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REPOST: [coldwarcomms] Re: Cold War-era state/local EOCs

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  • Albert LaFrance
    ... From: John To: Sent: Friday, September 15, 2006 8:02 AM Subject: [coldwarcomms] Re: Cold War-era
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 20, 2006
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      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "John" <jks19714@...>
      To: <coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Friday, September 15, 2006 8:02 AM
      Subject: [coldwarcomms] Re: Cold War-era state/local EOCs


      Yes, I was a volunteer in the days when the full-time staff was
      seven, including the custodian! Started out as the Radiological
      Defense Officer, later the NBC Officer, then Deputy Operations
      Officer. I was part of the duty officer rotation for a number of
      years. All of this is done by full-time paid staff these days.

      I used all of the radios in the EOC at one time or another. We had
      Collins gear with 500 watt amps, IIRC, and Model 35 (?) Teletypes
      with paper-tape reader/punches. We also had a Teletype on the State
      Enforcement network (leased lines) to send all-points bulletins as
      well as another Teletype on the FEMA network on which we received
      things like the daily upper-winds forcasts used for fallout
      prediction. FEMA had a school that I attended for limited self
      maintenance so that you could perform things like tube replacement
      during/after the apocalypse.

      My desk in Ops had the NAWAS/DelWAS drop. It could get pretty busy
      during a realworld event. I was there when Reagan got shot - it was
      obvious that something was up due to the number of messages on NAWAS
      between callsigns that I had never heard before. When we turned the
      TV set on, it all became clear...

      john

      --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "Patrick" <staplesdcc@...> wrote:
      >
      > I bet that was an interesting job; The one thing that really stood
      out
      > was the small RF room, tucked in a corner. The woman who worked
      there
      > said it -was- for the governor. (this was around 2001). For friends
      > and I, Fort Duport was a good hang out place; there's still a
      security
      > guard who patrols the grounds and has a bad habit of doing his job
      > (although nicely) and chasing people away =). Are there still any
      > active facilities in the area? I'm curious as to why security guards
      > are needed for a state park.
      >
      > Here's some more images of things in the general vicinity.
      >
      > http://tinyurl.com/jx6yd Google maps view
      > http://i5.tinypic.com/2em1t0z.jpg Bunker and tower next to (is it
      part
      > of?) the EOC.
      > http://i5.tinypic.com/31690so.jpg Pillbox on top of the bunker
      > http://i8.tinypic.com/4gi7wb8.jpg A tower of some sort, to the
      > southeast of the EOC.. I've heard rumors that it dates from the
      second
      > world war when the area was used as a POW camp. is this accurate?
      >
      > Did you do any work with the comms systems that were in use?
      >
      > -patrick
      >
      >
      > --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "John" <jks19714@> wrote:
      > >
      > > If you have any questions regarding the old Delaware City EOC, I
      can
      > > probably answer them. I was the State RADEF Officer, and later
      the
      > > Deputy Operations Officer there (as a volunteer - budgets were
      thin
      > > in those days!).
      > >
      > > john
      > > W3JKS/AAT3BF/AAA9SL
      > >
      >
    • Albert LaFrance
      ... From: Patrick To: Sent: Wednesday, September 13, 2006 12:42 PM Subject: [coldwarcomms] Re: Cold
      Message 2 of 2 , Sep 21, 2006
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        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Patrick" <staplesdcc@...>
        To: <coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Wednesday, September 13, 2006 12:42 PM
        Subject: [coldwarcomms] Re: Cold War-era state/local EOCs


        I bet that was an interesting job; The one thing that really stood out
        was the small RF room, tucked in a corner. The woman who worked there
        said it -was- for the governor. (this was around 2001). For friends
        and I, Fort Duport was a good hang out place; there's still a security
        guard who patrols the grounds and has a bad habit of doing his job
        (although nicely) and chasing people away =). Are there still any
        active facilities in the area? I'm curious as to why security guards
        are needed for a state park.

        Here's some more images of things in the general vicinity.

        http://tinyurl.com/jx6yd Google maps view
        http://i5.tinypic.com/2em1t0z.jpg Bunker and tower next to (is it part
        of?) the EOC.
        http://i5.tinypic.com/31690so.jpg Pillbox on top of the bunker
        http://i8.tinypic.com/4gi7wb8.jpg A tower of some sort, to the
        southeast of the EOC.. I've heard rumors that it dates from the second
        world war when the area was used as a POW camp. is this accurate?

        Did you do any work with the comms systems that were in use?

        -patrick


        --- In coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com, "John" <jks19714@...> wrote:
        >
        > If you have any questions regarding the old Delaware City EOC, I can
        > probably answer them. I was the State RADEF Officer, and later the
        > Deputy Operations Officer there (as a volunteer - budgets were thin
        > in those days!).
        >
        > john
        > W3JKS/AAT3BF/AAA9SL
        >
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