Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Broadband and Hi-Speed Switched Data, was 1968 AT&T Print-Ad

Expand Messages
  • Mark J. Cuccia
    ... But in the historical context that the word Broadband was used, a print-ad from almost 40 years ago in late 1968, I don t see anything wrong with such
    Message 1 of 7 , Feb 28, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      Mike Cowen <mcowen at mindspring dot com> wrote:

      > The grossly loose definition of "broadband" gives me a headache.
      > I see it used on anything above POTS. 56K leased line? Broadband.
      > Bull! The world has moved ahead. My 12Mbps connection IS broadband.


      But in the historical context that the word "Broadband" was used,
      a print-ad from almost 40 years ago in late 1968, I don't see anything
      wrong with such use!

      At that time, 56K WAS INDEED considered BROAD-band by those who used
      such capabilities. Back then during the 1960s and even into the 1970s,
      Bell Labs, AT&T Long Lines, and the BOCs were trying to expand on
      a *switched* 56K digital data service, but at the time, the only
      active customer, with the possible exception of some specialized
      government/military departments, was Maw Bell herself, to exchange
      billing data among the various toll offices and RAOs, and AT&T's
      Kansas City MO Traffic Routing Administration HQ, for processing
      long distance charges to appear on customers' bills.

      AT&T actually wanted to be THE provider of switched 56K high-speed
      (at the time) data, with these highly specialized dataphone modems
      and a "Special Area Code" to be assigned, as well as special routing
      and trunking, similar to what was in place for still-at-the-time
      AT&T owned-and-provided TWX, and what AT&T also hoped to provide for
      a switched 2-way Picturephone service.

      There was very little customer interest at that time for such a
      switched high-speed data service, although PRIVATE LEASED use was in
      demand, and also Antitrust got involved to try to prevent AT&T from
      having an almost total monopoly on providing both the SWITCHED aspects
      of a public broadband or high-speed network, as well as the dataphone
      modems for such. With the exception of AT&T's own "in house" use of
      *switched* 56K data service for routing billing messages back and
      forth between AT&T-LL in KC MO, and the BOCs and some of the larger
      independents, such *switched* 56K data really didn't get off the
      ground that much until the mid-1970s.

      And even though today, most of us wouldn't consider 56K to be "broad"
      band, back then in the 1960s, 56K *WAS INDEED* "broadband", and it
      did begin the continued development of higher speeds and larger
      bandwidth over time.

      mjc
    • Charles Fargis
      DUV was a single T1 QPSK filtered in below R carrier s first mastergroup MMX. When they did that they changed the name of the broadband channel from
      Message 2 of 7 , Mar 1, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        DUV was a single T1 QPSK filtered in below R carrier's first mastergroup
        MMX.
        When they did that they changed the name of the broadband channel from
        MUR(Message Unit Radio) to DMUR( DIGITAL).
        That whole T1 could have been one circuit for 1 customer or typically
        subrate multiplexed with an unbelievable amount of combinations
        including administrative stuff like taking one 2.4KBPS circuit and loopin
        the data back remotely for testing.


        -----Original Message-----
        From: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com [mailto:coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com] On
        Behalf Of David Lesher
        Sent: Wednesday, February 28, 2007 12:49 PM
        To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [coldwarcomms] broadband, was tower downed



        Speaking on Deep Background, the Press Secretary whispered:
        >
        > I agree! The grossly loose definition of
        > "broadband" gives me a headache. I see it used
        > on anything above POTS. 56K leased
        > line? Broadband. Bull! The world has moved
        > ahead. My 12Mbps connection IS broadband.
        >
        > Does anyone have a history of the circuits ever
        > housed here, an what the maximum useable bandwidth was for each?

        I recall the entire Data Under Voice project delivered one, that's
        O N E, DS1 circuit.....

        --
        A host is a host from coast to coast.......
        <mailto:coast.................wb8foz%40nrk.com> ..........wb8foz@...
        & no one will talk to a host that's close........[v].(301) 56-LINUX
        Unless the host (that isn't close).........................pob 1433
        is busy, hung or dead....................................20915-1433






        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.