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Re: [clubpuck] rookies

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  • Julie Jensen
    Since I went to an all-girls school for junior high and part of high school, I don t have a 12-year-old male comparison history. I played UWH for about six
    Message 1 of 7 , Mar 9, 2007
      Since I went to an all-girls school for junior high and part of high school, I don't have a 12-year-old male comparison history.  I played UWH for about six months a couple of years ago and was commenting from a "rookie" perspective rather than that of an adolescent.  It seems like Club Puck and others have been struggling with the rookie issue lately and I thought the additional perspective might be appreciated.  Besides, comparing 12-year-old boys to 12-year-old girls is nothing like comparing 12-year-old boys with adults of either gender, which is what is happening with Todd.
       
      Thowing a kid or a rookie or both in with highly competitive, physical adults with varying amounts of self-awareness is not the best way to learn.  It seems like that at least has been recognized and is being worked on (kudos!).  The next question is, how long do you keep the kids/rookies to the rookie game?  When do you decide they can be thrown in to the colors?  And how long do you handle them gently for once they get there?  At some point the kids/rookies need to be out of the way so that people can practice their own game without worrying about them, too.
       
      While I may not have competed as a 12-year-old with boys, I have participated in a variety of sports with consistently different levels of practice (and competition) so that less experienced players can learn new skills without getting hurt and more competitive players can still improve their skills and enjoy a quicker, harder game.  No, the two aren't necessarily independent of each other, but there needs to be time for separate play and together play when there's such a variety of skill levels.
       
      Just my two cents...
       
      Julie

      CROSEUSOA@... wrote:
      Please remember 12 year olds are children not teens particularly boys. Girls mature much faster physically and are pretty much done by age 15 whereas guys start slower (some never speed up :>))) ) and grow for a longer period. The most remarkable thing at my 10 yr high school reunion was the guys were all an 1' taller than when we graduated where most women quit growing very soon after puberty. 

      Don't tell Todd I said that, but from my perspective most all 12 year olds still have baby teeth - that's big clue.

      I really saw it in Canada; I was their Chief Ref some years ago. I refed some young youth games -mixed teams ages 12-14. The girl players were far ahead of the boys physically - size, weight, physical ability. But at age 16, watch out......... .....

      So Julie, at age 12 you were far ahead of the boys of 12. And were you really playing at age 12?



      Carol

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    • Rfullerfam@aol.com
      So I have read a bunch of emails about rookies and baby teeth, so I am ready to put in mine - Brigit, I am proud of Todd - he got a little beat up BECAUSE he
      Message 2 of 7 , Mar 9, 2007
        So I have read a bunch of emails about rookies and baby teeth, so I am ready to put in mine -
        Brigit, I am proud of Todd - he got a little beat up BECAUSE he was trying to get into it! Besides, who's kid is he? Tell him about me in 1990, I was feeling all powerful, playing that first time at UCSC - I swam the puck towards the goal, you snapped out and tapped the puck, my arm was numb for minutes! My elbow still hurts! If I can take it, Todd can!
        Carol, girls develop 1.73 years before boys because that way, during this critical time in the formation of the male brain, they are just enough bigger to kick the ass of the boys that pester them, thus placing the imprinting that allows the women to control the men for the rest of their lives!
        Back at UCSC, we would play a "teaching" game for the first few weeks after the beginning of the quarter - Brigit would set up a table at registration and several students would show up until we beat them up enough for them to quit. It was a pretty good filter - people who liked UWH enough even though they got kicked a few times, had stitches, sore wrists, ruptured eardrums, kept on playing - I'd guess 1 in 20 of people who showed up after seeing it at registration kept on for a while, maybe went to a tournament. This might work if UWH got the word to SJSU and SCU students at registration time, fall winter spring, three quarters every year!
        I think the plans for a "rookie game" time is great - you need a bunch of old guys like me that don't really want to play that hard anyway to take the leadership role, do some basic coaching. (Not me, my wife has the handle on that imprinting and books my time).
        I think most of us go to hockey to play hard, get ready for the next Worlds, train hard, etc. This is attractive to rookies, to try your hand in the faster game. I used to live to be orange or occasionally red at Ohlone. (That was before I made SJ so attractive to every UWH player in the world that I never got to be red anymore)
        Rookies who have been thru a few rookie sessions, watching regular play in the other playing area, will want to try the regular session. They have to understand that if they are playing in the regular session, they have to take care of themselves, people will forget they are a rookie; especially if they get good fast!
        Well, I'm not showing up much myself, so I feel a little bad about saying anything here, but I figure it's OK since I'm what rookies are all about - replacing people like me! Roger
         
         
         
        -----Original Message-----
        From: hockeybrigit@...
        To: clubpuck@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Fri, 9 Mar 2007 12:06 AM
        Subject: [clubpuck] rookies

        Hi all,
        Just a quick note to tell you that Todd felt a bit beat up tonight.  I know I sound like a whining mom of a 12 year old, but I also have an inside track on how a rookie is feeling; perhaps he is an indicator of how others feel.  I know that Todd is playing very well for a rookie, but when you decide that he is ready for a taste of reality, please try to do it a bit more with slow motion.  He doesn't yet know how to dodge those quick moving curls, so he got kicked in the head a few times.  Yes, it's okay for him to get more challenge, but pace yourselves.  It doesn't have to be an all or nothing kind of thing.  It's a good skill to know how to control your actions and be aware of those around you.
        Brigit

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      • Tom Brown
        ... We need to let rookies decide for themselves (with some hinting) when they want to graduate from red sticks, rookie game etc. Gentle handling is not 0 or
        Message 3 of 7 , Mar 10, 2007
          On Fri, Mar 09, 2007 at 01:17:47PM -0800, Julie Jensen wrote:
          > Thowing a kid or a rookie or both in with highly competitive,
          > physical adults with varying amounts of self-awareness is not the best
          > way to learn. It seems like that at least has been recognized and is
          > being worked on (kudos!). The next question is, how long do you keep
          > the kids/rookies to the rookie game? When do you decide they can be
          > thrown in to the colors? And how long do you handle them gently for
          > once they get there? At some point the kids/rookies need to be out of
          > the way so that people can practice their own game without worrying
          > about them, too.

          We need to let rookies decide for themselves (with some hinting) when
          they want to graduate from red sticks, rookie game etc. Gentle handling
          is not 0 or 1. I think I still get the occasional gentle handling. When
          we have many rookies we need multiple games, separated by time or space.
          Sunday rookie focus is great.

          One or two rookies in a competitive game seems to work when they
          stick out. Glow sticks are a good idea, but brighter would be nicer.
          I've noticed games with half rookies, half experienced players are
          the least successful.

          If you have at least 16 players strongly consider 2 games. For a bit
          of variety split up into red/orange/yellow/green, swap orange/yellow
          at half time, but make orange/yellow only about 1-2 players per time.
          This seems to work well in SF. 4 vs 4 makes the game a little harder
          because you are less likely to have 2-3 players down in good position
          at the same time, but having an even mix of A players and rookies is
          even less helpful.

          I like being in a game dominated by rookies because I can work on
          coaching, am more likely to see other people make the mistakes I do, can
          see significant improvement in players and the team over the course of
          an hour, have more time to look for passes before getting slammed. I
          like being in typical Club Puck games because I'm playing my hardest,
          getting tips and hardly hanging on to the puck so any stop or steal is a
          personal victory.


          Tom


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