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The Scarlet Letter

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  • ksagun13
    Well, I ve started The Scarlet Letter and so far (chapter six) I like it pretty well. Has anyone else had time to start it? I really did want to read this
    Message 1 of 7 , Sep 4, 2007
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      Well, I've started The Scarlet Letter and so far (chapter six) I like
      it pretty well. Has anyone else had time to start it? I really did
      want to read this summer's books, I just had so much else to read, I
      think I was put off by the length. I'm hoping to eventually read all
      the books listed in our database.
    • Frank T
      I actually listened to the book in my car over the last two weeks and found it an interesting story to listen to. I thought I knew the story, but it was a lot
      Message 2 of 7 , Sep 6, 2007
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        I actually listened to the book in my car over the last two weeks and
        found it an interesting story to listen to. I thought I knew the
        story, but it was a lot different than my preconceptions.
        What do you think of Hestherr Prim so far?
        --- In classicsreadinggroup@yahoogroups.com, "ksagun13" <ksagun13@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Well, I've started The Scarlet Letter and so far (chapter six) I like
        > it pretty well. Has anyone else had time to start it? I really did
        > want to read this summer's books, I just had so much else to read, I
        > think I was put off by the length. I'm hoping to eventually read all
        > the books listed in our database.
        >
      • Renee Mouilso
        I also listened to it in my car! I enjoyed it also. Perhaps someone out there is familiar with the author s political and moral beliefs,and could fill us in.
        Message 3 of 7 , Sep 7, 2007
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          I also listened to it in my car!
          I enjoyed it also. Perhaps someone out there is familiar with the author's political and moral beliefs,and could fill us in.
          My impression of the book is that the author believed that adultery was
          1-not absolutely 'wrong' morally or at the very least , a crime whose 'sin' can be absolved
          2- an act whose punishment is unfairly suffered by just the woman
          3-is a common enough occurrence that society should learn to deal with it in a more tolerant manner.

          Or am I reading my 21st century morals into the book?

          My mother,a very open-minded & intelligent woman,told me that her high school teacher reprimanded her bitterly for reading this book (in the 1930's).I had assumed that the reprimand had been over the subject matter "Adultery".However ,now that I've read the book,I'm wondering if the reaction had been to the message of the book: that adulteresses can be 'saved' , are still human beings,that their offspring are innocent & worthy of life ,liberty & the pursuit of happiness, that the males who participate in adultery often are anonymous & unpunished, and could just be the perceived pillars of morality in the community!
          Renee



          Frank T <XTONTOX@...> wrote: I actually listened to the book in my car over the last two weeks and
          found it an interesting story to listen to. I thought I knew the
          story, but it was a lot different than my preconceptions.
          What do you think of Hestherr Prim so far?
          --- In classicsreadinggroup@yahoogroups.com, "ksagun13" <ksagun13@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > Well, I've started The Scarlet Letter and so far (chapter six) I like
          > it pretty well. Has anyone else had time to start it? I really did
          > want to read this summer's books, I just had so much else to read, I
          > think I was put off by the length. I'm hoping to eventually read all
          > the books listed in our database.
          >






          ---------------------------------
          Building a website is a piece of cake.
          Yahoo! Small Business gives you all the tools to get online.

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • ksagun13
          Interesting that back in the day your mother was reprimanded for reading this -- I think this is one of the classics that is required reading for many high
          Message 4 of 7 , Sep 7, 2007
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            Interesting that back in the day your mother was reprimanded for
            reading this -- I think this is one of the classics that is required
            reading for many high school English classes (however, not mine -- I
            think I'm one of the only people in America that didn't have to read
            this book in high school!)

            Karen S.

            --- In classicsreadinggroup@yahoogroups.com, Renee Mouilso
            <r_mouilso@...> wrote:
            >
            > I also listened to it in my car!
            > I enjoyed it also. Perhaps someone out there is familiar with the
            author's political and moral beliefs,and could fill us in.
            > My impression of the book is that the author believed that adultery
            was
            > 1-not absolutely 'wrong' morally or at the very least , a crime
            whose 'sin' can be absolved
            > 2- an act whose punishment is unfairly suffered by just the woman
            > 3-is a common enough occurrence that society should learn to deal
            with it in a more tolerant manner.
            >
            > Or am I reading my 21st century morals into the book?
            >
            > My mother,a very open-minded & intelligent woman,told me that her
            high school teacher reprimanded her bitterly for reading this book
            (in the 1930's).I had assumed that the reprimand had been over the
            subject matter "Adultery".However ,now that I've read the book,I'm
            wondering if the reaction had been to the message of the book: that
            adulteresses can be 'saved' , are still human beings,that their
            offspring are innocent & worthy of life ,liberty & the pursuit of
            happiness, that the males who participate in adultery often are
            anonymous & unpunished, and could just be the perceived pillars of
            morality in the community!
            > Renee
          • blueeyesmeg
            I read this novel several years ago and just recently read The House of Seven Gables. Hawthorne seems to deal in sin and how others are affected by such; and
            Message 5 of 7 , Sep 7, 2007
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              I read this novel several years ago and just recently read The House
              of Seven Gables. Hawthorne seems to deal in sin and how others are
              affected by such; and how such sins lead to more trouble making.
              I remember Hester as my heroine. She was strong and resolute in her
              stand not to reveal her lover. Whilst Dimmesdale wasn't a person you
              could admire, though he was torn by guilt. I was annoyed that he
              wouldn't admit he was Pearl's father and left Hester to shoulder all
              the blame and to be shunned by his congregation. And as for
              Chillingworth, I just held him in contempt as he was the real
              sinner. Poor Pearl, the child inherited her parent's sin and guilt,
              but is more accepting of it than the puritan society.

              Meg


              --- In classicsreadinggroup@yahoogroups.com, Renee Mouilso
              <r_mouilso@...> wrote:
              >
              > I also listened to it in my car!
              > I enjoyed it also. Perhaps someone out there is familiar with the
              author's political and moral beliefs,and could fill us in.
              > My impression of the book is that the author believed that adultery
              was
              > 1-not absolutely 'wrong' morally or at the very least , a crime
              whose 'sin' can be absolved
              > 2- an act whose punishment is unfairly suffered by just the woman
              > 3-is a common enough occurrence that society should learn to deal
              with it in a more tolerant manner.
              >
              > Or am I reading my 21st century morals into the book?
              >
              > My mother,a very open-minded & intelligent woman,told me that her
              high school teacher reprimanded her bitterly for reading this book
              (in the 1930's).I had assumed that the reprimand had been over the
              subject matter "Adultery".However ,now that I've read the book,I'm
              wondering if the reaction had been to the message of the book: that
              adulteresses can be 'saved' , are still human beings,that their
              offspring are innocent & worthy of life ,liberty & the pursuit of
              happiness, that the males who participate in adultery often are
              anonymous & unpunished, and could just be the perceived pillars of
              morality in the community!
              > Renee
              >
              >
              >
              > Frank T <XTONTOX@...> wrote: I
              actually listened to the book in my car over the last two weeks and
              > found it an interesting story to listen to. I thought I knew the
              > story, but it was a lot different than my preconceptions.
              > What do you think of Hestherr Prim so far?
              > --- In classicsreadinggroup@yahoogroups.com, "ksagun13"
              <ksagun13@>
              > wrote:
              > >
              > > Well, I've started The Scarlet Letter and so far (chapter six) I
              like
              > > it pretty well. Has anyone else had time to start it? I really
              did
              > > want to read this summer's books, I just had so much else to
              read, I
              > > think I was put off by the length. I'm hoping to eventually
              read all
              > > the books listed in our database.
              > >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > ---------------------------------
              > Building a website is a piece of cake.
              > Yahoo! Small Business gives you all the tools to get online.
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
            • blueeyesmeg
              Hi Karen, here in Australia we didn t read many American novels, mainly English ones. And, anyway Australians wouldn t commit adultery, or should I say get
              Message 6 of 7 , Sep 7, 2007
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                Hi Karen, here in Australia we didn't read many American novels,
                mainly English ones. And, anyway Australians wouldn't commit
                adultery, or should I say get caught -lol.

                Meg

                --- In classicsreadinggroup@yahoogroups.com, "ksagun13"
                <ksagun13@...> wrote:
                >
                > Interesting that back in the day your mother was reprimanded for
                > reading this -- I think this is one of the classics that is
                required
                > reading for many high school English classes (however, not mine --
                I
                > think I'm one of the only people in America that didn't have to
                read
                > this book in high school!)
                >
                > Karen S.
                >
                > --- In classicsreadinggroup@yahoogroups.com, Renee Mouilso
                > <r_mouilso@> wrote:
                > >
                > > I also listened to it in my car!
                > > I enjoyed it also. Perhaps someone out there is familiar with the
                > author's political and moral beliefs,and could fill us in.
                > > My impression of the book is that the author believed that
                adultery
                > was
                > > 1-not absolutely 'wrong' morally or at the very least , a crime
                > whose 'sin' can be absolved
                > > 2- an act whose punishment is unfairly suffered by just the woman
                > > 3-is a common enough occurrence that society should learn to deal
                > with it in a more tolerant manner.
                > >
                > > Or am I reading my 21st century morals into the book?
                > >
                > > My mother,a very open-minded & intelligent woman,told me that her
                > high school teacher reprimanded her bitterly for reading this book
                > (in the 1930's).I had assumed that the reprimand had been over the
                > subject matter "Adultery".However ,now that I've read the book,I'm
                > wondering if the reaction had been to the message of the book: that
                > adulteresses can be 'saved' , are still human beings,that their
                > offspring are innocent & worthy of life ,liberty & the pursuit of
                > happiness, that the males who participate in adultery often are
                > anonymous & unpunished, and could just be the perceived pillars of
                > morality in the community!
                > > Renee
                >
              • Frank T
                ... was ... whose sin can be absolved ... with it in a more tolerant manner. ... I don t believe you are reading your 21st century morals into it at all. I
                Message 7 of 7 , Sep 8, 2007
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                  --- In classicsreadinggroup@yahoogroups.com, Renee Mouilso
                  <r_mouilso@...> wrote:
                  > My impression of the book is that the author believed that adultery
                  was
                  > 1-not absolutely 'wrong' morally or at the very least , a crime
                  whose 'sin' can be absolved
                  > 2- an act whose punishment is unfairly suffered by just the woman
                  > 3-is a common enough occurrence that society should learn to deal
                  with it in a more tolerant manner.
                  >
                  > Or am I reading my 21st century morals into the book?
                  I don't believe you are reading your 21st century morals into it at
                  all. I got the same impressions that you did.
                  I found the story about your mother fascinating, and I think you are
                  right that her teacher didn't want her exposed to the messages in the
                  book.
                  FrankT
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