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Re: [Cognitive Neuroscience Forum] Re: Intro with QUESTION

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  • Rose Lieberman
    Hi, Ben. Thank you so much for that information. I ve just requested it from my library. The article seems pretty close to what I m asking about. And having
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 31, 2005
      Hi, Ben. Thank you so much for that information. I've just requested it from my library.

      The article seems pretty close to what I'm asking about. And having thought about this further for the past couple of days, I guess I could pose my question as follows:

      1. Did my abusive childhood create a left-brain dominance? For example, the developing hypervigilence which keeps me in survival mode - as a child and later as an adult - would seem to be a left brain activity.

      2. When I try to pursue right-brained activities, spiritual paths, etc., I am usually undone by intellectualism, overrationalization, to the point of self-sabotage of anything that is creative, spiritual, etc.

      3. How can a person like me develop a confidence in right brain vision and perspective, and not allow the left brain to step in and overpower it?

      Even though I have nothing to be afraid of and I'm not consciously afraid of anything, the hypervigilence is still there. When I'm feeling calm and safe enough to embrace a more altruistic pursuit, that left brain comes in and undoes me completely. I just need to know how to "convince" myself that this left brain which saved me many times, is now doing too good of a job!

      Anyway, that's what leads me to this group and now to Schore, thanks to you.

      I hope all that made sense.

      Rose




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • guinnessforstrength_1
      Hey Rose, The Schore reference is a good one - there are several researchers looking at emotions and valence of brain activity. I m glad you elaborated though
      Message 2 of 2 , Sep 15, 2005
        Hey Rose,
        The Schore reference is a good one - there are several researchers
        looking at emotions and valence of brain activity. I'm glad you
        elaborated though with your numbered questions. I recently went to
        a topics presentation about Positive Psychology - your questions
        made me think of that model. Put that in the search engines and see
        what you come up with. The woman who spoke, Lindsay Gibson, Psy.D,
        wrote a book (I'm sorry I don't have the title), but also presented
        a very visual and visceral description of positive psychology.

        Ms. Gibson spoke about a survivor's metaphor - specifically
        adventurers and explorers like Shackleton, Robert Scott, and Mawson -
        those men who explored Antarctica and such places. Their stories
        were used as the metaphor - survival vs. victims. Ms. Gibson spoke
        about how cognitive beliefs of perserverance, hope, and proactive
        thoughts contributed to the great survivors, while the helpless and
        hopeless "doomsday" thoughts were adopted by victims. This is all
        related to survivors of trauma and the beliefs that they adopt and
        bring into adulthood. I am an art therapist and truly believe that
        through experiential and honest self-exploration, people can grasp
        who they are in order to construct who they want to be.

        There is also literature on how you can develop left - right brain
        connectivity through art work (hence, the allusion to art therapy).
        Your question in number 2 concerns me a tad in that it sounds like
        you are attempting to MAKE yourself do more spiritual things, inner
        reflection ("right-brainedness") - I think the need for control is
        indicative of some of the adult constructs of your traumatic past.
        It may be that more expressive psychotherapy can assist you with
        going back and nurturing back to full health your inner damaged
        child in order to lead you back to a path of greater healing.

        Art Therapy, Jungian Analysis, psychotherapy, victim work, survivors
        group... and check out Positive Psychology. I have a masters in art
        therapy and have done my thesis work in neuroscience. My work is in
        studying the effect of art work on the brain. I have presented my
        thesis work at the American Art Therapy Association national
        conference and will be presenting again in Iceland 2006 at the
        Nordic Art Therapy conference: The Effect of Art Creation on the
        Brain.

        Kerry Kruk, MS



        --- In cognitiveneuroscienceforum@yahoogroups.com, "Rose Lieberman"
        <lapis@c...> wrote:
        > Hi, Ben. Thank you so much for that information. I've just
        requested it from my library.
        >
        > The article seems pretty close to what I'm asking about. And
        having thought about this further for the past couple of days, I
        guess I could pose my question as follows:
        >
        > 1. Did my abusive childhood create a left-brain dominance? For
        example, the developing hypervigilence which keeps me in survival
        mode - as a child and later as an adult - would seem to be a left
        brain activity.
        >
        > 2. When I try to pursue right-brained activities, spiritual
        paths, etc., I am usually undone by intellectualism,
        overrationalization, to the point of self-sabotage of anything that
        is creative, spiritual, etc.
        >
        > 3. How can a person like me develop a confidence in right brain
        vision and perspective, and not allow the left brain to step in and
        overpower it?
        >
        > Even though I have nothing to be afraid of and I'm not consciously
        afraid of anything, the hypervigilence is still there. When I'm
        feeling calm and safe enough to embrace a more altruistic pursuit,
        that left brain comes in and undoes me completely. I just need to
        know how to "convince" myself that this left brain which saved me
        many times, is now doing too good of a job!
        >
        > Anyway, that's what leads me to this group and now to Schore,
        thanks to you.
        >
        > I hope all that made sense.
        >
        > Rose
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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