem to think that the current call-sign first-letter in the
              > Philippines was changed to 'D' with independence, although I
              > don't know if they actually announce their call-signs that way,
              > in the way that the FCC requires radio/TV stations in the US to
              > formally announce their call-letters at least once an hour,
              > close to the "top" of the hour.
              >
              > > So much American history in Asia and so much in danger of
              > > being lost to memory.
              > >
              > > http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&q=14.089295,120.996552
              >
              > I remember that the 1967 Manila telephone directory used to be
              > in the out-of-town phone book collection at the main branch of
              > the New Orleans Public Library, and it was there for years, never
              > having been replaced with a later year's directory.
              >
              > I think that GT&E's directory publishing division was still
              > printing the Manila directory at that time. Also, the fonts,
              > "sketch" images in the front pages and in the ads in the yellow
              > pages, etc. were all VERY much "standard" US/Canada styles!
              >
              > The Philippines even was once part of the "directory code" format
              > of the "Yellow Pages Assocation" -- only the US, Canada, Mexico
              > and the Caribbean were part of the YPA's directory code format,
              > and for some time the Philippines.... the "directory codes"
              > assigned by the YPA are those five or six-digit standardized
              > codes printed on the spine (or cover) of telephone directories.
              > YPA has been an independent organization since shortly before
              > the breakup of Bell in 1984, but the YPA and the assignment of
              > directory codes was once part of AT&T back in the 1960s/70s-era.
              >
              > mjc
              >
            • Sheldon Daitch
              Digitel is the dial tone provider in Iba, Zambales.    We are trying to get service set up again at the province house, wife got piqued over harrassing calls
              Message 6 of 7 , Feb 4, 2009
                Digitel is the dial tone provider in Iba, Zambales. 
                 
                We are trying to get service set up again at the province house, wife got piqued over harrassing calls and rather than simply getting the number changed, she opted for a disconnect.  Digitel isn't user friendly when one is a few thousand miles away.
                 


                --- On Wed, 2/4/09, butte.metz <butte.metz@...> wrote:

                From: butte.metz <butte.metz@...>
                Subject: [coldwarcomms] Re: Former usgov site?
                To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Wednesday, February 4, 2009, 2:34 PM






                The yellow pages are still published. Hard to find cause they run out fast.

                We used PLDT in Quezon City for my call center I ran for about 6 months. Had too many
                problems with service interruptions to make the business work.

                PLDT Bayantel, Smart and Sun are the big players now. The "landlines" now issued are
                wireless because of the rampant cable theft. My subdivision had the switching gear and
                cable stolen 3 times. We don't have hard wired service anymore. All wireless LAN
                broadband and wireless cell based landline phone.

                Phone service there is very expensive. It is cheaper to call the States on Vonnage than
                call local for a month.

                There is another former Marcos era phone company there that is out of business now.
                Can't remember the name offhand but the offices are still there. Fenced in with the
                service trucks rotting away in the tropic climate.

                --- In coldwarcomms@ yahoogroups. com, "Mark J. Cuccia" <markjcuccia@ ...> wrote:
                >
                > On Tue, 2/3/09, B <butte.metz at yahoo dot com> wrote:
                >
                > [...]
                >
                > > On that note who was the main phone company in the
                > > Philippines before it became independent?
                >
                > Offhand, I don't know who owned telco in the Philippines
                > PRIOR to independence, but from the mid-1950s until circa 1967,
                > the primary/dominant telco in the Philippines, PLDT (Philippines
                > Long Distance Telephone Co) which provided local service in most
                > cities and towns, and was the primary LD provider throughout the
                > islands, was owned by US-based General Telephone, which became
                > GT&E (General Telephone & Electronics) in 1959 when General Tel
                > and Sylvania merged.
                >
                > Many Automatic Electric Step-by-Step switches were in use in the
                > Philippines in years past, AE being part of GT&E.
                >
                > The Philippines never did become part of the North American
                > Numbering Plan (Country Code +1), and has always been its own
                > telephone country code +63 ever since the CCITT/ITU began the
                > worldwide country code format circa 1963.
                >
                > I seem to think that the Marcos family and friends "took over"
                > PLDT circa 1967 and kicked out GT&E.
                >
                > (PLDT would never be under GTE long enough to ever become part of
                > VeriZon, although ever since the formation of VZ by the merger
                > of BA/NYNEX and GTE/Contel circa 2000, all one-time GTE holdings
                > outside of the continental US have since been sold off, including
                > one-time GTE operations in Alaska, Hawaii, Saipan, Canada (BC and
                > eastern Quebec), Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, and even
                > Venezuela; and even one-time Contel in the US, as well as some
                > LONG-time GTE areas in the US, have also been sold off since the
                > formation of VZ, as well as during the 90's after GTE tookover
                > Contel).
                >
                > > Many of the old radio stations there still have the American
                > > "W" call sign issued pre ww2. Example. WLS Manila. They even
                > > use the same jingle as the one in Chicago. The only duplicate
                > > radio call sign I have heard in 20 years of shortwave and radio
                > > hobby.
                > >
                > > A clause in the phils law said that if the property was
                > > American owned before independence it can remain American
                > > owned. This applies to radio and tv stations as well. Maybe
                > > former sister station?
                >
                > Are/Were there any 'K' call-sign public broadcast radio stations
                > in the Philippines?
                >
                > I seem to think that the current call-sign first-letter in the
                > Philippines was changed to 'D' with independence, although I
                > don't know if they actually announce their call-signs that way,
                > in the way that the FCC requires radio/TV stations in the US to
                > formally announce their call-letters at least once an hour,
                > close to the "top" of the hour.
                >
                > > So much American history in Asia and so much in danger of
                > > being lost to memory.
                > >
                > > http://maps. google.com/ maps?f=q& q=14.089295, 120.996552
                >
                > I remember that the 1967 Manila telephone directory used to be
                > in the out-of-town phone book collection at the main branch of
                > the New Orleans Public Library, and it was there for years, never
                > having been replaced with a later year's directory.
                >
                > I think that GT&E's directory publishing division was still
                > printing the Manila directory at that time. Also, the fonts,
                > "sketch" images in the front pages and in the ads in the yellow
                > pages, etc. were all VERY much "standard" US/Canada styles!
                >
                > The Philippines even was once part of the "directory code" format
                > of the "Yellow Pages Assocation" -- only the US, Canada, Mexico
                > and the Caribbean were part of the YPA's directory code format,
                > and for some time the Philippines. ... the "directory codes"
                > assigned by the YPA are those five or six-digit standardized
                > codes printed on the spine (or cover) of telephone directories.
                > YPA has been an independent organization since shortly before
                > the breakup of Bell in 1984, but the YPA and the assignment of
                > directory codes was once part of AT&T back in the 1960s/70s-era.
                >
                > mjc
                >


















                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Radioman390@cs.com
                The largest phone company there, I believe, just filed for bankruptcy. I saw it somewhere and now can t find it.
                Message 7 of 7 , Feb 4, 2009
                  The largest phone company there, I believe, just filed for bankruptcy.
                  I saw it somewhere and now can't find it.


                  Sheldon Daitch <sheldondaitch@...> wrote:

                  >Digitel is the dial tone provider in Iba, Zambales. 

                  >We are trying to get service set up again at the province house, wife got piqued over harrassing calls and rather than simply getting the number changed, she opted for a disconnect.  Digitel isn't user friendly when one is a few thousand miles away.

                  >
                  >
                  >--- On Wed, 2/4/09, butte.metz <butte.metz@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >From: butte.metz <butte.metz@...>
                  >Subject: [coldwarcomms] Re: Former usgov site?
                  >To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
                  >Date: Wednesday, February 4, 2009, 2:34 PM
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >The yellow pages are still published. Hard to find cause they run out fast.
                  >
                  >We used PLDT in Quezon City for my call center I ran for about 6 months. Had too many
                  >problems with service interruptions to make the business work.
                  >
                  >PLDT Bayantel, Smart and Sun are the big players now. The "landlines" now issued are
                  >wireless because of the rampant cable theft. My subdivision had the switching gear and
                  >cable stolen 3 times. We don't have hard wired service anymore. All wireless LAN
                  >broadband and wireless cell based landline phone.
                  >
                  >Phone service there is very expensive. It is cheaper to call the States on Vonnage than
                  >call local for a month.
                  >
                  >There is another former Marcos era phone company there that is out of business now.
                  >Can't remember the name offhand but the offices are still there. Fenced in with the
                  >service trucks rotting away in the tropic climate.
                  >
                  >--- In coldwarcomms@ yahoogroups. com, "Mark J. Cuccia" <markjcuccia@ ...> wrote:
                  >>
                  >> On Tue, 2/3/09, B <butte.metz at yahoo dot com> wrote:
                  >>
                  >> [...]
                  >>
                  >> > On that note who was the main phone company in the
                  >> > Philippines before it became independent?
                  >>
                  >> Offhand, I don't know who owned telco in the Philippines
                  >> PRIOR to independence, but from the mid-1950s until circa 1967,
                  >> the primary/dominant telco in the Philippines, PLDT (Philippines
                  >> Long Distance Telephone Co) which provided local service in most
                  >> cities and towns, and was the primary LD provider throughout the
                  >> islands, was owned by US-based General Telephone, which became
                  >> GT&E (General Telephone & Electronics) in 1959 when General Tel
                  >> and Sylvania merged.
                  >>
                  >> Many Automatic Electric Step-by-Step switches were in use in the
                  >> Philippines in years past, AE being part of GT&E.
                  >>
                  >> The Philippines never did become part of the North American
                  >> Numbering Plan (Country Code +1), and has always been its own
                  >> telephone country code +63 ever since the CCITT/ITU began the
                  >> worldwide country code format circa 1963.
                  >>
                  >> I seem to think that the Marcos family and friends "took over"
                  >> PLDT circa 1967 and kicked out GT&E.
                  >>
                  >> (PLDT would never be under GTE long enough to ever become part of
                  >> VeriZon, although ever since the formation of VZ by the merger
                  >> of BA/NYNEX and GTE/Contel circa 2000, all one-time GTE holdings
                  >> outside of the continental US have since been sold off, including
                  >> one-time GTE operations in Alaska, Hawaii, Saipan, Canada (BC and
                  >> eastern Quebec), Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, and even
                  >> Venezuela; and even one-time Contel in the US, as well as some
                  >> LONG-time GTE areas in the US, have also been sold off since the
                  >> formation of VZ, as well as during the 90's after GTE tookover
                  >> Contel).
                  >>
                  >> > Many of the old radio stations there still have the American
                  >> > "W" call sign issued pre ww2. Example. WLS Manila. They even
                  >> > use the same jingle as the one in Chicago. The only duplicate
                  >> > radio call sign I have heard in 20 years of shortwave and radio
                  >> > hobby.
                  >> >
                  >> > A clause in the phils law said that if the property was
                  >> > American owned before independence it can remain American
                  >> > owned. This applies to radio and tv stations as well. Maybe
                  >> > former sister station?
                  >>
                  >> Are/Were there any 'K' call-sign public broadcast radio stations
                  >> in the Philippines?
                  >>
                  >> I seem to think that the current call-sign first-letter in the
                  >> Philippines was changed to 'D' with independence, although I
                  >> don't know if they actually announce their call-signs that way,
                  >> in the way that the FCC requires radio/TV stations in the US to
                  >> formally announce their call-letters at least once an hour,
                  >> close to the "top" of the hour.
                  >>
                  >> > So much American history in Asia and so much in danger of
                  >> > being lost to memory.
                  >> >
                  >> > http://maps. google.com/ maps?f=q& q=14.089295, 120.996552
                  >>
                  >> I remember that the 1967 Manila telephone directory used to be
                  >> in the out-of-town phone book collection at the main branch of
                  >> the New Orleans Public Library, and it was there for years, never
                  >> having been replaced with a later year's directory.
                  >>
                  >> I think that GT&E's directory publishing division was still
                  >> printing the Manila directory at that time. Also, the fonts,
                  >> "sketch" images in the front pages and in the ads in the yellow
                  >> pages, etc. were all VERY much "standard" US/Canada styles!
                  >>
                  >> The Philippines even was once part of the "directory code" format
                  >> of the "Yellow Pages Assocation" -- only the US, Canada, Mexico
                  >> and the Caribbean were part of the YPA's directory code format,
                  >> and for some time the Philippines. ... the "directory codes"
                  >> assigned by the YPA are those five or six-digit standardized
                  >> codes printed on the spine (or cover) of telephone directories.
                  >> YPA has been an independent organization since shortly before
                  >> the breakup of Bell in 1984, but the YPA and the assignment of
                  >> directory codes was once part of AT&T back in the 1960s/70s-era.
                  >>
                  >> mjc
                  >>
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