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introduction and query

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  • Ren Powell
    Hei all, I m not a linguist and not a student and may not have much to offer this group by way of informaion. Still, I m an enthusiastic layman. I m a
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 30, 2000
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      Hei all,

      I'm not a linguist and not a student and may not have much to offer this group by way of informaion. Still, I'm an enthusiastic layman.

      I'm a translator and writer, and have recently begun using code-switching (Norwegian/English) in my poetry. I am working on a collection of poems now and have a few questions in regard to an "introduction" essay I'm writing for a journal.

      1. When a Norwegian adopts an English word but that word takes on a unique connoctation within that subculture, is that code-switching? (for example, the use of the word "sorry" by Norwegian teens always implies irony). It seems different to me than when I tell people that my children are at "barnehaugen" when I know that "kindergarten" is the proper translation. I use barnehaugen because of the emotional attachment I have to the word. Kindergartens are in America. I remember how they smelled and what toys one could expect to find on the shelves. My children go to a barnehaugen in Norway. Is there a linguistic distinction between these two kinds of code-switching?

      2. (related question:) Is there a difference between the kind of easy, natural code-switching in the Chicano culture and the kind exhibited when a Midwesterner consciously peppers his speech with foreign phrases?

      3. Has there been a study on the use of code-switching for the purpose of creating a certain rhythm in conversation and/or literature?

      4. A year ago I ran across a quote on the internet and (the internet being what it is, and my archiving skills what they are) I've lost it. It was about how code-switching is not evidence of an immature grasp of the language (in adults) but rather an indication of the speaker/writer's sensitivity to nuance. I would like to support my essay with this quote. Does anyone know of a source I can turn to?

      I realize these questions may be too rudimentary for this list--in which case, please point me to the right books, websites etc. The biblio section of the e-group info was empty.

      Sincerely,
      Ren Powell
    • joel walters
      I would like to introduce myself and thank thank Celso Alvarez Caccamo for making this initiative. Among other things, it has been extremely helpful for
      Message 2 of 6 , Aug 1, 2000
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        I would like to introduce myself and thank thank Celso Alvarez Caccamo for making
        this initiative. Among other things, it has been extremely helpful for introducing
        my new graduate students to the field.

        My current interest is in developing a model of bilingual processing which
        incorporates socio-pragmatic and psycholinguistic sources of information. My
        earlier work examined speech acts among Spanish-English bilinguals; currently I
        work on Hebrew-English.

        My query: Can someone lead me to studies of codeswitching involving speech
        analyses, in particular rate of speech, pauses, and intonation contours for CS
        utterances?

        Joel Walters
        Department of English
        Language Policy Research Center
        Bar-Ilan University
        Ramat Gan 52900
        Israel

        4/5 Rehov Hayasmin
        POB 1211
        Ma'alot-Tarshiha 21520
        Israel

        Tel +972-4-957-3706
        Fax +972-3-535-4062
      • prussell@interlinx.qc.ca
        Hi. My name is Pamela Grant. For several years I have been researching borrowing from French in Quebec English, working primarily with a written corpus. I am
        Message 3 of 6 , Sep 10, 2000
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          Hi. My name is Pamela Grant. For several years I have been
          researching borrowing from French in Quebec English, working
          primarily
          with a written corpus. I am also interested in code-switching,
          particularly in written texts. Would anyone have any references about
          code-switching in non-fiction and in fiction, in written discourse? I
          would also be interested in exchanging ideas with anyone working on
          Quebec English.
          Regards, Pam

          Pamela Grant
          Université de Sherbrooke
        • af@lang.soton.ac.uk
          Pamela You may already have seen this one, but Sherry Simon has an interesting chapter in her book on Gender and Translation about novels written by
          Message 4 of 6 , Oct 21, 2000
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            Pamela
            You may already have seen this one, but Sherry Simon has an interesting
            chapter in her book on Gender and Translation about novels written
            by translators / about translating, which use codeswitching as
            a creative device. I'm currently trying to obtain some of these,
            as they look fascinating, so don't yet have first hand acquaintance
            with them
            Jane

            --- Original Message ---
            prussell@... Wrote on
            Sun, 10 Sep 2000 16:00:46 -0000
            ------------------

            Hi. My name is Pamela Grant. For several years I have been
            researching borrowing from French in Quebec English, working
            primarily=20
            with a written corpus. I am also interested in code-switching,=20
            particularly in written texts. Would anyone have any references
            about=20
            code-switching in non-fiction and in fiction, in written discourse?
            I=20
            would also be interested in exchanging ideas with anyone working
            on=20
            Quebec English.
            Regards, Pam

            Pamela Grant
            Universit=E9 de Sherbrooke


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          • makang@hkucc.hku.hk
            Dear members of the code-switching forum, I am a new member of this forum, and like so many others, am very glad this forum exists for scholars working in the
            Message 5 of 6 , Oct 24, 2000
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              Dear members of the code-switching forum,

              I am a new member of this forum, and like so many others, am very
              glad
              this forum exists for scholars working in the area of code-switching.
              I teach at the University of Hong Kong, and I completed my degree at
              the University of California, Santa Barbara.

              My interests in code-switching are in the application of discourse
              analysis and conversation analysis to bilingual interaction. My
              dissertation analyzed interactions between Korean American bilingual
              speakers, focusing on how Korean cultural ideologies were displayed
              in
              predominantly English interactions.

              My query comes from my dissertation research. I am wondering how and
              if one still makes a distinction between language alternation and
              transfer, as described by Auer 1984. I found the distinction
              interesting yet problematic in application and wondered how others
              used (if at all) the notion of transfer. Thank you in advance for
              your
              replies.

              Best,

              M. Agnes Kang

              Assistant Professor
              Department of English
              University of Hong Kong
              Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong

              Tel. (852) 2859 27545
              Fax. (852) 2559 7139
            • superhazz
              Hi Agnes Nice to have found your info I and a team of people are investigating code switching across differing socio economic classes in South Korea. We are
              Message 6 of 6 , Apr 25 5:40 PM
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                Hi Agnes
                Nice to have found your info

                I and a team of people are investigating code switching across differing socio economic classes in South Korea. We are working with 2 dimensions, 1 being the various socioeconomic classes, and the other being that of Identity recall

                I would love to see some of your work and any advice you may want to offer

                Michael

                --- In code-switching@yahoogroups.com, makang@... wrote:
                >
                > Dear members of the code-switching forum,
                >
                > I am a new member of this forum, and like so many others, am very
                > glad
                > this forum exists for scholars working in the area of code-switching.
                > I teach at the University of Hong Kong, and I completed my degree at
                > the University of California, Santa Barbara.
                >
                > My interests in code-switching are in the application of discourse
                > analysis and conversation analysis to bilingual interaction. My
                > dissertation analyzed interactions between Korean American bilingual
                > speakers, focusing on how Korean cultural ideologies were displayed
                > in
                > predominantly English interactions.
                >
                > My query comes from my dissertation research. I am wondering how and
                > if one still makes a distinction between language alternation and
                > transfer, as described by Auer 1984. I found the distinction
                > interesting yet problematic in application and wondered how others
                > used (if at all) the notion of transfer. Thank you in advance for
                > your
                > replies.
                >
                > Best,
                >
                > M. Agnes Kang
                >
                > Assistant Professor
                > Department of English
                > University of Hong Kong
                > Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong
                >
                > Tel. (852) 2859 27545
                > Fax. (852) 2559 7139
                >
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