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Impact of "Code-Switching" on Raising Bilingual Children

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  • bonnieliao@comcast.net
    Hi, I m Bonnie Liao. I m glad that I ve found this group. It is my interest to find out the impact of code-switching on raising bilingual children. Years
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 1, 2003
      Hi,

      I'm Bonnie Liao. I'm glad that I've found this group. It is my interest to find out the impact of "code-switching" on raising bilingual children.

      Years ago, I heard it in a radio program that parents should NOT "code-switch" when talking to bilingual children. Instead, it was suggested that one language be associated with specific settings - specific people (e.g., grandparents), specific environment (e.g., at home), or even specific time of the day (e.g., dinner time) - when raising bi- or multi-lingual
      children and that parents only speak "pure" language minimizing code-switching.

      This is what I have been practicing with my children and what I have been telling other bilingual parents. I'm interested in any new/different findings on this subject. Intuitively I'd think the less "code-switching" in conversations in either language, the better will be the results in raising bilingual children. However, I wonder if there's been any research foundation to support this. If not, I wonder if parents could be more relaxed about "code-switching." For now, I've been emphasizing the importance of language-setting association and encouraging them to minimize code-switching.

      Any thoughts on this? Thanks!



      Regards,
      Bonnie Liao, Principal
      YingHua Language School
      www.yinghua.org




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    • neeraja raghupathi
      Hello Bonnie Liao!!! I am a post graduate student in speech, language and hearing sciences. I right now finished with my research on bilingualism and
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 1, 2003
        Hello Bonnie Liao!!!
        I am a post graduate student in speech, language and hearing sciences. I right now finished with my research on bilingualism and stuttering. Practically, when I work with multilingual children with language disorders, I advise them to follow the principle " One person, one language". And with childhood stutterers, I start my therapy in the language in which the child is having greater proficiency and once the child becomes fluent in his/her dominant language, I would shift to the non-dominant language. In the initial stage, I would ask the parents to strictly use the dominant language at home and at the later stage, they would use both the languages. I have found this personally effective with many of the bilingual stutterers.
        But I would like to know what can be done to generalize the therapy techniques from one language to another in case of adults. I would really welcome your suggestions on this issue.
        Wish you a very Happy New Year!!
        Regards,
        Neeraja


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