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Re:Hear one, respond in other, happily converse

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  • Ian Wilson
    Sorry for responding so late to this thread. I don t check the list very often but just noticed the question now. I believe the term for this phenomenon is
    Message 1 of 14 , Feb 25, 2007
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      Sorry for responding so late to this thread. I don't check the list
      very often but just noticed the question now. I believe the term for
      this phenomenon is "dilingual discourse". Carolyn Johnson and I used
      the term in our 2002 IJB paper ("Phonetic evidence for early language
      differentiation: Research issues and some preliminary data".
      International Journal of Bilingualism 6: 271-289). At that time, we
      didn't know the term had been used before by Saville-Troike in her
      1987 Linguistics paper ("Dilingual discourse: The negotiation of
      meaning without a common code". Linguistics 25: 81-106).

      Note, however, that the term "dilingual" is not very common. A Google
      search on the word yields only about 100 websites that contain it.
      Compare that to the word "bilingual", which yields 26,000,000 websites!

      Sincerely,
      Ian Wilson
      University of Aizu
      <http://www.u-aizu.ac.jp/~wilson>
    • Marian Sloboda
      The different prefixation of di-lingual reminded me that, in the Czechoslovak (later on Czech and Slovak) linguistics, there has been a special term used
      Message 2 of 14 , Feb 26, 2007
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        The different prefixation of "di-lingual" reminded me that, in the
        Czechoslovak (later on Czech and Slovak) linguistics, there has been a
        special term used since the 1970s(?) for the type of bilingual
        communication in which everyone uses their own respective language and yet
        understand each other (it referred usually to communication between Czechs
        and Slovaks in the Czechoslovak context). The term is "dvojjazykovost", in
        contrast to "dvojjazycnost" (bilingualism). That is, different suffix is
        used. The Slovak linguist Juraj Dolnik uses in correspondence to this the
        German word "Bilingualismus" (in contrast to "Bilinguismus") in his 'Der
        slowakisch-tschechische Bilingualismus' (in Stefanik, J. (ed.)
        Bilingvizmus: minulost, pritomnost a buducnost. Bratislava: Academic
        Electronic Press, 2002).
        Best regards,
        Marian Sloboda


        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Ian Wilson" <wilson@...>
        To: <code-switching@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Monday, February 26, 2007 3:10 AM
        Subject: [code-switching] Re:Hear one, respond in other, happily converse


        > Sorry for responding so late to this thread. I don't check the list
        > very often but just noticed the question now. I believe the term for
        > this phenomenon is "dilingual discourse". Carolyn Johnson and I used
        > the term in our 2002 IJB paper ("Phonetic evidence for early language
        > differentiation: Research issues and some preliminary data".
        > International Journal of Bilingualism 6: 271-289). At that time, we
        > didn't know the term had been used before by Saville-Troike in her
        > 1987 Linguistics paper ("Dilingual discourse: The negotiation of
        > meaning without a common code". Linguistics 25: 81-106).
        >
        > Note, however, that the term "dilingual" is not very common. A Google
        > search on the word yields only about 100 websites that contain it.
        > Compare that to the word "bilingual", which yields 26,000,000 websites!
        >
        > Sincerely,
        > Ian Wilson
        > University of Aizu
        > <http://www.u-aizu.ac.jp/~wilson>
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > To Post a message: code-switching @ yahoogroups.com
        > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
        > code-switching-unsubscribe @ yahoogroups.com
        > Web page: http//groups.yahoo.com/group/code-switching
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
      • Harold F. Schiffman
        If this is the preferred term, where did I get mutual passive bilingualism? It s true that if I google this term, some of my own web pages come up near the
        Message 3 of 14 , Feb 26, 2007
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          If this is the preferred term, where did I get "mutual passive
          bilingualism?" It's true that if I google this term, some of my own web
          pages come up near the top, but there are other, older ones that seem to
          have used it earlier. Is the term passe?

          Hal Schiffman


          On Mon, 26 Feb 2007, Ian Wilson wrote:

          > Sorry for responding so late to this thread. I don't check the list
          > very often but just noticed the question now. I believe the term for
          > this phenomenon is "dilingual discourse". Carolyn Johnson and I used
          > the term in our 2002 IJB paper ("Phonetic evidence for early language
          > differentiation: Research issues and some preliminary data".
          > International Journal of Bilingualism 6: 271-289). At that time, we
          > didn't know the term had been used before by Saville-Troike in her
          > 1987 Linguistics paper ("Dilingual discourse: The negotiation of
          > meaning without a common code". Linguistics 25: 81-106).
          >
          > Note, however, that the term "dilingual" is not very common. A Google
          > search on the word yields only about 100 websites that contain it.
          > Compare that to the word "bilingual", which yields 26,000,000 websites!
          >
          > Sincerely,
          > Ian Wilson
          > University of Aizu
          > <http://www.u-aizu.ac.jp/~wilson>
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > To Post a message: code-switching @ yahoogroups.com
          > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
          > code-switching-unsubscribe @ yahoogroups.com
          > Web page: http//groups.yahoo.com/group/code-switching
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • ianlwilson
          According to Baetens Beardsmore (1986) Bilingualism: Basic principles (2nd edition) , the term receptive bilingualism is preferred over passive
          Message 4 of 14 , Feb 27, 2007
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            According to Baetens Beardsmore (1986) "Bilingualism: Basic principles (2nd edition)", the
            term "receptive bilingualism" is preferred over "passive bilingualism". The latter term "is
            not favoured by specialists involved in language learning because it is felt that any
            language decoding activity implies active neurological processes" (p.16). At any rate, these
            terms (including "mutual passive bilingualism") seem to describe a person's/people's
            bilingual ability, not the type of discourse that results.

            --- In code-switching@yahoogroups.com, "Harold F. Schiffman" <haroldfs@...> wrote:
            >
            > If this is the preferred term, where did I get "mutual passive
            > bilingualism?" It's true that if I google this term, some of my own web
            > pages come up near the top, but there are other, older ones that seem to
            > have used it earlier. Is the term passe?
            >
            > Hal Schiffman
            >
            >
            > On Mon, 26 Feb 2007, Ian Wilson wrote:
            >
            > > Sorry for responding so late to this thread. I don't check the list
            > > very often but just noticed the question now. I believe the term for
            > > this phenomenon is "dilingual discourse". Carolyn Johnson and I used
            > > the term in our 2002 IJB paper ("Phonetic evidence for early language
            > > differentiation: Research issues and some preliminary data".
            > > International Journal of Bilingualism 6: 271-289). At that time, we
            > > didn't know the term had been used before by Saville-Troike in her
            > > 1987 Linguistics paper ("Dilingual discourse: The negotiation of
            > > meaning without a common code". Linguistics 25: 81-106).
            > >
            > > Note, however, that the term "dilingual" is not very common. A Google
            > > search on the word yields only about 100 websites that contain it.
            > > Compare that to the word "bilingual", which yields 26,000,000 websites!
            > >
            > > Sincerely,
            > > Ian Wilson
            > > University of Aizu
            > > <http://www.u-aizu.ac.jp/~wilson>
          • Harold F. Schiffman
            If receptive bilingualism is preferred over passive bilingualism it extends the notion of bilingualism from that of highly-developed active skills in a
            Message 5 of 14 , Feb 28, 2007
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              If "receptive bilingualism" is preferred over "passive bilingualism" it
              extends the notion of bilingualism from that of highly-developed active
              skills in a language to minimal or non-existent active skill or
              proficiency, IMHO. I have had students in my classes who claim to
              understand everything said to them by their parents speaking Yoruba,
              Cantonese, or whatever, but claim to have no active ability in the
              language whatsoever. I agree that passive cognition of another language is
              not nothing, and I assume that if/when these students were to actively
              study their parents' mother tongues, they'd rely on this passive cognition
              and be able to learn active skills more readily and rapidly than rank
              beginners.

              So if it's specialists in language learning who are unhappy with "passive
              bilingualism", why do they get to call the shots? There are other issues,
              such as (as you mention) the type of discourse that results.

              HS


              On Wed, 28 Feb 2007, ianlwilson wrote:

              > According to Baetens Beardsmore (1986) "Bilingualism: Basic principles
              > (2nd edition)", the term "receptive bilingualism" is preferred over
              > "passive bilingualism". The latter term "is not favoured by specialists
              > involved in language learning because it is felt that any language
              > decoding activity implies active neurological processes" (p.16). At any
              > rate, these terms (including "mutual passive bilingualism") seem to
              > describe a person's/people's bilingual ability, not the type of
              > discourse that results.
              >
              > --- In code-switching@yahoogroups.com, "Harold F. Schiffman" <haroldfs@...> wrote:
              > >
              > > If this is the preferred term, where did I get "mutual passive
              > > bilingualism?" It's true that if I google this term, some of my own web
              > > pages come up near the top, but there are other, older ones that seem to
              > > have used it earlier. Is the term passe?
              > >
              > > Hal Schiffman
              > >
              > >
              > > On Mon, 26 Feb 2007, Ian Wilson wrote:
              > >
              > > > Sorry for responding so late to this thread. I don't check the list
              > > > very often but just noticed the question now. I believe the term for
              > > > this phenomenon is "dilingual discourse". Carolyn Johnson and I used
              > > > the term in our 2002 IJB paper ("Phonetic evidence for early language
              > > > differentiation: Research issues and some preliminary data".
              > > > International Journal of Bilingualism 6: 271-289). At that time, we
              > > > didn't know the term had been used before by Saville-Troike in her
              > > > 1987 Linguistics paper ("Dilingual discourse: The negotiation of
              > > > meaning without a common code". Linguistics 25: 81-106).
              > > >
              > > > Note, however, that the term "dilingual" is not very common. A Google
              > > > search on the word yields only about 100 websites that contain it.
              > > > Compare that to the word "bilingual", which yields 26,000,000 websites!
              > > >
              > > > Sincerely,
              > > > Ian Wilson
              > > > University of Aizu
              > > > <http://www.u-aizu.ac.jp/~wilson>
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > To Post a message: code-switching @ yahoogroups.com
              > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
              > code-switching-unsubscribe @ yahoogroups.com
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              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
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