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Re: [code-switching] LITERARY CODE-SWITCHING!

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  • Dennis Nocomora
    Hello Sara. My thesis in college was about code switching in homilies. There is of course a distinction between a spoken and written medium. However, code
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 28 4:45 PM
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      Hello Sara.

      My thesis in college was about code switching in homilies.

      There is of course a distinction between a spoken and written medium. However, code switching in written and spoken texts may have similarities in purpose (or may be called function). Try to see Jakobson's communication model.

      As regards literary code switching, it may be relegated to a language's natural phenomenon (that is, bilingualism in general)--more of the contextual background of the literary piece. For example, speakers from the Philippines are mostly bilingual, i.e., they speak Filipino and English, and code switch all the time (see different types of bilingualism). It is also, perhaps, because of communicative competence (see Dell Hymes). As I see it, literary code switching is based on that "competence"--put it simply, if the writer deems it better to express himself in two or more languages, then s/he is likely to codeswitch. In literary terms, it may be called foregrounding--a sort of distortion of language.

      I hope this helps. Keep up that spirit.

      P.S. try also surfing the internet for LITERARY CODE SWITCHING (please cite properly)

      Sara Adams! <tijuanasmellsgood@...> wrote:
      Greetings!

      I'm a college student with linguistic/literary interests, and
      combining them in a project this semester about literary Code-
      Switching. By this I mean, when an author of a novel, short story, or
      any sort of literature switches languages. It's usually short and
      used in a quote or dialogue, but can take a variety of forms.

      I'm not exactly sure how to comment on or look at this phenomenon in
      an academic way, and my first step has been just to survey people on
      their thoughts on literary Code-Switching; how they react when they
      see it, and what it changes about a literary work depending on
      whether or not the reader can understand it. I've also been seeking
      writers to tell me why they have code-switched in their writing, and
      what effects they wanted it to have and think it has actually had.

      I would absolutely love any input on this subject, comments,
      references to books or other resources, etc.

      Thanks so much!!
      SA





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