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900Mhz at former DEW Line site

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  • Rob
    I subscribe to a forum that deals with commercial Motorola Radios and I thought the follow might be of interest to the group. There is an amateur radio
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 7, 2006
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      I subscribe to a forum that deals with commercial Motorola Radios and
      I thought the follow might be of interest to the group.

      There is an amateur radio operator that is working on connecting two
      former DEW training sites via 900Mhz radio.

      The full thread can be read at:
      http://batboard.batlabs.com/viewtopic.php?t=63286

      Here's a post explaining the project.

      Keep in mind this an experiment for amateur radio. It's not intended
      to be a commercial communications link. A telephony based 56k or T1
      circuit could be ordered, if that was the intention of the project.

      Here's the 'low-down' on the sites:

      Location A: The former DEW (Distant Early Warning) Line Training
      Facility, which is located southwest of Streater, Illinois.
      (http://www.lswilson.ca/streator.htm).

      Location B: The relay station for the former DEW Line Training
      Facility, which is located just south of U.S. Route 20, west of
      Rockford, Illinois.
      Both properties have since been sold by the government, and are
      privately owned. The dishes are intact, but the condition of the
      existing waveguide is unknown at this point.

      Both dishes were previously used on 900 MHz, so resonance shouldn't
      be an issue. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Dual_Freq/WACS - See
      Operation section).

      Both sites already have commercial power & are fenced-in by a
      security fence.

      The waveguide to coax transition is still of some concern to me, but
      I've got a few friends in the commercial microwave business, so they
      may have a realistic solution.

      As far as amplifiers go, if the paging amps don't work out, I'm
      looking at the TPL HMS series of amplifiers. Their power output is
      rather low in comparison, but they make a reliable product, and stand
      behind it as well.

      I'm also still concerned about the mode of transmission. Narrow FM
      may not be the best method. Some hams in the Chicago suburbs
      regularly experiment with SSB microwave (10 GHz), and have had good
      results, although these are strictly LOS comms. I don't know enough
      about tropo ducting / scatter, to competently say which mode works
      best.

      Obviously more research is required, and yes this project could be
      potentially costly.
    • s92187
      I am familiar with the Pecatonica end of that tropo link, it would be interesting to see if you can make the Pecatonica to Streator tropo link work again.
      Message 2 of 3 , Dec 21, 2006
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        I am familiar with the Pecatonica end of that tropo link, it would be
        interesting to see if you can make the Pecatonica to Streator tropo
        link work again. BTW, there was a letter posted in Popular
        Communications around 10 years ago from someone who worked at those
        facilities explaining what their original purpose was.

        If need be, you could probably fabricate a type N to waveguide
        transition. I work with commercial microwave links, if you need help
        on this, let me know.

        Please update this list, or me directly, on your progress.

        Terry

        --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "Rob" <rwalker653@...> wrote:
        >
        > I subscribe to a forum that deals with commercial Motorola Radios
        and
        > I thought the follow might be of interest to the group.
        >
        > There is an amateur radio operator that is working on connecting
        two
        > former DEW training sites via 900Mhz radio.
        >
        > The full thread can be read at:
        > http://batboard.batlabs.com/viewtopic.php?t=63286
        >
        > Here's a post explaining the project.
        >
        > Keep in mind this an experiment for amateur radio. It's not
        intended
        > to be a commercial communications link. A telephony based 56k or T1
        > circuit could be ordered, if that was the intention of the project.
        >
        > Here's the 'low-down' on the sites:
        >
        > Location A: The former DEW (Distant Early Warning) Line Training
        > Facility, which is located southwest of Streater, Illinois.
        > (http://www.lswilson.ca/streator.htm).
        >
        > Location B: The relay station for the former DEW Line Training
        > Facility, which is located just south of U.S. Route 20, west of
        > Rockford, Illinois.
        > Both properties have since been sold by the government, and are
        > privately owned. The dishes are intact, but the condition of the
        > existing waveguide is unknown at this point.
        >
        > Both dishes were previously used on 900 MHz, so resonance shouldn't
        > be an issue. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Dual_Freq/WACS -
        See
        > Operation section).
        >
        > Both sites already have commercial power & are fenced-in by a
        > security fence.
        >
        > The waveguide to coax transition is still of some concern to me,
        but
        > I've got a few friends in the commercial microwave business, so
        they
        > may have a realistic solution.
        >
        > As far as amplifiers go, if the paging amps don't work out, I'm
        > looking at the TPL HMS series of amplifiers. Their power output is
        > rather low in comparison, but they make a reliable product, and
        stand
        > behind it as well.
        >
        > I'm also still concerned about the mode of transmission. Narrow FM
        > may not be the best method. Some hams in the Chicago suburbs
        > regularly experiment with SSB microwave (10 GHz), and have had good
        > results, although these are strictly LOS comms. I don't know enough
        > about tropo ducting / scatter, to competently say which mode works
        > best.
        >
        > Obviously more research is required, and yes this project could be
        > potentially costly.
        >
      • Robin K Fry
        I went through Streator back in 1975 and did my basic training there. Not only did they have a tropo system they had a complete FPS-19 radar along with Ground
        Message 3 of 3 , Dec 23, 2006
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          I went through Streator back in 1975 and did my basic training there.
          Not only did they have a tropo system they had a complete FPS-19 radar along
          with Ground radar and a weather station to teach us to be Weather Observers.
          I can not remember the exact set up of the comms but on the Dewline the
          system was a quad diversity system. There were 2 Antennas set at, I
          believe, a wavelength apart. The signal was transmitted an both horizontal
          and vertical planes at 2Kw. I remember having a transmitter down and just
          using just the 20Watt exciter and having full quieting on the other site..
          On The receive side there were 4 receivers with a combiners so that the
          strongest signal was the one used. The sites were approximately 80 miles
          apart. I know that North Wet Tel ran a torpo line South from Lady Franklin
          point which was about a 160 mile shot on half the power we used. At the same
          site some of the Sites some of the Comms techs built the first TVRO system
          with acquired tropo parts. The big problem was the Tropo bandwidth was 4Mhz
          but you need 6 for TV so you could have a good picture without sound of a
          really fuzzy picture with sound.
          I am currently on the Dewline/North Warning site Hall Beach but have at
          home have some of the original manuals for the Tropo, radar and intro to the
          Dewline which I grab out of the Garbage can way back when. I keep meaning to
          Scan them so they could be available as PDF files but have not yet got
          around to it.

          Robin
          VE7FFP/VY0

          _____

          From: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com [mailto:coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com] On
          Behalf Of Rob
          Sent: December 7, 2006 7:10 PM
          To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [coldwarcomms] 900Mhz at former DEW Line site



          I subscribe to a forum that deals with commercial Motorola Radios and
          I thought the follow might be of interest to the group.

          There is an amateur radio operator that is working on connecting two
          former DEW training sites via 900Mhz radio.

          The full thread can be read at:
          http://batboard. <http://batboard.batlabs.com/viewtopic.php?t=63286>
          batlabs.com/viewtopic.php?t=63286

          Here's a post explaining the project.

          Keep in mind this an experiment for amateur radio. It's not intended
          to be a commercial communications link. A telephony based 56k or T1
          circuit could be ordered, if that was the intention of the project.

          Here's the 'low-down' on the sites:

          Location A: The former DEW (Distant Early Warning) Line Training
          Facility, which is located southwest of Streater, Illinois.
          (http://www.lswilson <http://www.lswilson.ca/streator.htm>
          .ca/streator.htm).

          Location B: The relay station for the former DEW Line Training
          Facility, which is located just south of U.S. Route 20, west of
          Rockford, Illinois.
          Both properties have since been sold by the government, and are
          privately owned. The dishes are intact, but the condition of the
          existing waveguide is unknown at this point.

          Both dishes were previously used on 900 MHz, so resonance shouldn't
          be an issue. (http://en.wikipedia
          <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Dual_Freq/WACS>
          .org/wiki/User:Dual_Freq/WACS - See
          Operation section).

          Both sites already have commercial power & are fenced-in by a
          security fence.

          The waveguide to coax transition is still of some concern to me, but
          I've got a few friends in the commercial microwave business, so they
          may have a realistic solution.

          As far as amplifiers go, if the paging amps don't work out, I'm
          looking at the TPL HMS series of amplifiers. Their power output is
          rather low in comparison, but they make a reliable product, and stand
          behind it as well.

          I'm also still concerned about the mode of transmission. Narrow FM
          may not be the best method. Some hams in the Chicago suburbs
          regularly experiment with SSB microwave (10 GHz), and have had good
          results, although these are strictly LOS comms. I don't know enough
          about tropo ducting / scatter, to competently say which mode works
          best.

          Obviously more research is required, and yes this project could be
          potentially costly.






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