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  • MoNa A
    Greetings to you all You might find my questions rather stupid... but I guess I need to know a bit about them anyway... so bear with me please... 1) Is there
    Message 1 of 15 , Aug 5, 2001
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      Greetings to you all

      You might find my questions rather stupid... but I guess I need to know a
      bit about them anyway... so bear with me please...

      1) Is there any difference what so ever between "codeswitching", "code
      switching" and "code-switching'? Different researchers seem to use a
      different spelling of the term so I only wondered why... or like why isn't
      there a unified spelling for the term?

      2) Are motivations for code switching any different from the functions of
      code switching? Again researchers seem to use them to some degree
      interchangeably...

      Thank you once again for bearing with me :)
      Mona A
    • Petek Kurtboke
      ... know a ... a bit more self-confidence... we re here to shape the sixth generation code-switching researchers so it s your right to ask - whether you get
      Message 2 of 15 , Aug 6, 2001
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        --- In code-switching@y..., MoNa A <mona2010@b...> wrote:
        > Greetings to you all
        >
        > You might find my questions rather stupid... but I guess I need to
        know a
        > bit about them anyway... so bear with me please...

        a bit more self-confidence... we're here to shape the sixth
        generation code-switching researchers so it's your right to ask -
        whether you get any answers from senior cs researchers is of course a
        different matter - that's my personal view of course.


        >
        > 1) Is there any difference what so ever
        between "codeswitching", "code
        > switching" and "code-switching'? Different researchers seem to use a
        > different spelling of the term so I only wondered why... or like
        >why isn't there a unified spelling for the term?

        if you check the early exchanges to the list you'll find that this
        question was debated and no unified spelling was reached - use the
        one of your liking and never ask anyone (even your supervisor, who
        might be equally confused!)

        >
        > 2) Are motivations for code switching any different from the
        > functions of code switching? Again researchers seem to use them to
        > some degree interchangeably...

        who?

        >
        > Thank you once again for bearing with me :)
        > Mona A

        good luck

        Petek :-)))
      • Celso Alvarez Cáccamo
        Mona, Thanks for your message. ... I am not by any means one of the senior code-switching researchers that Petek mentions, but I have a feeling that the
        Message 3 of 15 , Aug 8, 2001
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          Mona,
          Thanks for your message.

          MoNa A wrote:

          >1) Is there any difference what so ever between "codeswitching", "code
          >switching" and "code-switching'? Different researchers seem to use a
          >different spelling of the term so I only wondered why... or like why isn't
          >there a unified spelling for the term?

          I am not by any means one of the "senior" code-switching researchers that
          Petek mentions, but I have a feeling that the hyphenated vs non-hyphenated
          versions of CS don't mean the same. "Codeswitching", as a lexicalized
          expression, seems to imply that we're dealing with a very clearly delimited
          structural phenomenon. On its part, to me "code-switching" implies that
          there are "codes" that are "switched", and that the speaker *effects* those
          changes by actively "switching" ("codes" cannot "switch" by themselves).
          That is, "code-switching" is much closer to the original (Jakobson's)
          "switch of codes" as a psychological phenomenon..

          -celso
          Celso Alvarez Cáccamo
          lxalvarz@...
        • Petek Kurtboke
          Hey Mona, see why there is no unified term as such...I personally don t read all those conceptual differences in that hypen. Hey Celso, what about the
          Message 4 of 15 , Aug 9, 2001
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            Hey Mona, see why there is no unified term as such...I personally
            don't read all those conceptual differences in that hypen.

            Hey Celso, what about the abbreviation CS, is there an embedded hypen
            in there or not?



            --- In code-switching@y..., Celso Alvarez Cáccamo <lxalvarz@u...>
            wrote:
            >
            > Mona,
            > Thanks for your message.
            >
            > MoNa A wrote:
            >
            > >1) Is there any difference what so ever
            between "codeswitching", "code
            > >switching" and "code-switching'? Different researchers seem to use
            a
            > >different spelling of the term so I only wondered why... or like
            why isn't
            > >there a unified spelling for the term?
            >
            > I am not by any means one of the "senior" code-switching
            researchers that
            > Petek mentions, but I have a feeling that the hyphenated vs non-
            hyphenated
            > versions of CS don't mean the same. "Codeswitching", as a
            lexicalized
            > expression, seems to imply that we're dealing with a very clearly
            delimited
            > structural phenomenon. On its part, to me "code-switching" implies
            that
            > there are "codes" that are "switched", and that the speaker
            *effects* those
            > changes by actively "switching" ("codes" cannot "switch" by
            themselves).
            > That is, "code-switching" is much closer to the original
            (Jakobson's)
            > "switch of codes" as a psychological phenomenon..
            >
            > -celso
            > Celso Alvarez Cáccamo
            > lxalvarz@u...
          • carsten_otto@yahoo.com
            ... to know a ... codeswitching , code ... to use a ... why isn t ... Dear Mona, as far as I can see, there s no difference between the hyphenated and the
            Message 5 of 15 , Aug 9, 2001
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              --- In code-switching@y..., MoNa A <mona2010@b...> wrote:
              > Greetings to you all
              >
              > You might find my questions rather stupid... but I guess I need
              to know a
              > bit about them anyway... so bear with me please...
              >
              > 1) Is there any difference what so ever between
              "codeswitching", "code
              > switching" and "code-switching'? Different researchers seem
              to use a
              > different spelling of the term so I only wondered why... or like
              why isn't
              > there a unified spelling for the term?
              >

              Dear Mona,

              as far as I can see, there's no difference between the
              hyphenated and the non-hyphenated form, as it simply
              describes the same phenomenon. Note that Crystal
              (Encyclopedia of Language, CUP 1997:423) uses the
              non-hyphenated form whereas Li Wei (The Bilingualism Reader,
              Routledge 2000:494) uses the hyphenated form defining the
              same thing: "the alternate use of two languages" (LW) or "
              changing from the use of one language to another" (C).
              But anyway I think the more widespread form is the hyphenated
              one which is used by scholars such as Poplack, Myers-Scotton,
              Muysken as well as by Blom and Gumperz.

              Cheers,

              Carsten Otto
            • azlinawati saleh
              i agree to Carston. ... __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Make international calls for as low as $.04/minute with Yahoo!
              Message 6 of 15 , Aug 9, 2001
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                i agree to Carston.
                --- carsten_otto@... wrote:
                > --- In code-switching@y..., MoNa A <mona2010@b...>
                > wrote:
                > > Greetings to you all
                > >
                > > You might find my questions rather stupid... but I
                > guess I need
                > to know a
                > > bit about them anyway... so bear with me please...
                > >
                > > 1) Is there any difference what so ever between
                > "codeswitching", "code
                > > switching" and "code-switching'? Different
                > researchers seem
                > to use a
                > > different spelling of the term so I only wondered
                > why... or like
                > why isn't
                > > there a unified spelling for the term?
                > >
                >
                > Dear Mona,
                >
                > as far as I can see, there's no difference between
                > the
                > hyphenated and the non-hyphenated form, as it simply
                >
                > describes the same phenomenon. Note that Crystal
                > (Encyclopedia of Language, CUP 1997:423) uses the
                > non-hyphenated form whereas Li Wei (The Bilingualism
                > Reader,
                > Routledge 2000:494) uses the hyphenated form
                > defining the
                > same thing: "the alternate use of two languages"
                > (LW) or "
                > changing from the use of one language to another"
                > (C).
                > But anyway I think the more widespread form is the
                > hyphenated
                > one which is used by scholars such as Poplack,
                > Myers-Scotton,
                > Muysken as well as by Blom and Gumperz.
                >
                > Cheers,
                >
                > Carsten Otto
                >
                >


                __________________________________________________
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              • azlinawati saleh
                funny answer. ... __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Make international calls for as low as $.04/minute with Yahoo! Messenger
                Message 7 of 15 , Aug 9, 2001
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                  funny answer.
                  --- Petek Kurtboke <pkurtboke@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hey Mona, see why there is no unified term as
                  > such...I personally
                  > don't read all those conceptual differences in that
                  > hypen.
                  >
                  > Hey Celso, what about the abbreviation CS, is there
                  > an embedded hypen
                  > in there or not?
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > --- In code-switching@y..., Celso Alvarez C�ccamo
                  > <lxalvarz@u...>
                  > wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Mona,
                  > > Thanks for your message.
                  > >
                  > > MoNa A wrote:
                  > >
                  > > >1) Is there any difference what so ever
                  > between "codeswitching", "code
                  > > >switching" and "code-switching'? Different
                  > researchers seem to use
                  > a
                  > > >different spelling of the term so I only wondered
                  > why... or like
                  > why isn't
                  > > >there a unified spelling for the term?
                  > >
                  > > I am not by any means one of the "senior"
                  > code-switching
                  > researchers that
                  > > Petek mentions, but I have a feeling that the
                  > hyphenated vs non-
                  > hyphenated
                  > > versions of CS don't mean the same.
                  > "Codeswitching", as a
                  > lexicalized
                  > > expression, seems to imply that we're dealing with
                  > a very clearly
                  > delimited
                  > > structural phenomenon. On its part, to me
                  > "code-switching" implies
                  > that
                  > > there are "codes" that are "switched", and that
                  > the speaker
                  > *effects* those
                  > > changes by actively "switching" ("codes" cannot
                  > "switch" by
                  > themselves).
                  > > That is, "code-switching" is much closer to the
                  > original
                  > (Jakobson's)
                  > > "switch of codes" as a psychological phenomenon..
                  > >
                  > > -celso
                  > > Celso Alvarez C�ccamo
                  > > lxalvarz@u...
                  >
                  >


                  __________________________________________________
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                  Make international calls for as low as $.04/minute with Yahoo! Messenger
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                • Petek Kurtboke
                  ... Hey Otto, il ya beaucoup de difference entre widespread and used by scholars such as.... , to me at least. LET THE 6TH GENERATION BE FREE FROM
                  Message 8 of 15 , Aug 10, 2001
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                    --- In code-switching@y..., carsten_otto@y... wrote:
                    > --- In code-switching@y..., MoNa A <mona2010@b...> wrote:
                    > > Greetings to you all
                    > >
                    > > You might find my questions rather stupid... but I guess I need
                    > to know a
                    > > bit about them anyway... so bear with me please...
                    > >
                    > > 1) Is there any difference what so ever between
                    > "codeswitching", "code
                    > > switching" and "code-switching'? Different researchers seem
                    > to use a
                    > > different spelling of the term so I only wondered why... or like
                    > why isn't
                    > > there a unified spelling for the term?
                    > >
                    >
                    > Dear Mona,
                    >
                    > as far as I can see, there's no difference between the
                    > hyphenated and the non-hyphenated form, as it simply
                    > describes the same phenomenon. Note that Crystal
                    > (Encyclopedia of Language, CUP 1997:423) uses the
                    > non-hyphenated form whereas Li Wei (The Bilingualism Reader,
                    > Routledge 2000:494) uses the hyphenated form defining the
                    > same thing: "the alternate use of two languages" (LW) or "
                    > changing from the use of one language to another" (C).



                    > But anyway I think the more widespread form is the hyphenated
                    > one which is used by scholars such as Poplack, Myers-Scotton,
                    > Muysken as well as by Blom and Gumperz.
                    >
                    > Cheers,
                    >
                    > Carsten Otto



                    Hey Otto, il ya beaucoup de difference entre "widespread" and
                    "used by scholars such as....", to me at least.
                    LET THE 6TH GENERATION BE FREE FROM ARSE-LICKING!

                    Cheers
                    Petek
                  • Celso Alvarez Cáccamo
                    ... I suppose it might, or it might not. CS could stand for Code Switching (just as SLA stands for Second Language Acquisition) or for Code-Switching (just
                    Message 9 of 15 , Aug 11, 2001
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                      Petek Kurtboke wrote:

                      >Hey Celso, what about the abbreviation CS, is there an embedded hypen
                      >in there or not?

                      I suppose it might, or it might not. CS could stand for 'Code Switching'
                      (just as SLA stands for Second Language Acquisition) or for
                      'Code-Switching' (just as FTA = Face-Threatening Act). At any rate, I
                      suppose CS cannot stand for 'codeswitching',which is just one word; to my
                      knowledge, single words cannot have two initials ;-) .

                      Why do you ask?

                      Celso Álvarez Cáccamo
                      lxalvarz@...
                      http://www.udc.es/dep/lx/cac
                    • Petek Kurtboke
                      thanks for that Celso! My concern is really something else... a field of study where a hyphen is turned into a pressure tool or perhaps a symbol of group
                      Message 10 of 15 , Aug 11, 2001
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                        thanks for that Celso!

                        My concern is really something else...

                        a field of study where a hyphen is turned into a pressure tool or
                        perhaps a symbol of group membership has problems.




                        --- In code-switching@y..., Celso Alvarez Cáccamo <lxalvarz@u...>
                        wrote:
                        >
                        > Petek Kurtboke wrote:
                        >
                        > >Hey Celso, what about the abbreviation CS, is there an embedded
                        hypen
                        > >in there or not?
                        >
                        > I suppose it might, or it might not. CS could stand for 'Code
                        Switching'
                        > (just as SLA stands for Second Language Acquisition) or for
                        > 'Code-Switching' (just as FTA = Face-Threatening Act). At any rate,
                        I
                        > suppose CS cannot stand for 'codeswitching',which is just one word;
                        to my
                        > knowledge, single words cannot have two initials ;-) .
                        >
                        > Why do you ask?
                        >
                        > Celso Álvarez Cáccamo
                        > lxalvarz@u...
                        > http://www.udc.es/dep/lx/cac
                      • lxalvarz@udc.es
                        ... Petek, take it easy. I know that the 6th Generation is so important for the Entire World that it will be able to erradicate global misery, epidemics,
                        Message 11 of 15 , Aug 11, 2001
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                          --- In code-switching@y..., "Petek Kurtboke" <pkurtboke@h...> wrote:

                          > Hey Otto, il ya beaucoup de difference entre "widespread" and
                          > "used by scholars such as....", to me at least.
                          > LET THE 6TH GENERATION BE FREE FROM ARSE-LICKING!

                          Petek, take it easy. I know that the 6th Generation is so
                          important for the Entire World that it will be able to
                          erradicate global misery, epidemics, sexual slavery, and child
                          slavery. But Carsten only mentioned some authors who use
                          the hyphenated form "code-switching". He considers
                          this usage "widespread". I don't see much of the practice
                          you mention.

                          The opposite of the practice you mention is Gratuitous
                          Head-Bashing. Or headbashing, same difference.

                          I also see that people don't agree that there are different
                          connotations in the hyphenated vs. non-hyphenated forms.
                          Alright. If it were a big issue for the 6th Generation probably
                          an important publishing house would be on top of it. In fact,
                          the issue only affects English, as far as I know. In many other
                          languages the odious hyphen is absent. So, let's talk about
                          what the phenomenon consists of, as opposed to other
                          phenomena.

                          -celso
                          Celso Alvarez Cáccamo
                          lxalvarz@...
                        • Jakob Cromdal
                          Hi Petek and all, I need to catch up on our great history -which are the 5 generations before us? /JC *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** ***
                          Message 12 of 15 , Aug 13, 2001
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                            Hi Petek and all,
                            I need to catch up on our great history -which are the 5 generations before
                            us?
                            /JC



                            *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** ***
                            Jakob Cromdal
                            Research Associate
                            Dept. of Child Studies tel: +46 13 282907
                            Linkoping University fax: +46 13 282900
                            581 83 LINKOPING email: jakcr@...
                            SWEDEN www.tema.liu.se/tema-b/
                            *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** ***
                          • Petek Kurtboke
                            Thanks Jacob, the idea of reviewing the cs literature in terms of generations was mine and if you look at my Ph.D thesis at
                            Message 13 of 15 , Aug 13, 2001
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                              Thanks Jacob, the idea of reviewing the cs literature in terms of
                              generations was mine and if you look at my Ph.D thesis at
                              http://www.vicnet.net.au/~petek/thesis/ you'll find my view of the
                              preceding five generations there.

                              As in my messages to the list, also in my thesis, my aim has been to
                              push the field forward, not to erect statues...Whether the sixth
                              generation follows the example will depend on the academic honesty of
                              those who have the privilege of supervising theses.


                              --- In code-switching@y..., Jakob Cromdal <JakCr@T...> wrote:
                              >
                              >
                              > Hi Petek and all,
                              > I need to catch up on our great history -which are the 5
                              generations before
                              > us?
                              > /JC
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** ***
                              ***
                              > Jakob Cromdal
                              > Research Associate
                              > Dept. of Child Studies tel: +46 13 282907
                              > Linkoping University fax: +46 13 282900
                              > 581 83 LINKOPING email: jakcr@t...
                              > SWEDEN www.tema.liu.se/tema-b/
                              > *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** ***
                              ***
                            • Mariano de Vierna y Carles-Tolr�
                              Mona, [mona, wrote] ... [mariano] Well, in my opinion as an area of study for wich any single word of natural language does not fit, it is coined a new word
                              Message 14 of 15 , Aug 20, 2001
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                                Mona,

                                [mona, wrote]
                                > Greetings to you all
                                >
                                > You might find my questions rather stupid... but I
                                > guess I need to know a
                                > bit about them anyway... so bear with me please...
                                >
                                > 1) Is there any difference what so ever between
                                > "codeswitching", "code switching" and "code-switching'?
                                > Different researchers seem to use a different spelling
                                > of the term so I only wondered why... or like why isn't
                                > there a unified spelling for the term?
                                >
                                > Dear Mona,
                                [mariano]
                                Well, in my opinion as an area of study for wich any single
                                word of natural language does not fit, it is coined a new word
                                joining two wors by means of a hyphen. The need for that is
                                to avoid the different logical properties that have words
                                with respect sintagmas: "code switching" and "code-switching".
                                If we speak of "codes switching" we have two directions for
                                studies prior to joining them, but even thing we might be
                                interested in all kinds of "codes" (Are we not?), we are not
                                interested in all kinds of "switching" (Are we?), but are
                                interested in cases of both at the same time code *and* switching.
                                So the hyphen is introduced "code-switching". In some sense,
                                that hyphen still shows that we are in an area of hypothetical study
                                and not in daily natural language. But for some researchers either
                                they feel it as a daily expresion that is worthy to include in daily natural
                                language, or they would like things to be that way so that they
                                make it to look as a daily natural language word (or they hate
                                hyphens :-)). I think it is better to keep the hyphen, because by other
                                ortographic trick as are capital letters both words are capitalized:
                                Code Switching, CS, what may indicate that they are just two
                                concepts put together to be treated as one concept/word.

                                With respect code-switching of wich I'm not an expert at all -as
                                you might think- I think that a strong hypothesis like that there
                                is only code-switching when the user knows/has two or more
                                codes and consciously changes from one to another is not what
                                is intended by it, although that is what it seems to suggest to me.
                                The proper hypothesis seems to me should be a weak one, were
                                the compoun word "code-switching" is not so clearly asociated with
                                the object it gives name but rather functions as a lavel for a
                                variety of observations for wich the change of code in some of them
                                might not be even its most characteristic property.

                                Yours cordially,
                                mariano
                              • Just_plain_Ben@hotmail.com
                                ... to my ... Television = TV I m not a linguist but I have interpreted for one! Ben Karlin St. Louis, MO
                                Message 15 of 15 , Oct 29, 2001
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                                  --- In code-switching@y..., Celso Alvarez Cáccamo <lxalvarz@u...>
                                  wrote:
                                  >
                                  > At any rate, I
                                  > suppose CS cannot stand for 'codeswitching',which is just one word;
                                  to my
                                  > knowledge, single words cannot have two initials ;-) .
                                  >
                                  >

                                  Television = TV

                                  I'm not a linguist but I have interpreted for one!

                                  Ben Karlin
                                  St. Louis, MO
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