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Climate Change/Global Warming

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  • Robert Karl Stonjek
    Mobile aerosol observing units deployed at Cape Cod Bracing against -10 degree Celsius temperatures in Cape Cod, Massachusetts, Brookhaven atmospheric chemist
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 8 5:19 PM
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      Mobile aerosol observing units deployed at Cape Cod
      Bracing against -10 degree Celsius temperatures in Cape Cod, Massachusetts, Brookhaven atmospheric chemist Stephen Springston and his team recently completed a one-week restaging of two portable atmospheric sampling stations used for climate studies. Part of the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility, the Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) consists of two compact, state-of-the-art instrument suites installed in modified shipping containers. The mobile units have complementary research objectives—one is specialized to conduct on-site measurements of aerosol samples, the other to examine the chemical composition of samples—and the two are deployed together.
       
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      Robert Karl Stonjek
    • Robert Karl Stonjek
      El Nino, La Nina unlikely to show up in first half of 2013, WMO says The El Nino and La Nina climate patterns are unlikely to make an appearance during the
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 11 5:23 PM
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        El Nino, La Nina unlikely to show up in first half of 2013, WMO says
        The El Nino and La Nina climate patterns are unlikely to make an appearance during the first half of this year, the UN's weather agency said Monday.
         
        Remote clouds responsible for climate models' glitch in tropical rainfall
        New research shows that cloud biases over the Southern Ocean are the primary contributor to the double-rain band problem that exists in most modern climate models.
         
        Study finds iron from glacial melting could help reduce global warming
        (Phys.org) —A team of researchers from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in the US has found significant amounts of particulate iron in runoff from glacial melting in Greenland. In their paper published in Nature Geoscience, the team notes that such iron could possibly spur the growth of algae, which absorb carbon dioxide.
         
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        Robert Karl Stonjek
      • Robert Karl Stonjek
        Ancient pool of warm water questions current climate models A huge pool of warm water that stretched out from Indonesia over to Africa and South America four
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 3, 2013
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          Ancient pool of warm water questions current climate models
          A huge pool of warm water that stretched out from Indonesia over to Africa and South America four million years ago suggests climate models might be too conservative in forecasting tropical changes.
           
          Breeding birds vulnerable to climate change in Arctic Alaska
          A new report from the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) looked at the vulnerability of 54 breeding bird species to climate change impacts occurring by the year 2050 in Arctic Alaska. The assessment found that two species, the gyrfalcon and common eider are likely to be "highly" vulnerable, while seven other species would be "moderately" vulnerable to anticipated impacts. Five species are likely to increase in number and benefit from a warming climate.
           
          Berkeley code captures retreating Antarctic ice
          Satellite observations suggest that the shrinking West Antarctic ice sheet is contributing to global sea level rise. But until recently, scientists could not accurately model the physical processes driving retreat of the ice sheet. Now, a new ice sheet model—called Berkeley-ISICLES (BISICLES)—is shedding light on these details.
           
          Extreme weather threatens crops, cities: Official report
          Extreme weather caused by global warming poses a growing risk to Australia's crop lands, cities and iconic sites like Kakadu National Park, according to a new report that calls for global emissions to be cut to almost zero by 2050.
           
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          Robert Karl Stonjek
        • Robert Karl Stonjek
          Emeritus: David Wilson was an early proponent of the concept of energy-use fees The concept of a market-based mechanism to curb emissions of greenhouse
          Message 4 of 4 , Nov 5, 2013
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            Emeritus: David Wilson was an early proponent of the concept of energy-use fees
            The concept of a market-based mechanism to curb emissions of greenhouse gases—and thus slow the pace of climate change—has often been suggested in recent decades. But one particular version of such a strategy, devised in the 1970s by MIT professor of mechanical engineering David Gordon Wilson, has been adopted in one form in a Canadian province, as well as in a handful of other places—and, so far, it seems to be having the desired effect.
             
            Diatom algae populations tell a story about climate change in Greenland (w/ Video)
            Researchers try to determine how much this "canary in a coal mine" can say about the impact of a warming climate on the Arctic region.
             
            China climate negotiator laments 'severe' pollution
            China's top negotiator at international climate talks said on Tuesday that air pollution in his own country—the world's biggest carbon emitter—is harming its citizens.
             
            Researchers detail climate-change impacts in ecological journal
            The coming century will bring many changes for natural systems and for the human societies that depend on them, as changing climate conditions ripple outward to changing rainfall patterns, soil nutrient cycles, species ranges, seasonal timing and a multitude of other interconnected factors. Many of these changes have already begun.
             
            More wildfires, earlier snowmelt, coastal threats top Northwest climate risks
            The Pacific Northwest will face increased risks from declining forest health, earlier snowmelt and an array of coastal issues, according to a new comprehensive report on what climate change means for Washington, Oregon and Idaho.
             
            Two-degree global warming limit 'ever more elusive': UN
            The chance of limiting global temperature increases to two degrees Celsius this century are swiftly diminishing, a new United Nations report warned Tuesday, ahead of the body's annual climate talks next week.

            Smoke signals: Tracking the rapid changes of wildfire aerosols
            (Phys.org) —The massive wildfires that recently raged through the Northwest carved trails of tremendous destruction. The stories of these fires—from the devastation to homes and forests to the courageous work of men and women battling the blaze—largely played out across the ground. But wildfire fallout actually extends far into the skies and raises important questions about how smoke can impact climate.

            New ideas needed to meet California's 2050 greenhouse gas targets, study reports
            California is on track to meet its state-mandated targets for reducing greenhouse gas emissions for 2020, but it will not be able to meet its 2050 target without bold new technologies and policies. This is the conclusion of the California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet (GHGIS), a new model developed by the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) to look at how far existing policies and technologies can get us in emissions reductions.

            Global map provides new insights into land use
            In order to assess the global impacts of land use on the environment and help provide appropriate countermeasures, a group of researchers under the leadership of the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) has created a new world map of land use systems. Based on various indicators of land-use intensity, climate, environmental and socio-economic conditions, they identified twelve global patterns called land system archetypes. The scientists from UFZ with colleagues from the Humboldt-University Berlin and University Bonn have recently published their results in the journal Global Environmental Change.

            Anthropogenic aerosols increasing over India
            Aerosol particles in the Earth's atmosphere scatter and absorb light differently at different wavelengths, thereby affecting the amount of incoming sunlight that reaches the planet's surface and the amount of heat that escapes, potentially altering the planet's climate. Most recent regional studies of aerosol trends have used satellite data to examine aerosol levels over ocean regions; fewer regional studies have measured aerosol over land.

            The oldest ice core: Finding a 1.5 million-year record of Earth's climate
            (Phys.org) —How far into the past can ice-core records go? Scientists have now identified regions in Antarctica they say could store information about Earth's climate and greenhouse gases extending as far back as 1.5 million years, almost twice as old as the oldest ice core drilled to date. The results are published today in Climate of the Past, an open access journal of the European Geosciences Union (EGU).

            Polar bear researchers to try crowdsourcing
            Polar bear researchers are experimenting with the idea of crowdsourcing data as they study the effects of climate change on the animals.

            Nature network hope for birds threatened by climate change
            (Phys.org) —New research led by the British Trust for Ornithology and involving a University of York academic provides strong evidence that internationally important British bird populations are being affected by climate change, which could threaten their long-term conservation status.

            Emissions pricing revenues could overcompensate profit losses of fossil fuel owners
            Revenues from global carbon emission pricing could exceed the losses fossil fuel owners suffer from this policy. Stabilizing global warming at around 2 degrees Celsius by cutting greenhouse-gas emissions from fossil fuels would mean to leave much of coal, gas and oil unused underground.

            The oldest ice core: Finding a 1.5 million-year record of Earth's climate
            (Phys.org) —How far into the past can ice-core records go? Scientists have now identified regions in Antarctica they say could store information about Earth's climate and greenhouse gases extending as far back as 1.5 million years, almost twice as old as the oldest ice core drilled to date. The results are published today in Climate of the Past, an open access journal of the European Geosciences Union (EGU).

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            Robert Karl Stonjek

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