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A Moveable feast

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  • Frank T
    I have read the first few vignettes in the book and am finiding it an interesting look at a young Hemingway. Anyone else reading the book? FrankT
    Message 1 of 7 , May 6, 2007
      I have read the first few vignettes in the book and am finiding it an
      interesting look at a young Hemingway. Anyone else reading the book?
      FrankT
    • ksagun13
      Yes, I ve just started it. I was hoping to take it on my trip and my library copy is hardcover, so I m hesitating. Maybe I ll buy my own copy while I m in
      Message 2 of 7 , May 6, 2007
        Yes, I've just started it. I was hoping to take it on my trip and my
        library copy is hardcover, so I'm hesitating. Maybe I'll buy my own
        copy while I'm in Paris!

        So far I do like what I've read. If this is set in the early 20s,
        Hemingway must have been only 22 or 23 when this was written. I wonder
        if Gertrude Stein's companion was Alice B. Toklas. I'll look into this.

        Karen S.

        --- In classicsreadinggroup@yahoogroups.com, "Frank T" <XTONTOX@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > I have read the first few vignettes in the book and am finiding it an
        > interesting look at a young Hemingway. Anyone else reading the book?
        > FrankT
        >
      • Renee Mouilso
        I start it this week!! Renee Frank T wrote: I have read the first few vignettes in the book and am finiding
        Message 3 of 7 , May 6, 2007
          I start it this week!!
          Renee

          Frank T <XTONTOX@...> wrote: I have read the first few vignettes in the book and am finiding it an
          interesting look at a young Hemingway. Anyone else reading the book?
          FrankT






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        • Keeva Smotherman
          I pick up my copy today. I read it in college, but, of course, reading something for pleasure is always a different experience. Frank T
          Message 4 of 7 , May 7, 2007
            I pick up my copy today. I read it in college, but, of course, reading something for pleasure is always a different experience.



            Frank T <XTONTOX@...> wrote:
            I have read the first few vignettes in the book and am finiding it an
            interesting look at a young Hemingway. Anyone else reading the book?
            FrankT






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          • Chris Lott
            ... I suspect it must be... Alice Toklas started living with Stein by 1910... As much as you can trust the Wikipedia, it notes: Ernest Hemingway describes how
            Message 5 of 7 , May 11, 2007
              On 5/6/07, ksagun13 <ksagun13@...> wrote:
              >
              > So far I do like what I've read. If this is set in the early 20s,
              > Hemingway must have been only 22 or 23 when this was written. I wonder
              > if Gertrude Stein's companion was Alice B. Toklas. I'll look into this.

              I suspect it must be... Alice Toklas started living with Stein by 1910...

              As much as you can trust the Wikipedia, it notes: "Ernest Hemingway
              describes how Alice was Gertrude's 'wife' in that Stein rarely
              addressed his (Hemingway's) wife, and he treated Alice the same,
              leaving the two "wives" to chat."

              c
              --
              Chris Lott
            • Renee
              Hi Chris-- While I must admit I haven t begun the book yet,I do know a little bit about Gertrude/ Alice. I once googled them & the photos from the day were
              Message 6 of 7 , May 17, 2007
                Hi Chris--
                While I must admit I haven't begun the book yet,I do know a little bit
                about Gertrude/ Alice. I once googled them & the photos from the day
                were remarkable. Gertrude was quite masculine---did not COULD not hide
                that, with very short cropped hair & even donning what appears to be
                men's suits. Alice was more traditionally feminine, with tailored
                dresses,suits & hats. They seemed to be an openly gay couple to their
                friends and peers---and were well loved in the region by soldiers,who
                directly received their aid, as Gertrude & Alice actively collected
                provisions to help the men fighting in the field, then drove trucks
                filled with supplies & distributed the items themselves. They were
                quite heroic in their efforts. To the outside world, Gertrude was a
                'genius', Alice was her companion & secretary/ typist---typing up
                Gertrude's manuscripts. And no one seemed to judge or care about the
                personal living arrangement!
                How forward thinking was that!
                PS GS's most famous line: A rose is a rose is a rose is a rose (not
                sure how long that goes on). I 'read' a few of her works in college
                and they are extremely hard to comprehend---she was really 'out there'
                in her thinking patterns!
                Renee

                --- In classicsreadinggroup@yahoogroups.com, "Chris Lott"
                <chris.lott@...> wrote:
                >
                > On 5/6/07, ksagun13 <ksagun13@...> wrote:
                > >
                > > So far I do like what I've read. If this is set in the early 20s,
                > > Hemingway must have been only 22 or 23 when this was written. I
                wonder
                > > if Gertrude Stein's companion was Alice B. Toklas. I'll look
                into this.
                >
                > I suspect it must be... Alice Toklas started living with Stein by
                1910...
                >
                > As much as you can trust the Wikipedia, it notes: "Ernest Hemingway
                > describes how Alice was Gertrude's 'wife' in that Stein rarely
                > addressed his (Hemingway's) wife, and he treated Alice the same,
                > leaving the two "wives" to chat."
                >
                > c
                > --
                > Chris Lott
                >
              • Chris Lott
                ... Thanks for those details... they are very interesting. I ve read a fair amount of Stein (her writing was definitely experimental-- not my kind of thing,
                Message 7 of 7 , May 17, 2007
                  On 5/17/07, Renee <r_mouilso@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > Hi Chris--
                  > While I must admit I haven't begun the book yet,I do know a little bit
                  > about Gertrude/ Alice. I once googled them & the photos from the day
                  > were remarkable. Gertrude was quite masculine---did not COULD not hide
                  > that, with very short cropped hair & even donning what appears to be
                  > men's suits. Alice was more traditionally feminine, with tailored
                  > dresses,suits & hats. They seemed to be an openly gay couple to their
                  > friends and peers---and were well loved in the region by soldiers,who
                  > directly received their aid, as Gertrude & Alice actively collected
                  > provisions to help the men fighting in the field, then drove trucks
                  > filled with supplies & distributed the items themselves. They were
                  > quite heroic in their efforts. To the outside world, Gertrude was a
                  > 'genius', Alice was her companion & secretary/ typist---typing up
                  > Gertrude's manuscripts. And no one seemed to judge or care about the
                  > personal living arrangement!
                  > How forward thinking was that!
                  > PS GS's most famous line: A rose is a rose is a rose is a rose (not
                  > sure how long that goes on). I 'read' a few of her works in college
                  > and they are extremely hard to comprehend---she was really 'out there'
                  > in her thinking patterns!

                  Thanks for those details... they are very interesting. I've read a
                  fair amount of Stein (her writing was definitely experimental-- not my
                  kind of thing, though occasionally something would really move me,
                  like any number of snippets from _Tender Buttons_), but knew very
                  little about her (or Alice Toklas).

                  c
                  --
                  Chris Lott
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