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Re: [code-switching] Re: what code is it?

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  • kerim.list@oxus.net
    I just wanted to clarify. My point was not that structural (or corpus) analysis is not useful - but that for borderline cases it is necessarily has limitations
    Message 1 of 10 , Feb 28, 2001
      I just wanted to clarify. My point was not that structural (or corpus) analysis is not useful - but that for borderline cases it is necessarily has limitations which ultimately must make reference to the social. As in the prototype semantics of the word "lie" there are clearly some things that are lies, while some statements are controversial and different people will identify them differently. Stuctural analysis is good at identifying the linguistic factors that underly such an identification (some recent posts have listed such exaples) but identification conflicts must be resolved by appealing to norms outside of the system. (I would argue that the very process of trying to construct a closed, monolingual, view of linguistic systems - or codes - is itself a highly politically charged project with roots in early 20th century nationalist visions of language and ethnicity.)I am just questioning the project of trying to develop a stucturally closed system that can properly identify such borderline cases. I was reacting to posts on this list which implied that the failure to properly construct such a system was somehow a failing of the discipline. I would argue, to the contrary, that Celso is right to describe such questions as "uninteresting" in so far as it forces us to move beyond the impossible. I strongly agree with those who deny that even monolinguals are monolingual (a nice speech by Derrida on "The Monolingualism of the Other" makes this point). Linguistic systems are not closed, and attempts to make distinctions which presuppose their closure will necessarily run into difficulty.

      kerim

      PS: I do not understand what Peter meant by his remark about the tone of my letters - but I intend no disrespect. I enjoy making a strong argument, and I have been greatly enjoying this thread. My own work is not directly involved in the structural or even the interactional analysis of code-switching (although I am much more interested in the later), and so I am interested in seeing the different approaches that people have posed to these questions.
    • Petek Kurtboke
      ... tone of my letters - but I intend no disrespect. I enjoy making a strong argument, and I have been greatly enjoying this thread. My own work is not
      Message 2 of 10 , Mar 1, 2001
        --- In code-switching@y..., kerim.list@o... wrote:
        >
        > PS: I do not understand what Peter meant by his remark about the
        tone of my letters - but I intend no disrespect. I enjoy making a
        strong argument, and I have been greatly enjoying this thread. My own
        work is not directly involved in the structural or even the
        interactional analysis of code-switching (although I am much more
        interested in the later), and so I am interested in seeing the
        different approaches that people have posed to these questions.

        Kerim, my name happens to be Petek, 'k' final, which itself is
        an Armenian loan into Turkish, and thanks to the vowel harmony you
        can't tell! And I happen to be a she.
        I enjoy the exchanges too.
        With best wishes
        Petek
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