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Re: DO verb + bare stem verb

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  • petek kurtboke
    I ve done quite a bit of work on do/make constructions in Turkish in contact with English and other languages if that s what you re after. Also there s some
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 1, 2000
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      I've done quite a bit of work on do/make constructions in Turkish in
      contact with English and other languages if that's what you're after.
      Also there's some work in progress on Greek-English contact at the
      University of Birmingham, UK where do/make construction is part of
      it.
      Petek



      --- In code-switching@egroups.com, "Laura Callahan" <Lcallahan@a...>
      wrote:
      > Dear List members,
      > Constructions with an inflected DO verb + bare stem verb are common
      in
      > Spanish-English data sets as well as other language pairs. An
      example
      > is the ubiquitous "haz click aquí", in which the Spanish DO verb
      > "hacer" carries all necessary inflections. (The alternative
      solution,
      > adapting the English verb to Spanish morphology, is also seen:
      > "cliquea aquí".)
      > Can anyone cite examples of this construction in any language pair
      > involving English in which English supplies the inflected DO verb
      (to
      > do, to practice, to make, etc.) and the other language supplies the
      > bare stem verb?
      > Thank you in advance for any insights anyone can offer me.
      > Laura C
    • Alkisti Fleischer
      In Greek-English and Greek-German code-switching which involves the do + verb construction, do is in Greek ( kano , which needs to be conjugated), along with
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 1, 2000
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        In Greek-English and Greek-German code-switching which involves
        the do + verb construction,"do" is in Greek ("kano", which needs to be
        conjugated), along with the infinitive of the verb in English or German -
        not the other way round.
        E.g.
        -"tha kano drive" (Greek-English)

        -"tha kano fahren" (Greek-German)
        ('I will do drive') = I will drive

        Theodore Maniakas has explored this phenomenon in Greek-English contact in
        Montreal.
        See:
        Maniakas, Theodoros (1983): "Sociolinguistic features of Modern Greek as
        it is spoken in Montreal." M.A. thesis, McGill University, Department of
        Linguistics.

        Alkisti

        On Fri, 1 Dec 2000, petek kurtboke wrote:

        > I've done quite a bit of work on do/make constructions in Turkish in
        > contact with English and other languages if that's what you're after.
        > Also there's some work in progress on Greek-English contact at the
        > University of Birmingham, UK where do/make construction is part of
        > it.
        > Petek
        >
        >
        >
        > --- In code-switching@egroups.com, "Laura Callahan" <Lcallahan@a...>
        > wrote:
        > > Dear List members,
        > > Constructions with an inflected DO verb + bare stem verb are common
        > in
        > > Spanish-English data sets as well as other language pairs. An
        > example
        > > is the ubiquitous "haz click aquí", in which the Spanish DO verb
        > > "hacer" carries all necessary inflections. (The alternative
        > solution,
        > > adapting the English verb to Spanish morphology, is also seen:
        > > "cliquea aquí".)
        > > Can anyone cite examples of this construction in any language pair
        > > involving English in which English supplies the inflected DO verb
        > (to
        > > do, to practice, to make, etc.) and the other language supplies the
        > > bare stem verb?
        > > Thank you in advance for any insights anyone can offer me.
        > > Laura C
        >
        >
        >
        > To Post a message: code-switching@...
        > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: code-switching-unsubscribe@...
        > Web page: http//www.egroups.com/group/code-switching
        >
        >
      • petek kurtboke
        Alkisti, I forwarded your message to my colleagues in Birmingham and got the following message. Hope it s of use to you and other colleagues working on the
        Message 3 of 4 , Dec 5, 2000
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          Alkisti, I forwarded your message to my colleagues in Birmingham and
          got the following message. Hope it's of use to you and other
          colleagues working on the same topic.
          With best wishes
          Petek

          --- In code-switching@egroups.com, Alkisti Fleischer <fleischa@g...>
          wrote:
          > In Greek-English and Greek-German code-switching which involves
          > the do + verb construction,"do" is in Greek ("kano", which needs to
          be
          > conjugated), along with the infinitive of the verb in English or
          German -
          > not the other way round.
          > E.g.
          > -"tha kano drive" (Greek-English)
          >
          > -"tha kano fahren" (Greek-German)
          > ('I will do drive') = I will drive
          >
          > Theodore Maniakas has explored this phenomenon in Greek-English
          contact in
          > Montreal.
          > See:
          > Maniakas, Theodoros (1983): "Sociolinguistic features of Modern
          Greek as
          > it is spoken in Montreal." M.A. thesis, McGill University,
          Department of
          > Linguistics.
          >
          > Alkisti
          ----------------------------------
          Another reference is Triantafyllidis, M. (1953) ta ellinika ton
          ellinon tis amerikis [the Greek of Greek Americans], published in a
          periodical called Ellinika ["Greek"] pp 301-331, in which he notes:

          "kanei exercises" [he exercises] for "gymnazetai"
          "tha kanei deal" [he will do a deal"] for "emporevetai" [he does
          business]
          "kanei typewriting" [he does typewriting] for "he types"
          "na kamis claim to property sou" [you should do a claim for your
          property] "you should claim your property"

          Although not published until 1953, the data was gathered during a
          visit by Triandafyllidis to the USA in 1939.

          N.B. the form with -m- instead of -n- in the last example (kamis) is
          an old-fashioned and formal variant of the form with -n-.
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