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Re: Under-the-Patio fallout shelter

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  • Albert LaFrance
    An interesting feature of the shelter is the presence of a telephone (on the table). That s the first time I ve seen a home shelter depicted with a phone. It
    Message 1 of 6 , May 31 8:54 PM
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      An interesting feature of the shelter is the presence of a telephone (on the table). That's the
      first time I've seen a home shelter depicted with a phone.

      It brings up the question of whether, and to what extent, suburban residential phone service could
      be expected to function after a nuclear attack. Also, what patterns of calling could be expected?
      Would the calls be mostly to local emergency services and to nearby friends and neighbors, or would
      they be more likely long-distance?

      On the first question, my hypothesis would be: given the apparent suburban setting and assuming a
      blast size and distance from "ground zero" such that blast effects would be minimal, local service
      would probably be working, but severely overloaded. Continuity of service would be assured
      more by distance from the blast than by any hardening of the plant. Utility power might fail, but
      the central office's batteries and emergency engine-alternators would keep the equipment running.

      Typical suburban outside plant of the era would be lead-covered aerial cables, going underground as
      they converged on the central office, which would normally be within a few miles of the subscriber's
      location due to technical limitations on line ("local loop") length.

      And remember, back in the 1960s the family would have been paying monthly rental for that phone!

      Albert

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Albert LaFrance" <lafrance@...>
      To: "Cold War Comms list" <coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Sunday, May 21, 2006 12:43 AM
      Subject: Under-the-Patio fallout shelter


      > A very cool design combining two icons of the '60s: the patio and the fallout shelter:
      > http://coldwar-c4i.net/CD/Shelters/Home/PopMech-1961-12/p085-086.html
      >
      > Albert
      >
    • prosa@crosslink.net
      Albert: Good questions. The last time a significant earthquake hit San Francisco, as soon as the news flashed over the air, I tried calling one of my foster
      Message 2 of 6 , Jun 1, 2006
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        Albert:

        Good questions. The last time a significant earthquake hit San
        Francisco, as soon as the news flashed over the air, I tried calling
        one of my foster sons in Sausalito to see if he was ok. To my surprise
        I was able to get through and quite pleased to learn that he was
        alright. After that one call, I couldn't get through for days. As I
        understand it circuits are prioritized in favor of those in the
        disaster area so that they can call out for aid, and against people
        like me on the outside trying to call in to see what's going on.

        Also, as been discuseed in this group before, the new digital PCS
        wireless systems have the ability to give network priority to first
        responders. But things are not as simple as they seem. I was a
        consultant to Sprint when they launched the first PCS system in the
        nation on November 15, 1995 in the Washington-Baltimore MTA. To our
        surprise, we found that despite the technical ability to prioritize,
        there was a huge disagreement in the law enforcement and emergency
        services community as to who was more important.

        I mean like the Secret Service, the FBI, the Fairfax police, ATF,
        Montgomery County Emergency Services, the DC Police and a whole raft of
        other agencies think they obviously are the most important people on
        earth. When you look around, there are a boatload of agencies out
        there who provide vital services. What carrier would want to sit in
        the middle of them and referee this deal? Heck, just emergency
        services alone could saturate the Baltimore/Washington networks during
        a disaster let alone all the other customers.

        So in my view, this is sort of a wild card issue. Theory and
        technology are nice. But try and implement it and you're guaranteed to
        have a hornet's next on your hands.

        Paul Rosa
        Harpers Ferry, WV

        n Wed, 31 May 2006 23:54:03 -0400
        "Albert LaFrance" <lafrance@...> wrote:
        > An interesting feature of the shelter is the presence of a telephone
        > (on the table). That's the
        > first time I've seen a home shelter depicted with a phone.
        >
        > It brings up the question of whether, and to what extent, suburban
        > residential phone service could
        > be expected to function after a nuclear attack. Also, what patterns
        > of calling could be expected?
        > Would the calls be mostly to local emergency services and to nearby
        > friends and neighbors, or would
        > they be more likely long-distance?
        >
        > On the first question, my hypothesis would be: given the apparent
        > suburban setting and assuming a
        > blast size and distance from "ground zero" such that blast effects
        > would be minimal, local service
        > would probably be working, but severely overloaded. Continuity of
        > service would be assured
        > more by distance from the blast than by any hardening of the plant.
        > Utility power might fail, but
        > the central office's batteries and emergency engine-alternators would
        > keep the equipment running.
        >
        > Typical suburban outside plant of the era would be lead-covered
        > aerial cables, going underground as
        > they converged on the central office, which would normally be within
        > a few miles of the subscriber's
        > location due to technical limitations on line ("local loop") length.
        >
        > And remember, back in the 1960s the family would have been paying
        > monthly rental for that phone!
        >
        > Albert
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: "Albert LaFrance" <lafrance@...>
        > To: "Cold War Comms list" <coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com>
        > Sent: Sunday, May 21, 2006 12:43 AM
        > Subject: Under-the-Patio fallout shelter
        >
        >
        > > A very cool design combining two icons of the '60s: the patio and
        > the fallout shelter:
        > >
        > http://coldwar-c4i.net/CD/Shelters/Home/PopMech-1961-12/p085-086.html
        > >
        > > Albert
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        >
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      • Steve Kudlak
        Artists asked to depict something seldom ask detailed technical questions. They are often given instructions like make it look as homey as possible: and that
        Message 3 of 6 , Jun 3, 2006
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          Artists asked to depict something seldom ask detailed technical
          questions. They are often given instructions like "make it look as homey
          as possible: and that is pretty much what they do. What interests me
          about fallout shelters is that although would have been useless in all
          out global warm but they have come in very useful in more vanilla
          natural disasters. Onecan gain e3ffective protection from Hurricanes and
          Tornadoes in old fallout shelters. So overall althought they never
          served the purpose envisioned they do serve a useful purpose even today
          many years after they were built and planned.

          Have Fun,
          Sends Steve



          Albert LaFrance wrote:

          >An interesting feature of the shelter is the presence of a telephone (on the table). That's the
          >first time I've seen a home shelter depicted with a phone.
          >
          >It brings up the question of whether, and to what extent, suburban residential phone service could
          >be expected to function after a nuclear attack. Also, what patterns of calling could be expected?
          >Would the calls be mostly to local emergency services and to nearby friends and neighbors, or would
          >they be more likely long-distance?
          >
          >On the first question, my hypothesis would be: given the apparent suburban setting and assuming a
          >blast size and distance from "ground zero" such that blast effects would be minimal, local service
          >would probably be working, but severely overloaded. Continuity of service would be assured
          >more by distance from the blast than by any hardening of the plant. Utility power might fail, but
          >the central office's batteries and emergency engine-alternators would keep the equipment running.
          >
          >Typical suburban outside plant of the era would be lead-covered aerial cables, going underground as
          >they converged on the central office, which would normally be within a few miles of the subscriber's
          >location due to technical limitations on line ("local loop") length.
          >
          >And remember, back in the 1960s the family would have been paying monthly rental for that phone!
          >
          >Albert
          >
          >----- Original Message -----
          >From: "Albert LaFrance" <lafrance@...>
          >To: "Cold War Comms list" <coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com>
          >Sent: Sunday, May 21, 2006 12:43 AM
          >Subject: Under-the-Patio fallout shelter
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >>A very cool design combining two icons of the '60s: the patio and the fallout shelter:
          >>http://coldwar-c4i.net/CD/Shelters/Home/PopMech-1961-12/p085-086.html
          >>
          >>Albert
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • james kester
          another useful purpose was that they engaged a government employee to think, and read! which is something that is still sorely needed today. i have a copy of
          Message 4 of 6 , Jun 4, 2006
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            another useful purpose was that they engaged a government employee to think, and read! which is something that is still sorely needed today.
            i have a copy of a publication dated 1957 illustrating various types of
            shelters. car shelter, stick shelter, etc.. it's priceless, since the artist also
            depicts the individual in each example and illustration.
            if i can locate it, i'll post it.

            Steve Kudlak <stevex11@...> wrote: Artists asked to depict something seldom ask detailed technical
            questions. They are often given instructions like "make it look as homey
            as possible: and that is pretty much what they do. What interests me
            about fallout shelters is that although would have been useless in all
            out global warm but they have come in very useful in more vanilla
            natural disasters. Onecan gain e3ffective protection from Hurricanes and
            Tornadoes in old fallout shelters. So overall althought they never
            served the purpose envisioned they do serve a useful purpose even today
            many years after they were built and planned.

            Have Fun,
            Sends Steve



            Albert LaFrance wrote:

            >An interesting feature of the shelter is the presence of a telephone (on the table). That's the
            >first time I've seen a home shelter depicted with a phone.
            >
            >It brings up the question of whether, and to what extent, suburban residential phone service could
            >be expected to function after a nuclear attack. Also, what patterns of calling could be expected?
            >Would the calls be mostly to local emergency services and to nearby friends and neighbors, or would
            >they be more likely long-distance?
            >
            >On the first question, my hypothesis would be: given the apparent suburban setting and assuming a
            >blast size and distance from "ground zero" such that blast effects would be minimal, local service
            >would probably be working, but severely overloaded. Continuity of service would be assured
            >more by distance from the blast than by any hardening of the plant. Utility power might fail, but
            >the central office's batteries and emergency engine-alternators would keep the equipment running.
            >
            >Typical suburban outside plant of the era would be lead-covered aerial cables, going underground as
            >they converged on the central office, which would normally be within a few miles of the subscriber's
            >location due to technical limitations on line ("local loop") length.
            >
            >And remember, back in the 1960s the family would have been paying monthly rental for that phone!
            >
            >Albert
            >
            >----- Original Message -----
            >From: "Albert LaFrance" <lafrance@...>
            >To: "Cold War Comms list" <coldwarcomms@yahoogroups.com>
            >Sent: Sunday, May 21, 2006 12:43 AM
            >Subject: Under-the-Patio fallout shelter
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >>A very cool design combining two icons of the '60s: the patio and the fallout shelter:
            >>http://coldwar-c4i.net/CD/Shelters/Home/PopMech-1961-12/p085-086.html
            >>
            >>Albert
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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