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Re: RIP, our logo

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  • Spencer
    ... ref=us&pagewanted=print ... I ll miss it, but even more I miss the black and yellow ones that used to be on signs, letters, and the sirens (at lesst here
    Message 1 of 6 , Dec 1, 2006
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      --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, David Lesher <wb8foz@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > http://www.nytimes.com/2006/12/01/washington/01civil.html?
      ref=us&pagewanted=print
      >
      >
      >
      > December 1, 2006
      >
      > Civil Defense Logo Dies at 67, and Some Mourn Its Passing
      >
      > By DAVID W. DUNLAP
      >
      > The stark insignia of civil defense a C and D forming a red circle
      > in a white triangle on a blue disk died yesterday after a long
      > eclipse. It was 67 years old and lived in the minds eye of anyone
      > who remembers air-raid drills, fallout shelters and metal drums
      > filled with what had to be the stalest biscuits in the world.
      >
      > Its demise was announced by the National Emergency Management
      > Association, the group that represents state emergency managers.
      >
      > The CD insignia, which the association called a relic from the
      > cold war, was eulogized by Richard Grefé, the executive director
      > of the American Institute of Graphic Arts.
      >
      > The old mark fits in the same category of simplicity and impact
      > occupied by the London Underground map, Mr. Grefé said.
      >
      > Tom Geismar, a principal in Chermayeff & Geismar Studio, a design
      > firm, said the insignia was authoritative and appropriate for
      > the serious work of civil defense.
      >
      > The insignia was born in 1939, said Michael Bierut, a partner
      > in the Pentagram design firm. Its father was Charles T. Coiner,
      > the art director of the N. W. Ayer advertising agency, who also
      > designed the National Recovery Administrations blue eagle.
      >
      > The CD insignia was called anachronistic in 1972 by the Defense
      > Civil Preparedness Agency, successor to the Office of Civil
      > Defense. The image was World War II vintage, the agency said.
      >
      > The EM symbol was endorsed by R. David Paulison, director of
      > the Federal Emergency Management Agency, successor to the civil
      > preparedness agency. He attended the announcement in Washington.
      >
      > The new image was developed by Morrie Goodman, an emergency
      > communications specialist and the managing director of AGG
      > International, a marketing firm.
      >
      > Mr. Goodman said he first tried to update the classic triangle,
      > using EM initials, but wound up with something that looked like
      > the America Online logo. He was then directed by the association
      > to take a fresh approach. In it, the letters EM and the words
      > Public Safety and Public Trust are wreathed in blue and gold arcs,
      > symbolizing movement, and three gold stars, standing for the local,
      > state and federal levels of disaster preparedness and response.
      >
      > We now have a new symbol of what our profession is all about,
      > Mr. Goodman said.
      >
      > Mr. Geismar sounded less sure. He said the stars and swooshes
      > seemed more appropriate to an upstart airline.
      >
      > The CD insignia is survived by countless metal drums, still
      > languishing in school basements, with biscuits that have grown
      > even staler.
      >
      > I will now go cry for Charles Coiner, Mr. Bierut said.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > --
      > A host is a host from coast to coast.................wb8foz@...
      > & no one will talk to a host that's close........[v].(301) 56-LINUX
      > Unless the host (that isn't close).........................pob 1433
      > is busy, hung or dead....................................20915-1433
      >
      I'll miss it, but even more I miss the black and yellow ones that
      used to be on signs, letters, and the sirens (at lesst here in
      california) Remember the 3 triangles, 2 above 1, black on a yellow
      background circle?
    • blitz
      We tested some biscuits a few years back, and found they were still able to be lit to provide heat. They of course were un-edible (or is that in-edible?) They
      Message 2 of 6 , Dec 1, 2006
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        We tested some biscuits a few years back, and
        found they were still able to be lit to provide
        heat. They of course were un-edible (or is that in-edible?)
        They contain a high amount of paraffin, and are
        quite flammable...oh, they were still as stale as
        the day they were packed..glad we never had to eat them.
        The standing joke was, on the side of the green
        drums were instructions to convert them to human waste containers.
        "How would one know the difference?" :-D



        At 01:27 12/1/2006, you wrote:


        ><http://www.nytimes.com/2006/12/01/washington/01civil.html?ref=us&pagewanted=print>http://www.nytimes.com/2006/12/01/washington/01civil.html?ref=us&pagewanted=print
        >
        >December 1, 2006
        >
        >Civil Defense Logo Dies at 67, and Some Mourn Its Passing
        >
        >By DAVID W. DUNLAP
        >
        >The stark insignia of civil defense a C and D forming a red circle
        >in a white triangle on a blue disk died yesterday after a long
        >eclipse. It was 67 years old and lived in the minds eye of anyone
        >who remembers air-raid drills, fallout shelters and metal drums
        >filled with what had to be the stalest biscuits in the world.
        >
        >Its demise was announced by the National Emergency Management
        >Association, the group that represents state emergency managers.
        >
        >The CD insignia, which the association called a relic from the
        >cold war, was eulogized by Richard Grefé, the executive director
        >of the American Institute of Graphic Arts.
        >
        >The old mark fits in the same category of simplicity and impact
        >occupied by the London Underground map, Mr. Grefé said.
        >
        >Tom Geismar, a principal in Chermayeff & Geismar Studio, a design
        >firm, said the insignia was authoritative and appropriate for
        >the serious work of civil defense.
        >
        >The insignia was born in 1939, said Michael Bierut, a partner
        >in the Pentagram design firm. Its father was Charles T. Coiner,
        >the art director of the N. W. Ayer advertising agency, who also
        >designed the National Recovery Administrations blue eagle.
        >
        >The CD insignia was called anachronistic in 1972 by the Defense
        >Civil Preparedness Agency, successor to the Office of Civil
        >Defense. The image was World War II vintage, the agency said.
        >
        >The EM symbol was endorsed by R. David Paulison, director of
        >the Federal Emergency Management Agency, successor to the civil
        >preparedness agency. He attended the announcement in Washington.
        >
        >The new image was developed by Morrie Goodman, an emergency
        >communications specialist and the managing director of AGG
        >International, a marketing firm.
        >
        >Mr. Goodman said he first tried to update the classic triangle,
        >using EM initials, but wound up with something that looked like
        >the America Online logo. He was then directed by the association
        >to take a fresh approach. In it, the letters EM and the words
        >Public Safety and Public Trust are wreathed in blue and gold arcs,
        >symbolizing movement, and three gold stars, standing for the local,
        >state and federal levels of disaster preparedness and response.
        >
        >We now have a new symbol of what our profession is all about,
        >Mr. Goodman said.
        >
        >Mr. Geismar sounded less sure. He said the stars and swooshes
        >seemed more appropriate to an upstart airline.
        >
        >The CD insignia is survived by countless metal drums, still
        >languishing in school basements, with biscuits that have grown
        >even staler.
        >
        >I will now go cry for Charles Coiner, Mr. Bierut said.
        >
        >--
        >A host is a host from coast to
        ><mailto:coast.................wb8foz%40nrk.com>coast.................wb8foz@...
        >& no one will talk to a host that's close........[v].(301) 56-LINUX
        >Unless the host (that isn't close).........................pob 1433
        >is busy, hung or dead....................................20915-1433
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Chris Ness
        ... And twice on every radio dial.
        Message 3 of 6 , Dec 1, 2006
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          On Friday 01 December 2006 01:27 am, David Lesher wrote:
          > http://www.nytimes.com/2006/12/01/washington/01civil.html?ref=us&pagewanted
          >=print
          >
          >
          >
          > December 1, 2006
          >
          > Civil Defense Logo Dies at 67, and Some Mourn Its Passing
          >
          > By DAVID W. DUNLAP
          >
          > The stark insignia of civil defense a C and D forming a red circle
          > in a white triangle on a blue disk died yesterday after a long
          > eclipse. It was 67 years old and lived in the minds eye of anyone
          > who remembers air-raid drills, fallout shelters and metal drums
          > filled with what had to be the stalest biscuits in the world.
          >

          And twice on every radio dial.
        • Mark J. Cuccia
          ... http://www.nytimes.com/2006/12/01/washington/01civil.html?ref=us&pagewanted=print ... The old Conelrad system, before EBS (Emergency Broadcast System) and
          Message 4 of 6 , Dec 1, 2006
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            Chris Ness <mness215 at comcast dot net> wrote:

            > David Lesher posted from the NY Times:

            >>
            http://www.nytimes.com/2006/12/01/washington/01civil.html?ref=us&pagewanted=print

            >> December 1, 2006
            >> Civil Defense Logo Dies at 67, and Some Mourn Its Passing
            >> By DAVID W. DUNLAP
            >>
            >> The stark insignia of civil defense a C and D forming a red circle
            >> in a white triangle on a blue disk died yesterday after a long
            >> eclipse. It was 67 years old and lived in the minds eye of anyone
            >> who remembers air-raid drills, fallout shelters and metal drums
            >> filled with what had to be the stalest biscuits in the world.


            > And twice on every radio dial.


            The old Conelrad system, before EBS (Emergency Broadcast System) and
            the more recent EAS (Emergency Alert System).

            Conelrad's CD logos on the AM Radio Dial, at 640 Kc and 1240 Kc ...

            The early 1960s episode of the Twilight Zone, "The Shelter", about
            the neighberhood gathering where they start hearing news bulletins
            about invasions, which later turns out to be a false alarm, but not
            after all of the neighbers turn against each other, especially against
            the one who had built his OWN family underground shelter... you hear
            mention in the radio and TV news bulletins about tuning to the
            "Conelrad" radio stations.

            Some links to Conelrad-related webpages:

            http://www.conelrad.com/index.php
            http://www.westgeorgia.org/conelrad/
            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CONELRAD
            and others which can be found from a google-search on "Conelrad"

            I can remember my parents' late 1950s Magnavox AM/FM plastic-box
            TUBE radio, in the kitchen, with the chrome details... had the
            little CD logos (without the letters 'CD' inside the triangles)
            at the 640 Kc and 1240 Kc dial-spots on the AM side

            Mark J. Cuccia
            markjcuccia at yahoo dot com
            Lafayette LA, formerly of New Orleans LA pre-Katrina
          • John
            You would think that all of these EMA Directors would have something better to do than worrying about rebranding madness , like preparing for the next big
            Message 5 of 6 , Dec 2, 2006
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              You would think that all of these EMA Directors would have something
              better to do than worrying about "rebranding madness", like preparing
              for the next big storm, etc.

              --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, Chris Ness <mness215@...> wrote:
              >
              > On Friday 01 December 2006 01:27 am, David Lesher wrote:
              > > http://www.nytimes.com/2006/12/01/washington/01civil.html?
              ref=us&pagewanted
              > >=print
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > December 1, 2006
              > >
              > > Civil Defense Logo Dies at 67, and Some Mourn Its Passing
              > >
              > > By DAVID W. DUNLAP
              > >
              > > The stark insignia of civil defense a C and D forming a red circle
              > > in a white triangle on a blue disk died yesterday after a long
              > > eclipse. It was 67 years old and lived in the minds eye of anyone
              > > who remembers air-raid drills, fallout shelters and metal drums
              > > filled with what had to be the stalest biscuits in the world.
              > >
              >
              > And twice on every radio dial.
              >
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