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Re: [CMMi Process Improvement] regarding process deployment

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  • Aiswarya Bhaduri
    Dear Group members, Warm thanks for all of your inputs. as i read your replies, i should give a brief back ground of our org. so here it is.. we are a switch
    Message 1 of 9 , Oct 31, 2007
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      Dear Group members,

      Warm thanks for all of your inputs. as i read your replies, i should
      give a brief back ground of our org. so here it is..
      we are a switch gear(Mechanical) company (it is not a core IT
      industry) and management decided to go for CMMi L3 as i said in my
      earlier mail. So for that ,a QA group is formed here.And we have
      started defining process here i am taking care for CM PA. I am now
      ready with my process.. and demonstarte to couple of practitioner..
      but it was a short discussion so that much of input i have not
      received..Obviously as experts suggested, i agree that i have to make
      a deployment plan.. and as per that i have to train, coach and deploy
      the process .But i am a fresher, and i have defined the process as per
      my basic knowledge and by taking some inputs from the practioners.As i
      mentioned i am new so i am new to the people management skill also..
      and beacause in Electromechanical fiield it is totally a new concept
      not like Software industry so it is a very challenging job for me.. so
      pls regarding how to start and proceed and then finish.. pls share
      your input and experience.. i'll use as a guide and best pracices for
      process deployment.

      Looking forward to your valuable inputs

      Best regards,
      Aiswarya



      On Oct 31, 2007 4:16 PM, Patrick OToole <PACT.otoole@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Aiswarya,
      >
      > In addition to the very sound advice provided by Andre, you should give
      > STRONG consideration to subjecting the various process elements that you
      > have developed to a peer review. Get the potential process executors to
      > critically review your work, examining it carefully for "defects."
      >
      > If your organization does not currently do peer reviews on a regular basis
      > (or even if they do), you can exhibit appropriate "author behavior" in the
      > review. That is, you do NOT become defensive; rather, you foster an open
      > and honest review discussion that helps evolve the recently developed
      > process elements into a higher quality set. And, in doing so, you'll ALSO
      > be evolving this stuff from "your process" to "our process."
      >
      > In that regard, be VERY open to changing the material - incorporating even
      > the most insignificant cosmetic changes. Your objective is to get as many
      > "fingerprints" on the process elements as possible - the more people believe
      > they have influenced the output, the more likely they are to buy into its
      > use.
      >
      > In the future, I (and I believe that I speak for Andre as well) would
      > strongly advise against solo authorship. At a minimum, get some of the
      > current process executors to be the "content providers." You may wind up
      > doing the majority of the keyboard work, but get THEM to indicate what the
      > current good practices are, and how the process should be performed.
      > Remember that you don't need it to be PERFECT the first time - but you DO
      > need it to be USED. You'll enhance the probability of it being used if the
      > people who are going to use it help develop it (or, in the both the future
      > AND current cases, influence its outcome through active participation in the
      > review process).
      >
      > Hope this helps,
      >
      > Pat
      >
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: Andre Heijstek
      > To: cmmi_process_improvement@yahoogroups.com
      >
      > Sent: Wednesday, October 31, 2007 3:38 AM
      > Subject: Re: [CMMi Process Improvement] regarding process deployment
      >
      >
      >
      > Hello Aiswarya,
      >
      > I don't know anything about your organization, so advice will always be of
      > general nature and thus limited value, but a small attempt.
      >
      > First of all, having defined the process quite alone puts you in a rather
      > bad position to start with. Deployment is greatly supported when the process
      > users have had a chance to write the processes themselves, or at least have
      > been involved to some extent.
      > Given that state, I suggest to pick a few pilot projects, where you
      > implement some processes each. E.g. estimating in project 1, CM in project
      > 2, etc. Learn from the pilot results and then go for broader deployment. If
      > the pilots show great difficulty, go back to the drawing board - now
      > involving the people from the pilot project - revise your process
      > description and pilot again.
      > If the pilots run well, you can directly go more broadly.
      >
      > Deploying onto pilot projects or all projects involves a lot of training,
      > coaching and support.
      >
      > Hope this helps,
      >
      > André Heijstek
      > andre.heijstek@...
      > www.improvementfocus.com
      > Mobile: +31 648 476 451
      > Marga Klompéstraat 23
      > 2805 CZ Gouda
      > The Netherlands
      >
      >
      > On 30-okt-2007, at 6:19, Aiswarya Bhaduri wrote:
      >
      >
      >
      > Dear All,
      > Can you provide me guidance on how we can effectively deploy the defined
      > process. Do you have any road map regarding this? if you have any kindly
      > provide me guidance on the same.We are going for L3 staged assessment, i am
      > very much new in this field.. and we have completed the process definition
      > recently. But i think unless until it is deployed effectively among the
      > practitioner it will have no use. And i have defined the process quite
      > alone. So please guide me on this .
      >
      > --
      > With Best Regards,
      > Aiswarya Bhaduri
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >



      --
      With Best Regards,
      Aiswarya Bhaduri
    • Bruce Epstein
      Hello Aiswarya, I have successfully implemented CMMI practices in several multi- discipinary product environments, including HW/SW/Mech and HW/SW, as well as
      Message 2 of 9 , Nov 5, 2007
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        Hello Aiswarya,

        I have successfully implemented CMMI practices in several multi-
        discipinary product environments, including HW/SW/Mech and HW/SW, as
        well as SW-only.

        It is obvious that the details of the *implementation* might vary
        depending on the discipine and the type of product, but even then
        only in a few SPs, notably (but not exclusively) in TS.

        However, as far as *deployment* goes, I have never noticed any
        significant difference between the disciplines. After all, in all
        cases we're dealing with highly skilled knowledge workers. So all of
        the best practices of deployment are still relevant, including
        planning, piloting, coaching, training, facilitating, supporting,
        etc. Personally, I have never seen a successful "throw it over the
        wall" process deployment approach, nor would I ever advocate it.

        On the other hand, and no offense intended toward you, but the
        successful deployments that I have witnessed usually placed one of
        the *most experienced* project managers in charge, not a novice. Or
        if they absolutely had to place a novice in charge, they always
        ensured that s/he had substantial support from an expert.

        Hope this helps,
        Bruce Epstein
        CMMI Instructor
        Paris, France

        --- In cmmi_process_improvement@yahoogroups.com, "Aiswarya Bhaduri"
        <riya425@...> wrote:
        >
        > Dear Group members,
        >
        > Warm thanks for all of your inputs. as i read your replies, i should
        > give a brief back ground of our org. so here it is..
        > we are a switch gear(Mechanical) company (it is not a core IT
        > industry) and management decided to go for CMMi L3 as i said in my
        > earlier mail. So for that ,a QA group is formed here.And we have
        > started defining process here i am taking care for CM PA. I am now
        > ready with my process.. and demonstarte to couple of practitioner..
        > but it was a short discussion so that much of input i have not
        > received..Obviously as experts suggested, i agree that i have to
        make
        > a deployment plan.. and as per that i have to train, coach and
        deploy
        > the process .But i am a fresher, and i have defined the process as
        per
        > my basic knowledge and by taking some inputs from the
        practioners.As i
        > mentioned i am new so i am new to the people management skill
        also..
        > and beacause in Electromechanical fiield it is totally a new concept
        > not like Software industry so it is a very challenging job for me..
        so
        > pls regarding how to start and proceed and then finish.. pls share
        > your input and experience.. i'll use as a guide and best pracices
        for
        > process deployment.
        >
        > Looking forward to your valuable inputs
        >
        > Best regards,
        > Aiswarya
        >
        >
        >
        > On Oct 31, 2007 4:16 PM, Patrick OToole <PACT.otoole@...> wrote:
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Aiswarya,
        > >
        > > In addition to the very sound advice provided by Andre, you
        should give
        > > STRONG consideration to subjecting the various process elements
        that you
        > > have developed to a peer review. Get the potential process
        executors to
        > > critically review your work, examining it carefully for "defects."
        > >
        > > If your organization does not currently do peer reviews on a
        regular basis
        > > (or even if they do), you can exhibit appropriate "author
        behavior" in the
        > > review. That is, you do NOT become defensive; rather, you foster
        an open
        > > and honest review discussion that helps evolve the recently
        developed
        > > process elements into a higher quality set. And, in doing so,
        you'll ALSO
        > > be evolving this stuff from "your process" to "our process."
        > >
        > > In that regard, be VERY open to changing the material -
        incorporating even
        > > the most insignificant cosmetic changes. Your objective is to
        get as many
        > > "fingerprints" on the process elements as possible - the more
        people believe
        > > they have influenced the output, the more likely they are to buy
        into its
        > > use.
        > >
        > > In the future, I (and I believe that I speak for Andre as well)
        would
        > > strongly advise against solo authorship. At a minimum, get some
        of the
        > > current process executors to be the "content providers." You may
        wind up
        > > doing the majority of the keyboard work, but get THEM to indicate
        what the
        > > current good practices are, and how the process should be
        performed.
        > > Remember that you don't need it to be PERFECT the first time -
        but you DO
        > > need it to be USED. You'll enhance the probability of it being
        used if the
        > > people who are going to use it help develop it (or, in the both
        the future
        > > AND current cases, influence its outcome through active
        participation in the
        > > review process).
        > >
        > > Hope this helps,
        > >
        > > Pat
        > >
        > >
        > > ----- Original Message -----
        > > From: Andre Heijstek
        > > To: cmmi_process_improvement@yahoogroups.com
        > >
        > > Sent: Wednesday, October 31, 2007 3:38 AM
        > > Subject: Re: [CMMi Process Improvement] regarding process
        deployment
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Hello Aiswarya,
        > >
        > > I don't know anything about your organization, so advice will
        always be of
        > > general nature and thus limited value, but a small attempt.
        > >
        > > First of all, having defined the process quite alone puts you in
        a rather
        > > bad position to start with. Deployment is greatly supported when
        the process
        > > users have had a chance to write the processes themselves, or at
        least have
        > > been involved to some extent.
        > > Given that state, I suggest to pick a few pilot projects, where
        you
        > > implement some processes each. E.g. estimating in project 1, CM
        in project
        > > 2, etc. Learn from the pilot results and then go for broader
        deployment. If
        > > the pilots show great difficulty, go back to the drawing board -
        now
        > > involving the people from the pilot project - revise your process
        > > description and pilot again.
        > > If the pilots run well, you can directly go more broadly.
        > >
        > > Deploying onto pilot projects or all projects involves a lot of
        training,
        > > coaching and support.
        > >
        > > Hope this helps,
        > >
        > > André Heijstek
        > > andre.heijstek@...
        > > www.improvementfocus.com
        > > Mobile: +31 648 476 451
        > > Marga Klompéstraat 23
        > > 2805 CZ Gouda
        > > The Netherlands
        > >
        > >
        > > On 30-okt-2007, at 6:19, Aiswarya Bhaduri wrote:
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Dear All,
        > > Can you provide me guidance on how we can effectively deploy the
        defined
        > > process. Do you have any road map regarding this? if you have any
        kindly
        > > provide me guidance on the same.We are going for L3 staged
        assessment, i am
        > > very much new in this field.. and we have completed the process
        definition
        > > recently. But i think unless until it is deployed effectively
        among the
        > > practitioner it will have no use. And i have defined the process
        quite
        > > alone. So please guide me on this .
        > >
        > > --
        > > With Best Regards,
        > > Aiswarya Bhaduri
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        > --
        > With Best Regards,
        > Aiswarya Bhaduri
        >
      • Hillel Glazer
        Greetings Aiswarya, Bruce is spot-on in every respect. I m especially pleased he broke the ice about putting inexperienced people in the position I m sorry
        Message 3 of 9 , Nov 5, 2007
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          Greetings Aiswarya,

          Bruce is spot-on in every respect.  I'm especially pleased he "broke the ice" about putting inexperienced people in the position I'm sorry to read you find yourself in.  I would add a few more thoughts to his.  Your post (before I read Bruce's reply) nearly had me writing a new topic on personal rant.  It's the idea that organizations insist on implementing CMMI themselves without any experience or expertise whatsoever.

          I'm not saying every organization must hire a consultant.  Far from it.  I'm saying that without proper experience and/or expertise in CMMI *AND* in combination with the domain where it's being implemented, the efforts can result in lost time, lost opportunity, and worse, wasted effort in the wrong direction.  In other words, wrong learning.  In truth, too many consultants are no better (witness Dawn's discussion about High Maturity "ML4 & 5 - how much percentage is right - if not 100%?" -- enough said).

          What you need is to truly integrate the process improvement practices into the work that you're already doing.  This requires that your current practices be well-understood, not just CMMI practices.  If you have no practices, and your organization truly operates in a state of chaos, you will be well-served to stabilize towards some recognizable, appropriate and sufficient level of process and procedural consistency.  The CMMI practices do not provide sufficient detail to hand you a process (let alone procedures) that are appropriate to your business -- this is true whether you develop software or not (like you). 

          The most efficient and effective processes and procedures will result when the process stakeholders (people who understand the processes, use the processes, care about process performance and understand process improvement in the context of the processes) get together and *design* process "solutions" together.  All process and procedure needs, constraints, boundary conditions and requirements are put on the table and an agreed-upon solution is developed.  A lot like hardware or software.  This is hard work and requires several levels of expertise.  But it does result in the most lasting, well-acculturated improved processes.

          There are two ways to look at your situation.  One is from the CMMI side, as you and most people already have in this discussion.  From this side, we see that you and your organization are not experts in CMMI.  (Taking Introduction to CMMI does not make anyone an expert.)  And, we see that your organization is struggling.  No surprise.  Being frank, it's rare that organizations focusing on CMMI, but without expertise in CMMI can "get it right" on their own. 

          Then we can look at your situation from the other side.  From the perspective of what your organization does.  To give you an example of how important it is to not only look at it from the CMMI side, one of the companies I'm working with has SEVERAL organizational units at ML5 and several others steadily moving in that direction.  They have at least two SCAMPI B&C team leaders as employees.  The person in charge of the CMMI implementation effort is one of them.  These people *get* CMMI.  However, all their CMMI experience is in software.

          When the organization's vice president for operations saw the value and benefit CMMI was having on software operations he asked that they launch an effort on their manufacturing activities.  To date, no one in this company with CMMI experience (not even their external high maturity lead appraiser) has any domain expertise in manufacturing.  They don't feel qualified to adapt CMMI into their manufacturing situation.  Although that's where I come in, it's not the point of the story.  Having implemented process improvement in manufacturing as well as CMMI in non-software production, they feel it would be in their best interest and long-term success to have the right set of experience and skills to help extend their improvement practices into manufacturing -- even though they themselves are quite expert at CMMI.

          I hope this gives you some ideas you can talk about with your company.  Good luck!
          -->>  Hillel

          On Nov 5, 2007 4:14 AM, Bruce Epstein <bepstein@...> wrote:
          > Hello Aiswarya,
          >
          > I have successfully implemented CMMI practices in several multi-
          > discipinary product environments, including HW/SW/Mech and HW/SW, as
          > well as SW-only.
          >
          > It is obvious that the details of the *implementation* might vary
          > depending on the discipine and the type of product, but even then
          > only in a few SPs, notably (but not exclusively) in TS.
          >
          > However, as far as *deployment* goes, I have never noticed any
          > significant difference between the disciplines. After all, in all
          > cases we're dealing with highly skilled knowledge workers. So all of
          > the best practices of deployment are still relevant, including
          > planning, piloting, coaching, training, facilitating, supporting,
          > etc. Personally, I have never seen a successful "throw it over the
          > wall" process deployment approach, nor would I ever advocate it.
          >
          > On the other hand, and no offense intended toward you, but the
          > successful deployments that I have witnessed usually placed one of
          > the *most experienced* project managers in charge, not a novice. Or
          > if they absolutely had to place a novice in charge, they always
          > ensured that s/he had substantial support from an expert.
          >
          > Hope this helps,
          > Bruce Epstein
          > CMMI Instructor
          > Paris, France
          >



          --
          --
          Visit http://www.agilecmmi.com
        • Haluk Tekbulut
          Hi all, Is any body aware of the publicly availability of PIIDs (probably for small settings project) for CMMI version 1.2? Check
          Message 4 of 9 , Nov 5, 2007
          • 0 Attachment
            Hi all,
             
            Is any body aware of the publicly availability of PIIDs (probably for small settings project) for CMMI version 1.2?
             
             
            Thanks,
            Haluk
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