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Coldwar seismic data

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  • vinceinwaukesha
    So heres what happened in NK. Great leader publically says do a test. Ooops it fizzled completely not a bit of fission. As an alternative to execution the
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 11, 2006
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      So heres what happened in NK. Great leader publically says do a
      test. Ooops it fizzled completely not a bit of fission. As an
      alternative to execution the following morning, the head of the
      nuclear project fills 10 rusty railroad cars with 50 tons of obsolete
      damaged or old explosives in each car, and parks them in a partially
      caved in railroad tunnel that was never repaired after the korean war
      in the 50s. This takes about 12 hours to set up, to match how late
      the supposed test was after the great leaders announcement. Western
      world announces a late test with a partial fizzle of 500 ton yield,
      little do we know it was actually conventional.

      Its an internally self consistent theory that fits the evidence. It
      can't be disproved without futher, presumably seismic, info.

      So, here's the coldwar comms angle. The only way to answer this is
      to transfer lots of seismic and mapping data around a foreign mostly
      unfriendly country.

      Is there the capability in the past, thus presumably the present, to
      upload enough covertly acquired seismic data to do 3-D seismic
      imaging like the oil companies do? If the boom was a point source it
      was a real nuke. If the boom was from a cylindrical structure
      roughly 10 feet wide and 300 feet long, it was faked.

      Next, what was the coldwar comms plan for transfering map data?
      Presumably after the big one hit, both sides would be missing all
      kinds of bridges, canals, dams, and tunnels, so old maps would be
      fairly useless. Now a days I figure they just instantly transfer
      fresh maps over the computer network, but in the cold war days what
      was the plan to distribute mapping data? Hand carried by courriers?
      Radio fax machines? The relevance to the NK bomb is in the old days
      it's probable the sesimic guys would be unable to get ahold of rail
      and mining maps even if security allowed, although now only
      institutional buracracy and stagnation would prevent the seismic guys
      from overlaying the boom on top of a transportation and mining map.
      The NKs might have used a partially caved in rail tunnel which would
      be on old maps, but they might have used a brand new mine dug last
      year that just didn't pan out so they may as well used the empty mine
      for something useful, like a faked test.

      So, the truth or not of the NK bomb can only be answered by coldwar
      comms... At least thats what I think.
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