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Yet again once more still another pleonastic comment on 'borrowing' vs. 'code-switching'

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  • James L. Fidelholtz
    Hi, all, Today in the weekly comment edition of the Wordsmith (A.Word.a.day) list appeared the following example from Charles Neame (c.neame AT
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 20, 2009
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      Hi, all,

      Today in the weekly comment edition of the Wordsmith (A.Word.a.day) list
      appeared the following example from Charles Neame (c.neame AT
      cranfield.ac.uk):
      <<Subject: French terms used in English
      I remember once hearing an announcement on the Dover-Calais ferry. First in
      English: "Please note that the buffet is now open." Then in French:
      "Veuillez noter que le snack-bar est maintenant ouvert.">>

      Just to beat a (hopefully) dead, or at least moribund, horse, these examples
      clearly show that such speakers are *not* using code-switching, since the
      borrowings in question (most clearly in French) have *changed meaning* after
      being borrowed: 'snack bar' in English is very much *not* the same as
      'snack-bar' in French. This lexicosemantic argument nicely complements the
      phonological/phonetic ones mentioned in previous posts to this list.

      Jim

      --
      James L. Fidelholtz
      Posgrado en Ciencias del Lenguaje
      Instituto de Ciencias Sociales y Humanidades
      Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, MÉXICO


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