Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

formal or informal cs

Expand Messages
  • imban@hotmail.com
    dear friends, in malaysia, we are basically diglossic. we have a formal form of Bahasa Melayu and an informal form of the language which is used in day-to-day
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 28, 2001
    • 0 Attachment
      dear friends,
      in malaysia, we are basically diglossic. we have a formal form of
      Bahasa Melayu and an informal form of the language which is used in
      day-to-day interaction. the other form is of course used in formal
      events and interactions. many people believe that speakers of Bahasa
      Melayu tend to cs to English when using the informal form of the
      language. i have my doubts about this because from my own personal
      experience, i find that speakers do cs in formal settings e.g.
      department meetings etc. and what is more alarming is that men tend to
      cs during formal interactions than women do, but i think i still have
      to look deeper into this matter, find more proof.


      Yuhana.
    • Petek Kurtboke
      Dear Yuhana, I looked at the writing of Turkish migrants in Australia and found that in the context of immigration the distinvtion between formal and
      Message 2 of 2 , Mar 31, 2001
      • 0 Attachment
        Dear Yuhana, I looked at the writing of Turkish migrants in Australia
        and found that in the context of immigration the distinvtion between
        'formal' and 'informal' tends to disappear. However, when I look at
        the tendency in the mainland, I also see that this is a
        generation-specific phenomenon. The generations who lived through the
        Language Reform from 1930s onwards still used Arabic, Persian and
        French in many areas of daily life and the diglossic situation
        continued, such language being very formal. Even the dictionaries had
        to record both options, ie these and Turkish. That's a thing of the
        past now and as there are always fewer members of the last generation
        that experienced the diglossic situation, the divide between the
        formal and informal is disappearing fast.

        So there are a few things for you to consider here,
        the policy of the language planners in Malaysia, the differences
        between generations, the way all this is represented in dictionaries
        and of course the issues of status, as well as gender as you suggest.
        Hope this is of use.
        With best wishes
        Petek

        --- In code-switching@y..., imban@h... wrote:
        > dear friends,
        > in malaysia, we are basically diglossic. we have a formal form
        of
        > Bahasa Melayu and an informal form of the language which is used in
        > day-to-day interaction. the other form is of course used in formal
        > events and interactions. many people believe that speakers of Bahasa
        > Melayu tend to cs to English when using the informal form of the
        > language. i have my doubts about this because from my own personal
        > experience, i find that speakers do cs in formal settings e.g.
        > department meetings etc. and what is more alarming is that men tend
        to
        > cs during formal interactions than women do, but i think i still
        have
        > to look deeper into this matter, find more proof.
        >
        >
        > Yuhana.
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.