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Re: [code-switching] Re: Code switching and borrowing... again

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  • Patricia Torres
    Thanks, Jim! The debate is becoming heated, as students find new concepts related to the topic (Leoni, thanks for metrolingualism !). They though the project
    Message 1 of 11 , Jun 15, 2011
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      Thanks, Jim!

      The debate is becoming heated, as students find new concepts related to the
      topic (Leoni, thanks for "metrolingualism"!). They though the project would
      be easy! Somehow, like sorting cards...

      Patricia



      On Tue, Jun 14, 2011 at 11:44 PM, Jim Fidelholtz <fidelholtz@...>wrote:

      > Hi, Patricia,
      >
      > Well, I think (in Spanish) that 'Chicago' (especially when pronounced
      > [tshikaGo] a la espaƱol) IS a borrowing (from English). Interestingly, in
      > English, it is pronounced [sh@kago], which (except for a nasal [a]) is
      > virtually identical to the Miami pronunciation of the word meaning roughly
      > 'skunk place' (other Algonquianists derive it from 'skunk cabbage' or other
      > stuff; don't believe it!). Btw, the word 'skunk' is also derived from the
      > same Algonquian root. In English, Chicago is almost never pronounced with
      > [tsh] (a daughter of mine goes to school there--I'll ask her to be sure,
      > but
      > none of *my* buddies pronounce it that way). It's a bit more problematic to
      > characterize the 'English' pronunciation of Chicago in the middle of a
      > sentence otherwise in Spanish (as a code switch or as a borrowing) in the
      > speech of a full bilingual. I can see reasons in some circumstances for
      > going either way, depending on the cognitive state of the speaker.
      >
      > Jim
      >


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