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Re: [climate-change-forum] Re: Paper: Local perceptions of climate change validated by scientific evidence in the Himalayas

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  • Alex Harvey
    To indicate that by global warming I mean the orthodox IPCC theory of anthropogenic climate change I suppose, as opposed to, say, hypothetically natural
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 30, 2011
      To indicate that by 'global warming' I mean the orthodox IPCC theory of 'anthropogenic climate change' I suppose, as opposed to, say, hypothetically natural global warming, for instance.

      -Alex

      On 1 May 2011 03:18, hibbsa <hibbsa@...> wrote:
       


      Alex - why do you put global warming in inverted commas?

      --- In climate-change-forum@yahoogroups.com, Alex Harvey


      <alexharv074@...> wrote:
      >
      > These are some very misleading articles that are appearing.
      >
      > It is thought that the present changes in the Himalayas have little to
      do
      > with 'global warming' at this stage, or atmospheric carbon dioxide,
      but are
      > being caused by anthropogenic aerosols and other human forcings like
      land
      > use changes. It will not be until after the year 2350 or so before
      global
      > warming melts away these glaciers on mountains that kilometers above
      sea
      > level.
      >
      > But the reader thinks that 'climate change' means 'global warming'
      caused by
      > anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions. Presumably the villagers
      affected in
      > the Himalayas are being told and understand the same.
      >
      > How does this help anyone? They are being effectively manipulated in
      order
      > to sell action on 'climate change' to policymakers.
      >
      > See for example:
      >
      http://pielkeclimatesci.wordpress.com/2009/12/01/global-warming-and-glac\

      ier-melt-down-debate-a-tempest-in-a-teapot/

      >
      > Or any number of papers on the effects of black carbon and atmospheric
      brown
      > clouds in causing the heating in the atmosphere around the Himalayas.
      >
      > Best,
      > Alex
      >
      > On 29 April 2011 20:16, Robert Karl Stonjek stonjek@... wrote:
      >
      > >
      > >
      > > Local perceptions of climate change validated by scientific evidence
      in the
      > > Himalayas
      > > Pashupati Chaudhary1 and Kamaljit S. Bawa1,2,3
      > >
      > > 1Department of Biology, University of Massachusetts, Boston, MA
      02125,
      > > USA
      > > 2Sustainability Science Program, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA
      02138,
      > > USA
      > > 3Ashoka Trust for Research in Ecology and the Environment, Bangalore
      > > 560024, India
      > >
      > > Author for correspondence (kamal.bawa@...).

      > > Abstract
      > >
      > > The Himalayas are assumed to be undergoing rapid climate change,
      with
      > > serious environmental, social and economic consequences for more
      than two
      > > billion people. However, data on the extent of climate change or its
      impact
      > > on the region are meagre. Based on local knowledge, we report
      perceived
      > > changes in climate and consequences of such changes for biodiversity
      and
      > > agriculture. Our analyses are based on 250 household interviews
      administered
      > > in 18 villages, and focused group discussions conducted in 10
      additional
      > > villages in Darjeeling Hills, West Bengal, India and Ilam district
      of Nepal.
      > > There is a widespread feeling that weather is getting warmer, the
      water
      > > sources are drying up, the onset of summer and monsoon has advanced
      during
      > > last 10 years and there is less snow on mountains than before. Local
      > > perceptions of the impact of climate change on biodiversity included
      early
      > > budburst and flowering, new agricultural pests and weeds and
      appearance of
      > > mosquitoes. People at high altitudes appear more sensitive to
      climate change
      > > than those at low altitudes. Most local perceptions conform to
      scientific
      > > data. Local knowledge can be rapidly and efficiently gathered using
      > > systematic tools. Such knowledge can allow scientists to test
      specific
      > > hypotheses, and policy makers to design mitigation and adaptation
      strategies
      > > for climate change, especially in an extraordinarily important part
      of our
      > > world that is experiencing considerable change.
      > >
      > > Source: The Royal Society
      > >
      > >
      http://rsbl.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/early/2011/04/16/rsbl.201\
      1.0269.abstract?papetoc

      > >
      > > Posted by
      > > Robert Karl Stonjek
      > >
      > >
      >


    • Robert Karl Stonjek
      Local perceptions of climate change validated by scientific evidence in the Himalayas Pashupati Chaudhary1 and Kamaljit S. Bawa1,2,3 1Department of Biology,
      Message 2 of 6 , May 15, 2011

        Local perceptions of climate change validated by scientific evidence in the Himalayas

        Pashupati Chaudhary1 and Kamaljit S. Bawa1,2,3
         
        1Department of Biology, University of Massachusetts, Boston, MA 02125, USA
        2Sustainability Science Program, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
        3Ashoka Trust for Research in Ecology and the Environment, Bangalore 560024, India
        Author for correspondence (kamal.bawa@...).

        Abstract

        The Himalayas are assumed to be undergoing rapid climate change, with serious environmental, social and economic consequences for more than two billion people. However, data on the extent of climate change or its impact on the region are meagre. Based on local knowledge, we report perceived changes in climate and consequences of such changes for biodiversity and agriculture. Our analyses are based on 250 household interviews administered in 18 villages, and focused group discussions conducted in 10 additional villages in Darjeeling Hills, West Bengal, India and Ilam district of Nepal. There is a widespread feeling that weather is getting warmer, the water sources are drying up, the onset of summer and monsoon has advanced during last 10 years and there is less snow on mountains than before. Local perceptions of the impact of climate change on biodiversity included early budburst and flowering, new agricultural pests and weeds and appearance of mosquitoes. People at high altitudes appear more sensitive to climate change than those at low altitudes. Most local perceptions conform to scientific data. Local knowledge can be rapidly and efficiently gathered using systematic tools. Such knowledge can allow scientists to test specific hypotheses, and policy makers to design mitigation and adaptation strategies for climate change, especially in an extraordinarily important part of our world that is experiencing considerable change.

        Source: The Royal Society
        http://rsbl.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/early/2011/05/10/rsbl.2011.0269.abstract?papetoc

        Posted by
        Robert Karl Stonjek

      • Robert Karl Stonjek
        Local perceptions of climate change validated by scientific evidence in the Himalayas Pashupati Chaudhary1 and Kamaljit S. Bawa1,2,3 1Department of Biology,
        Message 3 of 6 , Sep 12, 2011

          Local perceptions of climate change validated by scientific evidence in the Himalayas

          Pashupati Chaudhary1 and Kamaljit S. Bawa1,2,3
           
          1Department of Biology, University of Massachusetts, Boston, MA 02125, USA
          2Sustainability Science Program, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
          3Ashoka Trust for Research in Ecology and the Environment, Bangalore 560024, India
           
          Author for correspondence (kamal.bawa@...).

          Abstract

          The Himalayas are assumed to be undergoing rapid climate change, with serious environmental, social and economic consequences for more than two billion people. However, data on the extent of climate change or its impact on the region are meagre. Based on local knowledge, we report perceived changes in climate and consequences of such changes for biodiversity and agriculture. Our analyses are based on 250 household interviews administered in 18 villages, and focused group discussions conducted in 10 additional villages in Darjeeling Hills, West Bengal, India and Ilam district of Nepal. There is a widespread feeling that weather is getting warmer, the water sources are drying up, the onset of summer and monsoon has advanced during last 10 years and there is less snow on mountains than before. Local perceptions of the impact of climate change on biodiversity included early budburst and flowering, new agricultural pests and weeds and appearance of mosquitoes. People at high altitudes appear more sensitive to climate change than those at low altitudes. Most local perceptions conform to scientific data. Local knowledge can be rapidly and efficiently gathered using systematic tools. Such knowledge can allow scientists to test specific hypotheses, and policy makers to design mitigation and adaptation strategies for climate change, especially in an extraordinarily important part of our world that is experiencing considerable change.

          Source: The Royal Society
          http://rsbl.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/7/5/767.abstract?etoc

          Posted by
          Robert Karl Stonjek

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