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Re: [coldwarcomms] lots of things

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  • Steve
    That s pretty scary I remember going into my basement in Norther West Virginia during the Cuban Missle Crisis, where we had our bathroom on this curious cement
    Message 1 of 7 , Oct 2, 2006
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      That's pretty scary I remember going into my basement in Norther West
      Virginia during the Cuban Missle Crisis, where we had our bathroom on
      this curious cement floor machine shop like environment and wondering if
      my neighborhood would look like a sterile blasted landscape. I was about
      10 at the time. I always suspect it was that that got me to tell my
      father I didn't want anymore buzz cuts every week and I wanted to go the
      libnrary instead.

      Have Fun,
      Sends Steve



      blitz wrote:

      > Couldn't agree with you more Paul, my sympathies go out to them as
      > well as those soldiers who were present during the initial tests of
      > the nukes who were exposed to high levels of radiation. Its
      > unfortunate they were never prepared for it properly, (no one knew
      > isn't a real excuse) and most wound up prematurely dead from the
      > cancers they developed. Such are the fortunes of war. Sad.
      >
      > At 22:58 9/30/2006, you wrote:
      > >For the nucler blast freaks, I have a story. My late father served
      > >in the Navy in WW II. He thought his ship, the USS Marathon had
      > >been attacked by a Japanese torpedo. Not so.
      > >
      > >My brother later did research in the captured Japanese naval records
      > >and discovered they had been attacked by a 1-man suicide submarine
      > >called a Kaitan. We're splitting hairs here because the Kaitan was
      > >little more than a torpedo with a cockpit.. If you want to see a
      > >Kaitan, go the the Naval Yard in Washington because they have one on
      > display.
      > >
      > >Anyhow, I shared a few beers with my dad one day. We gradually got
      > >around to WWII. I casually asked iif he went on to Japan after his
      > >ship was repaired in Okinowa after the Kaitan attack He in turn
      > >casually said that they did so. So then I asked him where he went.
      > >
      > >He told me that they sailed into Nagasaki just two weeks after the
      > >atomic bomb was dropped. He described to me his personal
      > >recoillection of a sterile landscape devoid of human life. He
      > >described it as looking at the face of the moon. He said that here
      > >and there a steel superstructure existed. Otherwise, there was nothing.
      > >
      > >I asked him what about the radiation. He told me nobody knew about
      > >such things. Well, somebody knew about such matters. In point of
      > >fact, the military people who encountered this hazard were not told
      > >about the circumstances.
      > >
      > >Anyhow, my father survived his experience. His crew picked up the
      > >US POW';s from Corregidor and Bataan and, over the course of the
      > >one-month cruise back to San Francisco managed to nurse them back to
      > health.
      > >
      > >The members o the crew of the USS Marathon took this as a personal
      > >responsibility and a high honor.
      > >
      > >By now they have all gone to join their ancestors, but we should not
      > >forget any of them who performed such high deeds without reservation
      > >or hesitation.
      > >
      > >So when one talks about blast effects, EMP and other matters, think
      > >about the guys who actually encountered such effects without advance
      > >knowledge that such effects would happen to them. And also think
      > >about the reason why they unkonowingly encountered those effects for
      > >the benefit of the POW's who absolutely knew nothing about what was
      > going on.
      > >
      > >Please thank God for all of them, and honor their sacrifice or
      > >experience, whether or not they knew what was going on.
      > >
      > >My father was a humble man. Had I not casually asked him over a
      > >beer about what really happened, this story would never have been
      > >known. I ask only that each of you pass it on to your progeny so
      > >that successive generations will ubderstand their American heritage.
      > >
      > >Paul Rosa
      > >Harpers Ferry, West Virginia
      > >
      > > ----- Original Message -----
      > > From: blitz
      > > To: coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com <mailto:coldwarcomms%40yahoogroups.com>
      > > Sent: Saturday, September 30, 2006 2:16 PM
      > > Subject: Re: [coldwarcomms] lots of things
      > >
      > >
      > > The "we're here from the gooberment to help you" warning is STILL
      > > VERY REAL!
      > >
      > > And your issues would come from BEING downwind...but you know what's
      > > being said...one of the reasons I expect Chicago to be a major
      > > target, the prevailing winds contaminate a huge population swath
      > > along the Great Lakes.
      > >
      > > A neighboring county had the best of both worlds, they put their EOC
      > > bunker high up on a mountainside, and buried it there...water is the
      > > enemy of many a bunker....they had the advantage of natural drainage.
      > >
      > > >your main nuke issues are fallout from some place down-wind, and
      > > >defense officials coming from DC to make sure you are OK - make
      > > >sure they are not glowing before you shake hands with them.
      > > >
      > > >you are right on electric of course - you can never trust that no
      > > >matter where you are.
      > > >
      > > >doug
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >Yahoo! Groups Links
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >Yahoo! Groups Links
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
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