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Re: Article: Microfluidic chambers advance the science of growing neurons

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  • Dr. David Deal
    as i was reading this post i kept thinking this is extremely difficult work this lab is doing. also even thought exactly what ralph nuzzo said... it s about
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 1, 2007
      as i was reading this post i kept thinking this is extremely
      difficult work this lab is doing. also even thought exactly what
      ralph nuzzo said...
      "it's about impossible for one lab to do all this." i'll say. i've
      had these thoughts...even put them on paper but lacked the kind of
      paper it really takes, i.e., currency. but one point they make i have
      wrote in group it takes an effort from those of many different
      scientific, engineering & technological backgrounds of expertise. i
      have complained for many, many years about the too highly specialized
      efforts of science toiling in near isolation from the sci-com. it is
      heartening to see these trends reversing. i have met experts in a
      specific sub-field that outside that parameter know next to nothing
      about anything else. generally they try to steer the conversation
      back to only what they know. very frustrating.
      science ain't cheap :)
      ddd



      --- In cognitiveneuroscienceforum@yahoogroups.com, "Robert Karl
      Stonjek" <stonjek@...> wrote:
      >
      > Microfluidic chambers advance the science of growing neurons
      >
      > Researchers at the University of Illinois have developed a method
      for culturing mammalian neurons in chambers not much larger than the
      neurons themselves. The new approach extends the lifespan of the
      neurons at very low densities, an essential step toward developing a
      method for studying the growth and behavior of individual brain cells.
      >
      > The technique is described this month in the journal of the Royal
      Society of Chemistry - Lab on a Chip.
      >
      > "This finding will be very positively greeted by the neuroscience
      community," said Martha Gillette, who is an author on the study and
      the head of the cell and developmental biology department at
      Illinois. "This is pushing the limits of what you can do with neurons
      in culture."
      >
      > Growing viable mammalian neurons at low density in an artificial
      environment is no easy task. Using postnatal neurons only adds to the
      challenge, Gillette said, because these cells are extremely sensitive
      to environmental conditions.
      >
      <snip>
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