Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Heart of Darkness

Expand Messages
  • blueeyesmeg
    The following is taken from the website: http://home.nc.rr.com/jhartzog/heartofdarknessintro.html Historical Context Joseph Conrad captained a steamboat up
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 3, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      The following is taken from the website:
      http://home.nc.rr.com/jhartzog/heartofdarknessintro.html

      "Historical Context
      Joseph Conrad captained a steamboat up the Congo in 1890. He wrote
      Heart of Darkness in 1899. At the time Conrad went up the Congo, the
      region he travelled in was The Congo Free State, a million square
      miles in central Africa that was the personal property of King
      Leopold II of Belgium. It was established in 1884 and remained his
      personal kingdom until 1908.

      The Europeans justified their exploitation of Africa with the
      rhetoric of bringing European Civilization to the Dark Continent--the
      Light of Christianity and the value of work, with a Capital W. The
      dominant views were nicely summed up and expressed in Ruyard
      Kipling's The White Man's Burden which was written the same year as
      Heart of Darkness. Europeans and Americans had a sacred duty to bring
      enlightnment and progress, civilization and economic development to
      the Land of Darkness."


      The White Man's Burden by Kipling

      Take up the White Man's burden--
      Send forth the best ye breed--
      Go, bind your sons to exile
      To serve your captives' need;
      To wait, in heavy harness,
      On fluttered folk and wild--
      Your new-caught sullen peoples,
      Half devil and half child.

      Take up the White Man's burden--
      In patience to abide,
      To veil the threat of terror
      And check the show of pride;
      By open speech and simple,
      An hundred times made plain,
      To seek another's profit
      And work another's gain.

      Take up the White Man's burden--
      The savage wars of peace--
      Fill full the mouth of Famine,
      And bid the sickness cease;
      And when your goal is nearest
      (The end for others sought)
      Watch sloth and heathen folly
      Bring all your hope to nought.

      Take up the White Man's burden--
      No iron rule of kings,
      But toil of serf and sweeper--
      The tale of common things.
      The ports ye shall not enter,
      The roads ye shall not tread,
      Go, make them with your living
      And mark them with your dead.

      Take up the White Man's burden,
      And reap his old reward--
      The blame of those ye better
      The hate of those ye guard--
      The cry of hosts ye humour
      (Ah, slowly!) toward the light:--
      "Why brought ye us from bondage,
      Our loved Egyptian night?"

      Take up the White Man's burden--
      Ye dare not stoop to less--
      Nor call too loud on Freedom
      To cloak your weariness.
      By all ye will or whisper,
      By all ye leave or do,
      The silent sullen peoples
      Shall weigh your God and you.

      Take up the White Man's burden!
      Have done with childish days--
      The lightly-proffered laurel,
      The easy ungrudged praise:
      Comes now, to search your manhood
      Through all the thankless years,
      Cold, edged with dear-bought wisdom,
      The judgment of your peers.

      Meg
    • Lisa Hill
      Thanks so much for this, Meg, I have heard this expression so many times, but had never seen the poem. Amazing, eh? Lisa in Oz ... From:
      Message 2 of 4 , Oct 4, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        Thanks so much for this, Meg, I have heard this expression so many times,
        but had never seen the poem.

        Amazing, eh?

        Lisa in Oz



        -----Original Message-----
        From: classicsreadinggroup@yahoogroups.com
        [mailto:classicsreadinggroup@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of blueeyesmeg
        Sent: Wednesday, 4 October 2006 12:32 PM
        To: classicsreadinggroup@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [CRG] Heart of Darkness



        The following is taken from the website:
        http://home. <http://home.nc.rr.com/jhartzog/heartofdarknessintro.html>
        nc.rr.com/jhartzog/heartofdarknessintro.html

        "Historical Context
        Joseph Conrad captained a steamboat up the Congo in 1890. He wrote
        Heart of Darkness in 1899. At the time Conrad went up the Congo, the
        region he travelled in was The Congo Free State, a million square
        miles in central Africa that was the personal property of King
        Leopold II of Belgium. It was established in 1884 and remained his
        personal kingdom until 1908.

        The Europeans justified their exploitation of Africa with the
        rhetoric of bringing European Civilization to the Dark Continent--the
        Light of Christianity and the value of work, with a Capital W. The
        dominant views were nicely summed up and expressed in Ruyard
        Kipling's The White Man's Burden which was written the same year as
        Heart of Darkness. Europeans and Americans had a sacred duty to bring
        enlightnment and progress, civilization and economic development to
        the Land of Darkness."

        The White Man's Burden by Kipling

        Take up the White Man's burden--
        Send forth the best ye breed--
        Go, bind your sons to exile
        To serve your captives' need;
        To wait, in heavy harness,
        On fluttered folk and wild--
        Your new-caught sullen peoples,
        Half devil and half child.

        Take up the White Man's burden--
        In patience to abide,
        To veil the threat of terror
        And check the show of pride;
        By open speech and simple,
        An hundred times made plain,
        To seek another's profit
        And work another's gain.

        Take up the White Man's burden--
        The savage wars of peace--
        Fill full the mouth of Famine,
        And bid the sickness cease;
        And when your goal is nearest
        (The end for others sought)
        Watch sloth and heathen folly
        Bring all your hope to nought.

        Take up the White Man's burden--
        No iron rule of kings,
        But toil of serf and sweeper--
        The tale of common things.
        The ports ye shall not enter,
        The roads ye shall not tread,
        Go, make them with your living
        And mark them with your dead.

        Take up the White Man's burden,
        And reap his old reward--
        The blame of those ye better
        The hate of those ye guard--
        The cry of hosts ye humour
        (Ah, slowly!) toward the light:--
        "Why brought ye us from bondage,
        Our loved Egyptian night?"

        Take up the White Man's burden--
        Ye dare not stoop to less--
        Nor call too loud on Freedom
        To cloak your weariness.
        By all ye will or whisper,
        By all ye leave or do,
        The silent sullen peoples
        Shall weigh your God and you.

        Take up the White Man's burden!
        Have done with childish days--
        The lightly-proffered laurel,
        The easy ungrudged praise:
        Comes now, to search your manhood
        Through all the thankless years,
        Cold, edged with dear-bought wisdom,
        The judgment of your peers.

        Meg







        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • blueeyesmeg
        Good to see you here Liz. I too had never read the poem before. Meg ... times,
        Message 3 of 4 , Oct 4, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          Good to see you here Liz. I too had never read the poem before.

          Meg

          --- In classicsreadinggroup@yahoogroups.com, "Lisa Hill"
          <gunung2@...> wrote:
          >
          > Thanks so much for this, Meg, I have heard this expression so many
          times,
          > but had never seen the poem.
          >
          > Amazing, eh?
          >
          > Lisa in Oz
          > The White Man's Burden by Kipling
          >
          > Take up the White Man's burden--
          > Send forth the best ye breed--
          > Go, bind your sons to exile
          > To serve your captives' need;
          > To wait, in heavy harness,
          > On fluttered folk and wild--
          > Your new-caught sullen peoples,
          > Half devil and half child.
        • magicalxrealism
          Oh, I ve seen this poem before! I think it may be kind of confusing, but after you finish HoD it ll make more sense. I think the white man s burden is
          Message 4 of 4 , Oct 5, 2006
          • 0 Attachment
            Oh, I've seen this poem before! I think it may be kind of confusing,
            but after you finish HoD it'll make more sense. I think the "white
            man's burden" is referring to how Europeans thought it was their
            responsibility to educate and make tribal people in places like Africa
            "civilized." It's an interesting poem to analyze and see that it's
            really a jab at the "white man." Like HoD is.
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.