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  • Adam Stabler
    Hello I have just joined the group and I thought that I would introduce myself. My name is Adam I am 26 and live in England. I am off to visit a nuclear bunker
    Message 1 of 11 , Nov 8, 2006
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      Hello I have just joined the group and I thought that I would introduce
      myself.
      My name is Adam I am 26 and live in England.
      I am off to visit a nuclear bunker this Thursday, if any one is
      interested I will report back, http://www.japar.demon.co.uk/
    • mengell gregory
      Message 2 of 11 , Aug 15, 2011
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      • Steve
        Tom...   How did the network video get to your TV station in Hancock/Houghton?  Was yours the one north of the valley on the way up the Keweenaw in the old
        Message 3 of 11 , Aug 15, 2011
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          Tom...
           
          How did the network video get to your TV station in Hancock/Houghton?  Was yours the one north of the valley on the way up the Keweenaw in the old school?  Microwave directly from AT&T?  Video from AT&T into the CO and a local loop?  Or?
           
          CE Stu from Illinois


          --- On Mon, 8/15/11, mengell gregory <gregorymengell@...> wrote:


          From: mengell gregory <gregorymengell@...>
          Subject: [coldwarcomms] Hello
          To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Monday, August 15, 2011, 7:47 PM


           












          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Tom Scanlan
          Steve- Since circa 1982 all network affiliated TV stations in the US, with few exceptions, received their network feeds via satellite. First C-band, then NBC
          Message 4 of 11 , Aug 16, 2011
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            Steve-


            Since circa 1982 all network affiliated TV stations in the US, with few exceptions, received their network feeds via satellite. First C-band, then NBC went Ku Band. Eventually all were encripted, as they are now, and now its all digital, whereas until approx 2002 the feeds were both analog and digital. Now 100% digital. So, no AT&T involvement at all, since WBKP (Ch. 5) in Calumet?Houghton went on the air in 1996, W28BX (26Kw UHF STA, Ch. 28) in Marquette went on air in 1997, and WBUP (Ch. 10) started operations in 2002. W28BX and WBUP were fed via fiber by Charter Cable TV. In September, 2001 W28BX and then WBUP became the 'parent' and WBKP became the satellite, with a local studio in Calumet, and the feed was reversed, Marquette to Calumet. We had a private microwave also from Marquette to the Calumet transmitter, which is in Painesdale, atop Tolonen Hill, Elev. 1,509 AMSL. Our HAAT at Calumet was 968' AAT.



            Our Station in Traverse City, WGTU, Channel 29, on the air in 1971, before satellite delivery, at first used intercity relay to tower in Bear Lake to do an off-air feed from WZZM in Grand Rapids, and that tower was switchable to another off-air receiver from WLUK, in Green Bay. Both these were ABC affiliates. Before our ownership - the feeds looked like crap, and hence the station suffered terrible ratings and a lot of rejection from local advertisers. ....duh.




            Eventually WGTU rented microwave from American Microwave for an off-air pickup from WJRT in Flint, and that feed was much more reliable. Satellite receiving equipment was installed in 1984, as I recall. We bought station in 1988, cleaned up the technical plant....new transmitter, new transmitting antenna, and it became profitable.



            Tom Scanlan

            -----Original Message-----
            From: Steve <steve_61826@...>
            To: coldwarcomms <coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Mon, Aug 15, 2011 5:11 pm
            Subject: Re: [coldwarcomms] Northern Michigan





            Tom...

            How did the network video get to your TV station in Hancock/Houghton? Was yours the one north of the valley on the way up the Keweenaw in the old school? Microwave directly from AT&T? Video from AT&T into the CO and a local loop? Or?

            CE Stu from Illinois

            --- On Mon, 8/15/11, mengell gregory <gregorymengell@...> wrote:

            From: mengell gregory <gregorymengell@...>
            Subject: [coldwarcomms] Hello
            To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Monday, August 15, 2011, 7:47 PM



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]









            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • David I. Emery
            ... FWIW, while the satellite distro feeds for all the US networks are indeed digital and these days in HD and combinations of DVB-S QPSK or DVB-S2 8PSK in
            Message 5 of 11 , Aug 17, 2011
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              On Tue, Aug 16, 2011 at 09:24:05AM -0400, Tom Scanlan wrote:
              > Steve-
              >
              >

              > Since circa 1982 all network affiliated TV stations in the US, with
              > few exceptions, received their network feeds via satellite. First
              > C-band, then NBC went Ku Band. Eventually all were encripted, as they
              > are now, and now its all digital, whereas until approx 2002 the feeds
              > were both analog and digital. Now 100% digital.

              FWIW, while the satellite distro feeds for all the US networks
              are indeed digital and these days in HD and combinations of DVB-S QPSK
              or DVB-S2 8PSK in either 4:2:2 or H264 video (though PBS is still
              4:2:0) they are not currently usually encrypted. Even Fox, which uses
              DVB-S2 and digicipher II is mostly in fixed key mode DCII ... full
              surround audio on these feeds is mostly in either discrete 6 channel or
              Dolby E format except for PBS which still does AC3.

              With the right gear (and a suitably large C band dish) all the
              networks can be watched from their distribution feeds - though not
              with ordinary consumer oriented receiver/decoders in some cases.

              Encryption capability exists in some of the receivers used,
              but it is rarely turned on at the present time.


              --
              Dave Emery N1PRE/AE, die@... DIE Consulting, Weston, Mass 02493
              "An empty zombie mind with a forlorn barely readable weatherbeaten
              'For Rent' sign still vainly flapping outside on the weed encrusted pole - in
              celebration of what could have been, but wasn't and is not to be now either."
            • Tom Scanlan
              Hey Dave- Great info - thanks! Last experience I had with this was 2004, when we sold our stations. Newer house (1998) not equipped with C-band dishes, as
              Message 6 of 11 , Aug 19, 2011
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                Hey Dave-
                Great info - thanks! Last experience I had with this was 2004, when we sold our stations. Newer house (1998) not equipped with C-band dishes, as was our place in lower Michigan. But that's my problem as they say - wife had a LOT to say about landscaping, etc. I was lucky enuf to get away with new 60' tower, still standing, still doing great duty as rotatable TV/FM reception dxing.



                Before ABC went digital, we were encripted perhaps 90% of the time. The rule was, and probably still is, that if you (as a station) had a problem with your decription gear, you'd call ABC MC's hotline and they'd switch off the encription and not turn it on until they called you or you called them to test your receiver.




                If that's the rule today, I'd suspect with 200+ odd affiliates for each network, and all of them having decoders, of which all it takes is one or two small stations with questionable engineers on staff, well, you get the picture!



                I should dig out my old phone list and see if their HL # still works and see what they're doing these days....
                Although as I put 2+2 together, with 91%+ of ALL US Tv households connected to cable and satellite, of those remaining, only a sparse handful probably still have C-Band dishes and receivers, as well as newer digital receivers, does ANYONE really care if a small amount of RF geeks really get to see the network signals free??
                duh...


                Again, thanks for the heads-up!



                Tom Scanlan


                -----Original Message-----
                From: David I. Emery <die@...>
                To: coldwarcomms <coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Wed, Aug 17, 2011 7:06 pm
                Subject: Re: [coldwarcomms] Northern Michigan





                On Tue, Aug 16, 2011 at 09:24:05AM -0400, Tom Scanlan wrote:
                > Steve-
                >
                >

                > Since circa 1982 all network affiliated TV stations in the US, with
                > few exceptions, received their network feeds via satellite. First
                > C-band, then NBC went Ku Band. Eventually all were encripted, as they
                > are now, and now its all digital, whereas until approx 2002 the feeds
                > were both analog and digital. Now 100% digital.

                FWIW, while the satellite distro feeds for all the US networks
                are indeed digital and these days in HD and combinations of DVB-S QPSK
                or DVB-S2 8PSK in either 4:2:2 or H264 video (though PBS is still
                4:2:0) they are not currently usually encrypted. Even Fox, which uses
                DVB-S2 and digicipher II is mostly in fixed key mode DCII ... full
                surround audio on these feeds is mostly in either discrete 6 channel or
                Dolby E format except for PBS which still does AC3.

                With the right gear (and a suitably large C band dish) all the
                networks can be watched from their distribution feeds - though not
                with ordinary consumer oriented receiver/decoders in some cases.

                Encryption capability exists in some of the receivers used,
                but it is rarely turned on at the present time.

                --
                Dave Emery N1PRE/AE, die@... DIE Consulting, Weston, Mass 02493
                "An empty zombie mind with a forlorn barely readable weatherbeaten
                'For Rent' sign still vainly flapping outside on the weed encrusted pole - in
                celebration of what could have been, but wasn't and is not to be now either."









                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Tom Scanlan
                Hey Dave- Great info - thanks! Last experience I had with this was 2004, when we sold our stations. Newer house (1998) not equipped with C-band dishes, as
                Message 7 of 11 , Aug 19, 2011
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                  Hey Dave-
                  Great info - thanks! Last experience I had with this was 2004, when we sold our stations. Newer house (1998) not equipped with C-band dishes, as was our place in lower Michigan. But that's my problem as they say - wife had a LOT to say about landscaping, etc. I was lucky enuf to get away with new 60' tower, still standing, still doing great duty as rotatable TV/FM reception dxing.



                  Before ABC went digital, we were encripted perhaps 90% of the time. The rule was, and probably still is, that if you (as a station) had a problem with your decription gear, you'd call ABC MC's hotline and they'd switch off the encription and not turn it on until they called you or you called them to test your receiver.




                  If that's the rule today, I'd suspect with 200+ odd affiliates for each network, and all of them having decoders, of which all it takes is one or two small stations with questionable engineers on staff, well, you get the picture!



                  I should dig out my old phone list and see if their HL # still works and see what they're doing these days....
                  Although as I put 2+2 together, with 91%+ of ALL US Tv households connected to cable and satellite, of those remaining, only a sparse handful probably still have C-Band dishes and receivers, as well as newer digital receivers, does ANYONE really care if a small amount of RF geeks really get to see the network signals free??
                  duh...


                  Again, thanks for the heads-up!



                  Tom Scanlan


                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: David I. Emery <die@...>
                  To: coldwarcomms <coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Wed, Aug 17, 2011 7:06 pm
                  Subject: Re: [coldwarcomms] Northern Michigan





                  On Tue, Aug 16, 2011 at 09:24:05AM -0400, Tom Scanlan wrote:
                  > Steve-
                  >
                  >

                  > Since circa 1982 all network affiliated TV stations in the US, with
                  > few exceptions, received their network feeds via satellite. First
                  > C-band, then NBC went Ku Band. Eventually all were encripted, as they
                  > are now, and now its all digital, whereas until approx 2002 the feeds
                  > were both analog and digital. Now 100% digital.

                  FWIW, while the satellite distro feeds for all the US networks
                  are indeed digital and these days in HD and combinations of DVB-S QPSK
                  or DVB-S2 8PSK in either 4:2:2 or H264 video (though PBS is still
                  4:2:0) they are not currently usually encrypted. Even Fox, which uses
                  DVB-S2 and digicipher II is mostly in fixed key mode DCII ... full
                  surround audio on these feeds is mostly in either discrete 6 channel or
                  Dolby E format except for PBS which still does AC3.

                  With the right gear (and a suitably large C band dish) all the
                  networks can be watched from their distribution feeds - though not
                  with ordinary consumer oriented receiver/decoders in some cases.

                  Encryption capability exists in some of the receivers used,
                  but it is rarely turned on at the present time.

                  --
                  Dave Emery N1PRE/AE, die@... DIE Consulting, Weston, Mass 02493
                  "An empty zombie mind with a forlorn barely readable weatherbeaten
                  'For Rent' sign still vainly flapping outside on the weed encrusted pole - in
                  celebration of what could have been, but wasn't and is not to be now either."









                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • David I. Emery
                  ... I have battles for C band here with the wife too... she likes Ku dishes a lot better. ... There certainly was an era when everyone ran Leitch encryption
                  Message 8 of 11 , Aug 19, 2011
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                    On Fri, Aug 19, 2011 at 07:38:52AM -0400, Tom Scanlan wrote:
                    > Hey Dave-

                    > Great info - thanks! Last experience I had with this was 2004, when
                    > we sold our stations. Newer house (1998) not equipped with C-band
                    > dishes, as was our place in lower Michigan. But that's my problem as
                    > they say - wife had a LOT to say about landscaping, etc. I was lucky
                    > enuf to get away with new 60' tower, still standing, still doing great
                    > duty as rotatable TV/FM reception dxing.

                    I have battles for C band here with the wife too... she likes Ku
                    dishes a lot better.


                    > Before ABC went digital, we were encripted perhaps 90% of the time.
                    > The rule was, and probably still is, that if you (as a station) had a
                    > problem with your decription gear, you'd call ABC MC's hotline and
                    > they'd switch off the encription and not turn it on until they called
                    > you or you called them to test your receiver.

                    There certainly was an era when everyone ran Leitch encryption
                    most of the time, but after the conversion to DVB digital there really
                    hasn't been much encryption used. For a while CBS and PBS used DCII
                    gear in FK mode, but even that has gone away. However the receivers
                    used do support encryption when someone gets inspired to turn it on. Fox
                    does use BISS encrypted backhauls for a lot of feeds and may well
                    eventually hard encrypt their distribution... depends I guess on how
                    worried the NFL et al gets...

                    > If that's the rule today, I'd suspect with 200+ odd affiliates for
                    > each network, and all of them having decoders, of which all it takes is
                    > one or two small stations with questionable engineers on staff, well,
                    > you get the picture!

                    I think it is currently more a matter of what you say about how
                    many folks have the required dishes and gear - not a big number anymore,
                    just a few geeky hobbyists.


                    > Although as I put 2+2 together, with 91%+ of ALL US Tv households
                    > connected to cable and satellite, of those remaining, only a sparse
                    > handful probably still have C-Band dishes and receivers, as well as
                    > newer digital receivers, does ANYONE really care if a small amount of RF
                    > geeks really get to see the network signals free?? > duh...

                    That seems to have been the bottom line during most of the post
                    2001-2002 era... also standards change, signals go from SD to HD and
                    from QPSK digital to DVB-S2 8PSK and beyond... with various color spaces
                    (4:2:2 becoming more common), codecs (H264 AVC) and audio formats and
                    finding gear to decode it all is more of a hobby/nutcase kind of
                    activity than something large numbers of folks are either interested in
                    doing or able to do.

                    C band cable channel distribution is mostly no longer available
                    to the public (at least on the original feeds to MSOs) as the Digicipher
                    consumer keystream has been shut down and more and more of the cable
                    signals are DVB-S2 and also other encryption formats (powervu), so using
                    a C band dish to watch cable channels is no longer very possible for a
                    consumer. Thus most folks have abandoned their C band dishes so the
                    actual number of people with the gear to watch network distribution is
                    limited - tiny tiny percentage - and with digital signals on the air
                    (and cable and DTH satellite) the quality advantage of watching the
                    direct distribution is much less unless you are VERY fussy and have good
                    eyes and ears and gear.





                    --
                    Dave Emery N1PRE/AE, die@... DIE Consulting, Weston, Mass 02493
                    "An empty zombie mind with a forlorn barely readable weatherbeaten
                    'For Rent' sign still vainly flapping outside on the weed encrusted pole - in
                    celebration of what could have been, but wasn't and is not to be now either."
                  • Tom Scanlan
                    Dave- One of my roles as a retired RF geek is to assist our translator association in Breckenridge, CO make the shift from analog to digital TV. we ve
                    Message 9 of 11 , Aug 20, 2011
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                      Dave-
                      One of my roles as a retired RF geek is to assist our translator association in Breckenridge, CO make the shift from analog to digital TV. we've converted two of our three licensed VHF translators, operating on channels 8, 10 & 12 to HD, and carry multiple services on two that are now HD. NTIA grants of $20K each did the trick to swing the Board (mostly NPR lovers) from wanting to simply abandon TV to doing the job corectly!


                      Part of my 'job' was to work with the local Denver stations when they were approaching their hard turn-off date for their analog operation, as our old analog system easily received excellent audio & video atop Mount Baldy, at our site, some 12,600 feet AMSL, from the transmitters atop Lookout Mountain.


                      We knew KCNC (Analog 4) and KDVR (Analog 31) were already operating companion DTV operations of Channels 35 and 32, but that KUSA and KMGH were going to revert to their VHF channels, 9 & 7, when they went permanent DTV. Engineering files and visits with the stations revealed they were planning new TX facilities on Lookout, using directional antennae with the major lobe AWAY from the mountains.


                      Went to Comcast to learn more about their HITS (Headend In The Sky) service they sell to smaller Mom 'n Pop CATV's across America...sure enough, ABC, NBC, CBS, Fox and PBS from Denver were offered, on C-Band, encripted, digitized, and as I say, 'smashed, pressed and compressed'! Frankly, the end resolution was pretty poor, but if you're stuck up halfway between Steamboat and Craig in a little town of 500 with an old CATV system, you do what you can to scrape by! Pretty inexpensive, as well, especially when you thin that Comcast has the CATV system in Summit County, CO, where we are located!


                      Found out Comcast is VERY cooperative with little non-profit translator stations, even if they do 'compete' for viewers, as they don't even want to think about what they'd say if anyone were to bring suit against them for forced monopoly of television service!


                      All that said, however, ended when one of our Board members, on his own, simply said, why not use his home address and let him buy a second receiver for $5 a month from Dish or Direct and deliver excellent HD signals to our headend! Figuring that could land us in a heap of trouble, I suggested we go, upfront to Dish and Direct, and simply ask them.


                      Surprisingly, neither objected whatsoever, figuring those who chose to watch TV on our little translator systems, compared to their total home subscribers in the area was SO miniscule, it wouldn't cost them probably a single subscriber! Most of our audience are RV'ers and seasonal workers, and low income families who simply can't afford satellite or cable, even the smallest packages.


                      Bottom line: we're now getting all the networks, in HD at our translator TX site, courtesy of Dish (or is it Direct? forgotten...) for something like $39 a month. Of course the DTV footprint is spotbeam, so that doesn't help us when we summer at our MI home, but I can live without Denver TV for a few months, and the 'fight with the wife' ain't worth it to do a C-Band and grab the HITS crappy compressed signals up here in da UP!


                      Tom





                      -----Original Message-----
                      From: David I. Emery <die@...>
                      To: coldwarcomms <coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com>
                      Sent: Fri, Aug 19, 2011 8:56 pm
                      Subject: Re: [coldwarcomms] Northern Michigan





                      On Fri, Aug 19, 2011 at 07:38:52AM -0400, Tom Scanlan wrote:
                      > Hey Dave-

                      > Great info - thanks! Last experience I had with this was 2004, when
                      > we sold our stations. Newer house (1998) not equipped with C-band
                      > dishes, as was our place in lower Michigan. But that's my problem as
                      > they say - wife had a LOT to say about landscaping, etc. I was lucky
                      > enuf to get away with new 60' tower, still standing, still doing great
                      > duty as rotatable TV/FM reception dxing.

                      I have battles for C band here with the wife too... she likes Ku
                      dishes a lot better.

                      > Before ABC went digital, we were encripted perhaps 90% of the time.
                      > The rule was, and probably still is, that if you (as a station) had a
                      > problem with your decription gear, you'd call ABC MC's hotline and
                      > they'd switch off the encription and not turn it on until they called
                      > you or you called them to test your receiver.

                      There certainly was an era when everyone ran Leitch encryption
                      most of the time, but after the conversion to DVB digital there really
                      hasn't been much encryption used. For a while CBS and PBS used DCII
                      gear in FK mode, but even that has gone away. However the receivers
                      used do support encryption when someone gets inspired to turn it on. Fox
                      does use BISS encrypted backhauls for a lot of feeds and may well
                      eventually hard encrypt their distribution... depends I guess on how
                      worried the NFL et al gets...

                      > If that's the rule today, I'd suspect with 200+ odd affiliates for
                      > each network, and all of them having decoders, of which all it takes is
                      > one or two small stations with questionable engineers on staff, well,
                      > you get the picture!

                      I think it is currently more a matter of what you say about how
                      many folks have the required dishes and gear - not a big number anymore,
                      just a few geeky hobbyists.

                      > Although as I put 2+2 together, with 91%+ of ALL US Tv households
                      > connected to cable and satellite, of those remaining, only a sparse
                      > handful probably still have C-Band dishes and receivers, as well as
                      > newer digital receivers, does ANYONE really care if a small amount of RF
                      > geeks really get to see the network signals free?? > duh...

                      That seems to have been the bottom line during most of the post
                      2001-2002 era... also standards change, signals go from SD to HD and
                      from QPSK digital to DVB-S2 8PSK and beyond... with various color spaces
                      (4:2:2 becoming more common), codecs (H264 AVC) and audio formats and
                      finding gear to decode it all is more of a hobby/nutcase kind of
                      activity than something large numbers of folks are either interested in
                      doing or able to do.

                      C band cable channel distribution is mostly no longer available
                      to the public (at least on the original feeds to MSOs) as the Digicipher
                      consumer keystream has been shut down and more and more of the cable
                      signals are DVB-S2 and also other encryption formats (powervu), so using
                      a C band dish to watch cable channels is no longer very possible for a
                      consumer. Thus most folks have abandoned their C band dishes so the
                      actual number of people with the gear to watch network distribution is
                      limited - tiny tiny percentage - and with digital signals on the air
                      (and cable and DTH satellite) the quality advantage of watching the
                      direct distribution is much less unless you are VERY fussy and have good
                      eyes and ears and gear.

                      --
                      Dave Emery N1PRE/AE, die@... DIE Consulting, Weston, Mass 02493
                      "An empty zombie mind with a forlorn barely readable weatherbeaten
                      'For Rent' sign still vainly flapping outside on the weed encrusted pole - in
                      celebration of what could have been, but wasn't and is not to be now either."









                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Sam Etler
                      ... If you really need the Denver TV fix you could put a Slingbox somewhere and stream the video out to Michigan. I didn t put one of them in my parents house
                      Message 10 of 11 , Aug 20, 2011
                      • 0 Attachment
                        On Sat, Aug 20, 2011 at 7:41 AM, Tom Scanlan <tomandsue@...> wrote:

                        > Bottom line: we're now getting all the networks, in HD at our translator
                        > TX site, courtesy of Dish (or is it Direct? forgotten...) for something like
                        > $39 a month. Of course the DTV footprint is spotbeam, so that doesn't help
                        > us when we summer at our MI home, but I can live without Denver TV for a few
                        > months, and the 'fight with the wife' ain't worth it to do a C-Band and grab
                        > the HITS crappy compressed signals up here in da UP!
                        >

                        If you really need the Denver TV fix you could put a Slingbox somewhere and
                        stream the video out to Michigan. I didn't put one of them in my parents'
                        house in Wisconsin and I've never watched Wisconsin football games in
                        California with it. I hear it works very well though. The newer HD ones
                        would of course require more bandwidth.

                        That's pretty cool BTW about Comcast and Dish or DirecTV being OK with you
                        guys doing this stuff. If their PR people had any brains they'd cart out
                        stuff like that when they're getting crap for installers taking naps on
                        peoples' couches.

                        sam


                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Tom Scanlan
                        Sam- I ve thought about Slingbox, but haven t pursued that yet. Might do it someday. Speaking of braindead installers, when we went from SD to HD here in MI I
                        Message 11 of 11 , Aug 20, 2011
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Sam-
                          I've thought about Slingbox, but haven't pursued that yet. Might do it someday.



                          Speaking of braindead installers, when we went from SD to HD here in MI I got a good deal from Direct TV to come up and put in the HD dish. Well, the idiot couldn't get his cell phone to work, so he proceeded bang it right on our nice maple coffee table, placing a decent set of dents on it. I chewed him out, and he thenceforth simply banged it on the hearthstone of the fireplace.




                          He also bitched and griped throughout the installation about the lousy pay he was getting and the 'sorry assholes' he had to work with in the call center. I honestly think this guy must have been a plant by Direct to see how low an installer could sink in terms of decency before a customer would react.



                          Well, I reacted all right! When I got the follow up call from Direct, I went right for the jugular and asked for the supervisor, which I got connected to right away. After filling her ear with stories about the installer, I got 90 days free HBO, Showtime, sports, etc. Too bad it wasn't September....probably could have snared a free Direct Ticket for all the NFL games!




                          Tom


                          -----Original Message-----
                          From: Sam Etler <etler@...>
                          To: coldwarcomms <coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com>
                          Sent: Sat, Aug 20, 2011 8:45 am
                          Subject: Re: [coldwarcomms] Northern Michigan





                          On Sat, Aug 20, 2011 at 7:41 AM, Tom Scanlan <tomandsue@...> wrote:

                          > Bottom line: we're now getting all the networks, in HD at our translator
                          > TX site, courtesy of Dish (or is it Direct? forgotten...) for something like
                          > $39 a month. Of course the DTV footprint is spotbeam, so that doesn't help
                          > us when we summer at our MI home, but I can live without Denver TV for a few
                          > months, and the 'fight with the wife' ain't worth it to do a C-Band and grab
                          > the HITS crappy compressed signals up here in da UP!
                          >

                          If you really need the Denver TV fix you could put a Slingbox somewhere and
                          stream the video out to Michigan. I didn't put one of them in my parents'
                          house in Wisconsin and I've never watched Wisconsin football games in
                          California with it. I hear it works very well though. The newer HD ones
                          would of course require more bandwidth.

                          That's pretty cool BTW about Comcast and Dish or DirecTV being OK with you
                          guys doing this stuff. If their PR people had any brains they'd cart out
                          stuff like that when they're getting crap for installers taking naps on
                          peoples' couches.

                          sam

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]









                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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