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types of code sawitching

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  • fld02@scnu.edu.cn
    In a tri-generation family conversation among Chinese imigarants, the mide aged parents interpret the youngsters ENglish utterances for the old generation
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 1 2:49 AM
      In a tri-generation family conversation among Chinese imigarants, the
      mide aged parents interpret the youngsters' ENglish utterances for
      the old generation speakers(grandparents)and do the same for the old
      to the young. How to value this type of CS?
    • James L. Fidelholtz
      ... Well, I don t quite feel comfortable calling this code-switching. It is rather some sort of non-simultaneous translation (sorry, there s a term for that
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 1 10:34 AM
        On Tue, 1 Aug 2000 fld02@... wrote:

        >In a tri-generation family conversation among Chinese immigrants, the
        >mid-aged parents interpret the youngsters' ENglish utterances for
        >the old generation speakers(grandparents)and do the same for the old
        >to the young. How to value this type of CS?

        Well, I don't quite feel comfortable calling this
        code-switching. It is rather some sort of non-simultaneous translation
        (sorry, there's a term for that which just isn't coming to mind at the
        moment ?successive).
        An anecdote of an analogous situation which once happened to me
        to show why I am reticent to call this code-switching. I am from the
        Midwest (Toledo, Ohio), so virtually all speakers of English, especially
        American English, can understand me, and usually vice versa. When I was
        in college, I found myself one afternoon with an older friend from New
        Hampshire and a freshman from South Carolina, recently arrived in
        Boston. Both spoke typically for their region, and I could understand
        both, since I had lived in the South for several years, and had lived
        with my friend for a whole year. Neither one, however, could understand
        the other, since neither had had previous experience with speakers of
        the other's variety. So I simply repeated in my Midwestern English
        whatever either one said, and both could understand me with no problem.
        The conversation went along fine that way for about a half hour. I find
        this situation in all ways comparable to that of the bilingual parents
        'translating' between the respective monolingual generations, but I was
        just being my monolingual self the whole time.
        Jim

        --
        James L. Fidelholtz e-mail: jfidel@...
        Posgrado en Ciencias del Lenguaje tel.: +(52-2)229-5500 x5705
        Instituto de Ciencias Sociales y Humanidades fax: +(01-2) 229-5681
        Benemιrita Universidad Autσnoma de Puebla, MΙXICO
      • Lisa Seidlitz
        ... I have no problem labelling the entire conversation codeswitching. I would say that not every speaker engages in CS (only the middle generation in the
        Message 3 of 4 , Aug 1 2:02 PM
          >>In a tri-generation family conversation among Chinese immigrants, the
          >>mid-aged parents interpret the youngsters' ENglish utterances for
          >>the old generation speakers(grandparents)and do the same for the old
          >>to the young. How to value this type of CS?
          >
          > Well, I don't quite feel comfortable calling this
          >code-switching. It is rather some sort of non-simultaneous translation
          >(sorry, there's a term for that which just isn't coming to mind at the
          >moment ?successive).

          I have no problem labelling the entire conversation codeswitching. I would
          say that not every speaker engages in CS (only the middle generation in the
          Chinese example does actually switch) but that the conversation as a whole
          does contain CS.
          *****************
          Was it really a waterfall, or was it pushed?
          Lisa Seidlitz, M.A.
          University of Texas at Austin



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        • Harold F. Schiffman
          I don t know what to call this; maybe code-interpretation? I had an experience like this years ago while accompanying a group of German students on a study
          Message 4 of 4 , Aug 2 8:10 AM
            I don't know what to call this; maybe code-interpretation? I had an
            experience like this years ago while accompanying a group of German
            students on a study tour here. There was a Berliner who claimed to not
            understand a Swabian, who claimed to not understand the Berliner. (I
            thought then and think now they were both exaggerating, and trying to make
            a point.) Anyway, I could understand them both so it befell me to
            'translate' for both of them, which consisted of my saying in Hochdeutsch
            what either one said in his dialect-marked German. (I think they both
            exaggerated the dialectal features of their German while in the other's
            presence, too).

            What interests me now is the ATTITUDES behind the claim to not understand
            another dialectally-marked version of one's mother tongue; I could
            understand the Swabian because I'd spent a year in South Germany; the
            Berliner was doing low-German type things to his German which didn't take
            a rocket scientist to figure out (e.g. 'dat wees ik nit' for 'das weiss
            ich nicht') but Swabians are very low on the totem pole
            socio-linguistically in Germany (there are lots of jokes about 'dummer
            Schwob') so I think the Swabian was just giving it back to the Berliner in
            kind. I found it amusing at the time but now see it as another issue. Is
            there some of this in the code-translation needed between Chinese
            generations? Kids refusing to dignify their grandparents'
            dialectally-marked language?

            Hal Schiffman

            On Tue, 1 Aug 2000, Lisa Seidlitz wrote:

            > >>In a tri-generation family conversation among Chinese immigrants, the
            > >>mid-aged parents interpret the youngsters' ENglish utterances for
            > >>the old generation speakers(grandparents)and do the same for the old
            > >>to the young. How to value this type of CS?
            > >
            > > Well, I don't quite feel comfortable calling this
            > >code-switching. It is rather some sort of non-simultaneous translation
            > >(sorry, there's a term for that which just isn't coming to mind at the
            > >moment ?successive).
            >
            > I have no problem labelling the entire conversation codeswitching. I would
            > say that not every speaker engages in CS (only the middle generation in the
            > Chinese example does actually switch) but that the conversation as a whole
            > does contain CS.
            > *****************
            > Was it really a waterfall, or was it pushed?
            > Lisa Seidlitz, M.A.
            > University of Texas at Austin
            >
            >
            >
            > ________________________________________________________
            > 1stUp.com - Free the Web
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