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mixed-code again

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  • Silvia Dalla Torre
    First of all, greetings to everybody! I m an Italian student of foreign languages, with interest in code switching. I ve recently read something about mixed
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 30, 2000
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      First of all, greetings to everybody!
      I'm an Italian student of foreign languages, with interest in code switching.
      I've recently read something about mixed codes, mostly in Auer, "Code
      Switching in Conversation", and I find really intriguing the possibility
      that code switching could "evolve" and become a language on its own.
      However it seems to me that this theoretical position is difficult to find
      out in reality. I mean, how can we say "this is a code switched speech" and
      "this is a mixed code"? Should we use quantitative criteria (how many
      people use it, ...) ? Should we look if people can speak the two (or more)
      single languages distinctly?
      Well, I wish you all a nice day,
      Silvia
    • Jan Blommaert
      well, this is obviously the heart of the debate right now, where issues of codes are locked into issues of speech communities. As a start, I would suggest a
      Message 2 of 3 , Nov 30, 2000
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        well, this is obviously the heart of the debate right now, where issues of
        codes are locked into issues of speech communities. As a start, I would
        suggest a careful reading of some of Ben Rampton's work:

        1995: Crossing, Language and ethnicity among adolescents. London: Longman
        1998: Speech community. In J. verschueren et al (edfs.) Handbook of
        Pragmatics 1998. Amsterdam: Benjamins

        Also very useful is Michael Silverstein's 'Contemporary transformations of
        local linguistic communities' in Annual Review of Anthropology 27: 401-426,
        1998.


        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Silvia Dalla Torre" <silvia@...>
        To: <code-switching@...>
        Sent: Thursday, November 30, 2000 9:42 AM
        Subject: [code-switching] mixed-code again


        > First of all, greetings to everybody!
        > I'm an Italian student of foreign languages, with interest in code
        switching.
        > I've recently read something about mixed codes, mostly in Auer, "Code
        > Switching in Conversation", and I find really intriguing the possibility
        > that code switching could "evolve" and become a language on its own.
        > However it seems to me that this theoretical position is difficult to find
        > out in reality. I mean, how can we say "this is a code switched speech"
        and
        > "this is a mixed code"? Should we use quantitative criteria (how many
        > people use it, ...) ? Should we look if people can speak the two (or more)
        > single languages distinctly?
        > Well, I wish you all a nice day,
        > Silvia
        >
        >
        >
        > To Post a message: code-switching@...
        > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
        code-switching-unsubscribe@...
        > Web page: http//www.egroups.com/group/code-switching
        >
        >
      • Jan Blommaert
        By the way, for those interested in the connection between codes and identity, I find Don Kulick s recent paper on Gay and lesbian language in the Annual
        Message 3 of 3 , Nov 30, 2000
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          By the way, for those interested in the connection between codes and
          identity, I find Don Kulick's recent paper on 'Gay and lesbian language' in
          the Annual review of Anthropology 29 (2000) also very worthy of close
          reading. Jan Blommaert

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Jan Blommaert" <Jan.Blommaert@...>
          To: <code-switching@...>
          Sent: Thursday, November 30, 2000 9:55 AM
          Subject: Re: [code-switching] mixed-code again


          > well, this is obviously the heart of the debate right now, where issues of
          > codes are locked into issues of speech communities. As a start, I would
          > suggest a careful reading of some of Ben Rampton's work:
          >
          > 1995: Crossing, Language and ethnicity among adolescents. London: Longman
          > 1998: Speech community. In J. verschueren et al (edfs.) Handbook of
          > Pragmatics 1998. Amsterdam: Benjamins
          >
          > Also very useful is Michael Silverstein's 'Contemporary transformations of
          > local linguistic communities' in Annual Review of Anthropology 27:
          401-426,
          > 1998.
          >
          >
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: "Silvia Dalla Torre" <silvia@...>
          > To: <code-switching@...>
          > Sent: Thursday, November 30, 2000 9:42 AM
          > Subject: [code-switching] mixed-code again
          >
          >
          > > First of all, greetings to everybody!
          > > I'm an Italian student of foreign languages, with interest in code
          > switching.
          > > I've recently read something about mixed codes, mostly in Auer, "Code
          > > Switching in Conversation", and I find really intriguing the possibility
          > > that code switching could "evolve" and become a language on its own.
          > > However it seems to me that this theoretical position is difficult to
          find
          > > out in reality. I mean, how can we say "this is a code switched speech"
          > and
          > > "this is a mixed code"? Should we use quantitative criteria (how many
          > > people use it, ...) ? Should we look if people can speak the two (or
          more)
          > > single languages distinctly?
          > > Well, I wish you all a nice day,
          > > Silvia
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > To Post a message: code-switching@...
          > > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
          > code-switching-unsubscribe@...
          > > Web page: http//www.egroups.com/group/code-switching
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          > To Post a message: code-switching@...
          > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
          code-switching-unsubscribe@...
          > Web page: http//www.egroups.com/group/code-switching
          >
          >
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