Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

SCR: The Scientific Consciousness Community Mourns the Loss of Francis Crick

Expand Messages
  • Thomas Zoëga Ramsøy
    ================================== SCIENCE & CONSCIOUSNESS REVIEW SCI-CON.ORG NEWSLETTER ================================== August 4, 2004 ARTICLES IN THIS
    Message 1 of 1 , Aug 3, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      ==================================
      SCIENCE & CONSCIOUSNESS REVIEW
      SCI-CON.ORG NEWSLETTER
      ==================================

      August 4, 2004

      ARTICLES IN THIS ISSUE
      ==================================
      1. SCR Feature - The Scientific Consciousness Community Mourns the
      Loss of Francis Crick
      2. How the brain can be fooled into feeling a fake limb
      3. Neuroscience: Change of mind
      4. Why do we sleep?
      5. VR Tool Re-Creates Hallucinations
      6. Self-recognition in everyday life
      7. New Issue of NeuroImage
      __________________________________________________
      _______________________
      __________________________________________________
      _______________________

      ************************
      1. The Scientific Consciousness Community Mourns the Loss of Francis
      Crick
      Original to SCR
      ************************
      **The scientific consciousness community mourns the loss of Francis
      Crick, the co-discoverer of DNA, who devoted the last several decades
      of his life to the quest for understanding consciousness and its brain
      basis. Crick successfully encouraged new experimental research, and in
      collaboration with Christof Koch, developed testable hypotheses about
      the brain basis of conscious experience. He helped rescue the topic
      from an undeserved negative reputation and did much to return it to
      the forefront of scientific interest. His quick and penetrating mind,
      kindness to others and leadership in the field will be sorely
      missed.**

      Read More: http://www.sci-con.org/news/articles/20040703.html
      <http://www.sci-con.org/articles/20040601.html>
      __________________________________________________
      _______________________
      __________________________________________________
      _______________________

      ************************
      2. How the brain can be fooled into feeling a fake limb
      EurekAlert
      ************************

      Stories of amputees feeling phantom limbs is common place, however
      Henrik Ehrsson of University College London identify fake limbs as
      part of their own body. The study argues that distinguishing the self
      from non-self is done by comparing information from multiple senses
      and that this distinction is merely an illusion created by the brain.

      Read More:
      http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2004-07/ucl-tnm062904.php
      __________________________________________________
      _______________________
      __________________________________________________
      _______________________

      ************************
      3. Neuroscience: Change of mind
      Nature.com
      ************************

      Report of a case of a Liverpool patient who after a cerebral hemorage
      turned from violent convict to a compulsive and creative artist.

      Read More:
      http://www.nature.com/cgitaf/Dynapage.taf?file=/na
      ture/journal/v430/n6995/full/430014a_fs.html

      __________________________________________________
      _______________________
      __________________________________________________
      _______________________

      ************************
      4. Why do we sleep?
      Nature.com
      ************************

      The July issue of Nature has a special focus on sleep and cites two
      articles as shedding light on the issue.

      Local sleep and learning
      Human sleep is a global state whose functions remain unclear. During
      much of sleep, cortical neurons undergo slow oscillations in membrane
      potential, which appear in electroencephalograms as slow wave activity
      (SWA) of <4 Hz. The amount of SWA is homeostatically regulated,
      increasing after wakefulness and returning to baseline during sleep.
      It has been suggested that SWA homeostasis may reflect synaptic
      changes underlying a cellular need for sleep. If this were so,
      inducing local synaptic changes should induce local SWA changes, and
      these should benefit neural function. Here we show that sleep
      homeostasis indeed has a local component, which can be triggered by a
      learning task involving specific brain regions. Furthermore, we show
      that the local increase in SWA after learning correlates with improved
      performance of the task after sleep. Thus, sleep homeostasis can be
      induced on a local level and can benefit performance.

      http://phy.ucsf.edu/~idl/pdf_articles/Tonini_Nature_2004.pdf


      Neurobiology: Sleep on it
      Is the function of sleep to replenish energy resources or to modify
      neural connections in the brain? Recordings of the brain's
      'reverberating circuits' evident during sleep shed light on the
      question.

      http://phy.ucsf.edu/~idl/pdf_articles/Tononi_Natur
      e_NV_2004_files/DynaPage_002.htm


      Read More:
      http://www.nature.com/nature/links/040701/040701-1.html

      __________________________________________________
      _______________________
      __________________________________________________
      _______________________

      ************************
      5. VR Tool Re-Creates Hallucinations
      Technology Research News
      *************************

      Based on patient interviews, researchers from University of Queensland
      in Australia have created a virtual reality environment to allow
      psychiatrists to understand what it is like to have hallucinations.
      Descriptions of the hallucinations are gained from the patients, and
      then recreated in software.

      Read More:
      http://www.trnmag.com/Stories/2004/061604/VR_tool_
      re-creates_hallucinations_061604.html

      __________________________________________________
      _______________________
      __________________________________________________
      _______________________

      ************************
      6. Self-recognition in everyday life
      Serge Brédart & Andrew Young
      University of Liège Belgium, University of York UK
      ************************

      Introduction: A sample of everyday difficulties was collected,
      encompassing errors and unusual experiences participants had
      encountered when recognising their own faces in everyday life, with
      the aim of characterising similarities and differences between the
      reported difficulties and the major forms of self-recognition
      impairments described in the neuropsychological and neuropsychiatric
      literatures (prosopagnosia, mirrored-self misidentification, and
      Capgras delusion).

      Method. A total of 70 participants recalled experiences from memory.
      Incidents (n = 51) were recorded on questionnaire sheets that were
      filled out at home. Reports of three categories of incidents were
      analysed: misidentifications (the participant misidentified her/his
      own face as being that of another familiar person; n = 5), recognition
      failures (the participant judged that his/her own face was that of an
      unfamiliar person; n = 20) and perception of unusual aspects (the
      participant confidently recognised his/her own face but found that the
      seen face did not fit well the representation she/he had of his/her
      own face; n = 26).

      Results and discussion. In the reported incidents, experiences showing
      some similarities to those of patients with prosopagnosia, Capgras
      delusion or mirrored self misidentification were noted. However,
      across the whole study, no incident involved a failure of reality
      testing; in contrast to pathological forms of error, in all of the
      reported incidents from our study the participant realised that a
      mistake had been made. The importance of decision processes in
      pathological forms of own-face misrecognition is discussed.

      Read More:
      http://tinyurl.com/6zzgm [Ingenta.com]

      __________________________________________________
      _______________________
      __________________________________________________
      _______________________

      ************************
      7. New Issue of NeuroImage, April 2004
      ************************

      Contents of this Issue:

      The neural substrates of conscious color perception demonstrated using
      fMRI
      Tomoyo Morita, Takanori Kochiyama, Tomohisa Okada, Yoshiharu Yonekura,
      Michikazu Matsumura and Norihiro Sadato

      Human MT+ mediates perceptual filling-in during apparent motion
      Taosheng Liu, Scott D. Slotnick and Steven Yantis

      Brain areas and time course of emotional processing
      M. Esslen, R. D. Pascual-Marqui, D. Hell, K. Kochi and D. Lehmann

      Activation of the amygdala and anterior cingulate during
      nonconscious\processing of sad versus happy faces
      William D. S. Killgore and Deborah A. Yurgelun-Todd

      Functional-anatomic correlates of remembering and knowing
      Mark E. Wheeler and Randy L. Buckner

      Willed action and attention to the selection of action
      H. C. Lau, R. D. Rogers, N. Ramnani and R. E. Passingham

      Differential neural responses to overt and covert presentations of
      facial expressions of fear and disgust
      Mary L. Phillips, Leanne M. Williams, Maike Heining, Catherine M.
      Herba,
      Tamara Russell, Christopher Andrew, Ed T. Bullmore, Michael J. Brammer

      Read More:
      http://tinyurl.com/5sho6 [ScienceDirect]

      __________________________________________________
      _______________________
      __________________________________________________
      _______________________
      Science and Consciousness Review <http://www.sci-con.org>
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.