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Morse Telegraphy in the Cold War?

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  • ozob99
    CW communications was used(and intercepted) extensively by us(US:) in the 1st half of the Cold War at least; researching further I found this fascinating
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 4, 2008
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      CW communications was used(and intercepted) extensively by us(US:) in
      the 1st half of the Cold War at least; researching further I found
      this fascinating historical page on telegraph keys,bugs & apparatus;
      and wondered if there was still any use of Morse Telegraphy(sounder)
      by the gov't into the early years of the Cold War? If not
      Conus,perhaps overseas by our military,intel community or diplomatic
      corps?

      I used the key shown as #8280 on ASW patrols in the 1950's(ART-13
      xmtr in a P2V).


      http://chss.montclair.edu/~pererat/iperkco2.htm


      Some related pages:

      http://www.chss.montclair.edu/~pererat/telegraph.htm#other%20museums

      http://www.telegraph-office.com/
    • Albert LaFrance
      Thanks for the links! I ll add them to my site. One place where I think Morse was used during the Cold War was for so-called numbers transmissions on HF
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 4, 2008
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        Thanks for the links! I'll add them to my site.



        One place where I think Morse was used during the Cold War was for so-called
        "numbers" transmissions on HF radio. Although the voice numbers stations
        (such as those originating from the Warrenton Training Center's Remington,
        VA station) got the most publicity, I've heard that Morse was also very
        commonly used.



        The numbers transmissions, generally believed to be encrypted messages to
        clandestine operatives, consisted of long strings of digits. The
        transmissions originated from various countries in the East and West.



        Albert



        _____

        From: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com [mailto:coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com] On
        Behalf Of ozob99
        Sent: Thursday, December 04, 2008 8:21 PM
        To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [coldwarcomms] Morse Telegraphy in the Cold War?



        CW communications was used(and intercepted) extensively by us(US:) in
        the 1st half of the Cold War at least; researching further I found
        this fascinating historical page on telegraph keys,bugs & apparatus;
        and wondered if there was still any use of Morse Telegraphy(sounder)
        by the gov't into the early years of the Cold War? If not
        Conus,perhaps overseas by our military,intel community or diplomatic
        corps?

        I used the key shown as #8280 on ASW patrols in the 1950's(ART-13
        xmtr in a P2V).

        http://chss. <http://chss.montclair.edu/~pererat/iperkco2.htm>
        montclair.edu/~pererat/iperkco2.htm

        Some related pages:

        http://www.chss.
        <http://www.chss.montclair.edu/~pererat/telegraph.htm#other%20museums>
        montclair.edu/~pererat/telegraph.htm#other%20museums

        http://www.telegrap <http://www.telegraph-office.com/> h-office.com/





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • ozob99
        ... so-called ... stations ... Remington, ... very ... messages to ... West. ... The numbers transmissions would be included in the CW category; the Morse
        Message 3 of 7 , Dec 5, 2008
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          >
          > One place where I think Morse was used during the Cold War was for
          so-called
          > "numbers" transmissions on HF radio. Although the voice numbers
          stations
          > (such as those originating from the Warrenton Training Center's
          Remington,
          > VA station) got the most publicity, I've heard that Morse was also
          very
          > commonly used.
          >
          >
          >
          > The numbers transmissions, generally believed to be encrypted
          messages to
          > clandestine operatives, consisted of long strings of digits. The
          > transmissions originated from various countries in the East and
          West.
          >
          >
          >
          > Albert

          The numbers transmissions would be included in the CW category; the
          Morse Telegraphy I'm wondering about is not the International Morse
          Code sent as modulated or unmodulated continuous wave RF ,or audio on
          land lines*, but the DC line type,with a sounder going clickity clack
          as in old western movies. I think there was some of this still used
          during WW2 and perhaps into the early Cold War years but i can find
          no mention of it online in that era.

          I recall hearing morse code transmitted as audio tones on a few
          military voice grade circuits(GP).
        • Albert LaFrance
          OK, yes - that is definitely something different. Interesting question! I m thinking specific industries like the railroads might be possibilities. I believe
          Message 4 of 7 , Dec 5, 2008
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            OK, yes - that is definitely something different. Interesting question!



            I'm thinking specific industries like the railroads might be possibilities.
            I believe the telegraph companies (WU) had actually gone entirely to
            teleprinters even before WW2.



            Albert



            _____

            From: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com [mailto:coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com] On
            Behalf Of ozob99
            Sent: Friday, December 05, 2008 11:46 AM
            To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [coldwarcomms] Re: Morse Telegraphy in the Cold War?


            The numbers transmissions would be included in the CW category; the
            Morse Telegraphy I'm wondering about is not the International Morse
            Code sent as modulated or unmodulated continuous wave RF ,or audio on
            land lines*, but the DC line type,with a sounder going clickity clack
            as in old western movies. I think there was some of this still used
            during WW2 and perhaps into the early Cold War years but i can find
            no mention of it online in that era.

            I recall hearing morse code transmitted as audio tones on a few
            military voice grade circuits(GP).

            __



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • ozob99
            ... question! ... possibilities. ... Yes,I d guess some railroads used morse until the 1950 s and WU was probably 95% teleprinters even in the 1930 s.An
            Message 5 of 7 , Dec 5, 2008
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              --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "Albert LaFrance"
              <albert.lafrance@...> wrote:
              >
              > OK, yes - that is definitely something different. Interesting
              question!
              >
              >
              >
              > I'm thinking specific industries like the railroads might be
              possibilities.
              > I believe the telegraph companies (WU) had actually gone entirely to
              > teleprinters even before WW2.
              >
              >
              >
              > Albert


              Yes,I'd guess some railroads used morse until the 1950's and WU was
              probably 95% teleprinters even in the 1930's.An exception may have been
              press circuits sending breaking news from remote locations without a
              TTY, and a Morse operator was needed.

              A group member reminded me that AT&T used Morse circuits to cordinate
              cutovers and for order wires between testboards into the 1940's.The
              reason was voice channels were in short supply and toll calls were the
              cash cow, and Morse circuits could be simplexed and composited on
              existing voice cable pairs and open wire for a free ride.

              AT&T Morse circuits were used for order wires between some telegraph
              testboards and program/TV operating centers until about 1955
              , so one could say they were Cold War related since they were used in
              part to maintain gov't telegraph circuits.In fact new hires at AT&T
              CO's with telegraph were required to learn Morse(if needed) as a
              condition of employment. A similar requirement for modern technology
              superceded this: in most CO's with microwave in the 1950's and 1960's,
              a condition of employment was being able to obtain a 2nd Class
              Radiotelephone Operators license on request(via a company school).
            • jhaynesatalumni
              There was an article in the Morse Telegraph Club newsletter about the last train order sent by Morse, and IIRC it was in 1968. Jim W6JVE
              Message 6 of 7 , Dec 6, 2008
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                There was an article in the Morse Telegraph Club newsletter about
                the last train order sent by Morse, and IIRC it was in 1968.

                Jim W6JVE
              • D-
                I ve always been fascinated with these numbers stations . I know it has been mentioned on the group before, but for those that never saw the post- the guy
                Message 7 of 7 , Dec 6, 2008
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                  I've always been fascinated with these "numbers stations". I know it
                  has been mentioned on the group before, but for those that never saw the
                  post- the guy who took it to a whole new level:

                  NPR interview:
                  http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4167689

                  Wikipedia:
                  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Conet_Project

                  Downloads:
                  http://irdial.hyperreal.org/www/conet_project_booklet.pdf
                  http://irdial.hyperreal.org/the%20conet%20project/



                  Albert LaFrance wrote:
                  >
                  > Thanks for the links! I'll add them to my site.
                  >
                  > One place where I think Morse was used during the Cold War was for
                  > so-called
                  > "numbers" transmissions on HF radio. Although the voice numbers stations
                  > (such as those originating from the Warrenton Training Center's Remington,
                  > VA station) got the most publicity, I've heard that Morse was also very
                  > commonly used.
                  >
                  > The numbers transmissions, generally believed to be encrypted messages to
                  > clandestine operatives, consisted of long strings of digits. The
                  > transmissions originated from various countries in the East and West.
                  >
                  > Albert
                  >
                  > _____
                  >
                  > From: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
                  > <mailto:coldwarcomms%40yahoogroups.com>
                  > [mailto:coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
                  > <mailto:coldwarcomms%40yahoogroups.com>] On
                  > Behalf Of ozob99
                  > Sent: Thursday, December 04, 2008 8:21 PM
                  > To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com <mailto:coldwarcomms%40yahoogroups.com>
                  > Subject: [coldwarcomms] Morse Telegraphy in the Cold War?
                  >
                  > CW communications was used(and intercepted) extensively by us(US:) in
                  > the 1st half of the Cold War at least; researching further I found
                  > this fascinating historical page on telegraph keys,bugs & apparatus;
                  > and wondered if there was still any use of Morse Telegraphy(sounder)
                  > by the gov't into the early years of the Cold War? If not
                  > Conus,perhaps overseas by our military,intel community or diplomatic
                  > corps?
                  >
                  > I used the key shown as #8280 on ASW patrols in the 1950's(ART-13
                  > xmtr in a P2V).
                  >
                  > http://chss. <http://chss.montclair.edu/~pererat/iperkco2.htm
                  > <http://chss.montclair.edu/%7Epererat/iperkco2.htm>>
                  > montclair.edu/~pererat/iperkco2.htm
                  >
                  > Some related pages:
                  >
                  > http://www.chss.
                  > <http://www.chss.montclair.edu/~pererat/telegraph.htm#other%20museums
                  > <http://www.chss.montclair.edu/%7Epererat/telegraph.htm#other%20museums>>
                  > montclair.edu/~pererat/telegraph.htm#other%20museums
                  >
                  > http://www.telegrap <http://www.telegraph-office.com/
                  > <http://www.telegraph-office.com/>> h-office.com/
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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