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RE: [CRG] Final vote tally/January nominations

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  • Sarah Di-Bella
    I like the sound of New Grub Street for January’s read. Sarah _____ From: Frank T [mailto:xtontox@yahoo.com] Sent: 30 November 2004 11:46 To:
    Message 1 of 19 , Nov 30, 2004
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      I like the sound of New Grub Street for January�s read.

      Sarah



      _____

      From: Frank T [mailto:xtontox@...]
      Sent: 30 November 2004 11:46
      To: classicsreadinggroup@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [CRG] Final vote tally/January nominations




      New Grub Street. - George Gissing 11111

      A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, by James Joyce. 11111

      The Charterhouse of Parma by Stendhal. 1

      The Idiot_ By Fyodor Dostoevsky:

      If on a Winter's Night a Traveler- Italo Calvino

      Oliver Twist - Charles Dickens 111111

      The Monk by Matthew Lewis 11

      Dubliners - James Joyce 1

      Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy
      and the winner is Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens with 6 votes.
      Sorry so late this momth. So as not to let iy happen again I will
      start taking nominations now for January's read. Only one nomination
      per member please.
      Hope you all enjoy Oliver Twist. I will try and get a copy sometime
      this week.
      FrankT





      The October book is _Ethan Frome_ by Edith Wharton.






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    • MandyCandyLand@comcast.net
      One Hundred Years of Solitude- Gabriel Garcia Marquez. One of the 20th century s enduring works, One Hundred Years of Solitude is a widely beloved and
      Message 2 of 19 , Nov 30, 2004
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        One Hundred Years of Solitude- Gabriel Garcia Marquez.

        One of the 20th century's enduring works, One Hundred Years of Solitude is a widely beloved and acclaimed novel known throughout the world, and the ultimate achievement in a Nobel Prize�winning career.
        The novel tells the story of the rise and fall of the mythical town of Macondo through the history of the Buend�a family. It is a rich and brilliant chronicle of life and death, and the tragicomedy of humankind. In the noble, ridiculous, beautiful, and tawdry story of the Buend�a family, one sees all of humanity, just as in the history, myths, growth, and decay of Macondo, one sees all of Latin America.
        Love and lust, war and revolution, riches and poverty, youth and senility -- the variety of life, the endlessness of death, the search for peace and truth -- these universal themes dominate the novel. Whether he is describing an affair of passion or the voracity of capitalism and the corruption of government, Gabriel Garc�a M�rquez always writes with the simplicity, ease, and purity that are the mark of a master.
        Alternately reverential and comical, One Hundred Years of Solitude weaves the political, personal, and spiritual to bring a new consciousness to storytelling. Translated into dozens of languages, this stunning work is no less than an accounting of the history of the human race.

        -------------- Original message --------------

        New Grub Street. - George Gissing 11111

        A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, by James Joyce. 11111

        The Charterhouse of Parma by Stendhal. 1

        The Idiot_ By Fyodor Dostoevsky:

        If on a Winter's Night a Traveler- Italo Calvino

        Oliver Twist - Charles Dickens 111111

        The Monk by Matthew Lewis 11

        Dubliners - James Joyce 1

        Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy
        and the winner is Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens with 6 votes.
        Sorry so late this momth. So as not to let iy happen again I will
        start taking nominations now for January's read. Only one nomination
        per member please.
        Hope you all enjoy Oliver Twist. I will try and get a copy sometime
        this week.
        FrankT





        The October book is _Ethan Frome_ by Edith Wharton.


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        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • frank
        If it isn t I ll nominate DOn Quixote. I ve always wanted to read it. Frank ... ===== May you have the greatest two gifts of all on these holidays; someone to
        Message 3 of 19 , Dec 1, 2004
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          If it isn't I'll nominate DOn Quixote. I've always
          wanted to read it.

          Frank
          --- ajs <ariannah@...> wrote:

          > Is sending 2 nominations ok? If only one is
          > acceptable, then I'll
          > nominate the first one.
          >
          > Thanks
          > Ariannah
          >
          > 1. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
          >
          > Pride and Prejudice, which opens with one of the
          > most famous sentences
          > in English Literature, is an ironic novel of
          > manners. In it the
          > garrulous and empty-headed Mrs Bennet has only one
          > aim - that of
          > finding a good match for each of her five daughters.
          > In this she is
          > mocked by her cynical and indolent husband.
          >
          > With its wit, its social precision and, above all,
          > its irresistible
          > heroine, Pride and Prejudice has proved one of the
          > most enduringly
          > popular novels in the English language.
          >
          > 2. Don Quixote by Cervantes
          >
          > Cervantes' tale of the deranged gentleman who turns
          > knight-errant,
          > tilts at windmills and battles with sheep in the
          > service of the lady
          > of his dreams, Dulcinea del Toboso, has fascinated
          > generations of
          > readers, and inspired other creative artists such as
          > Flaubert, Picasso
          > and Richard Strauss. The tall, thin knight and his
          > short,fat squire,
          > Sancho Panza, have found their way into films,
          > cartoons and even
          > computer games. Supposedly intended as a parody of
          > the most popular
          > escapist fiction of the day, the 'books of
          > chivalry', this precursor
          > of the modern novel broadened and deepened into a
          > sophisticated, comic
          > account of the contradictions of human nature.
          > Cervantes' greatest work can be enjoyed on many
          > levels, all suffused
          > with a subtle irony that reaches out to encompass
          > the reader.
          >


          =====


          "May you have the greatest two gifts of all on these holidays; someone to love and someone who loves you."
          John Sinor


























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        • Floinct@aol.com
          Jane Austen is a wonderful writer! [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          Message 4 of 19 , Dec 1, 2004
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            Jane Austen is a wonderful writer!


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • David Christie
            On Wednesday, December 1, 2004, at 02:44 PM, MandyCandyLand@comcast.net ... I have failed to finish this twice but would quite like to have another go, this
            Message 5 of 19 , Dec 1, 2004
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              On Wednesday, December 1, 2004, at 02:44 PM, MandyCandyLand@...
              wrote:

              >
              >
              > One Hundred Years of Solitude- Gabriel Garcia Marquez.
              >
              > One of the 20th century's enduring works, One Hundred Years
              > of Solitude is a widely beloved and acclaimed novel known throughout
              > the world, and the ultimate achievement in a Nobel Prize–winning
              > career.
              >

              I have failed to finish this twice but would quite like to have another
              go, this time with some moral support.
              I vote for One Hundred Years of Solitude !
              David C
            • Michael Parker
              ... Is this the Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes or the Don Quixote by Kathy Acker? Oh, I know, but the Acker would be very interesting even if it s not
              Message 6 of 19 , Dec 1, 2004
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                Frank wrote:

                > If it isn't I'll nominate Don Quixote. I've
                > always wanted to read it.

                Is this the Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes or the Don Quixote by
                Kathy Acker? Oh, I know, but the Acker would be very interesting even
                if it's not really a classic. I highly recommend the new translation of
                the Cervantes version; it's good clean prose and removes some of the
                confusion without harming the story. DQ is a bit over 900 pages so be
                prepared.

                --
                Low-Country Mike (Still in New Jersey)

                "The modern conservative is engaged in one of man's oldest exercises in
                moral philosophy: that is the search for a superior moral justification
                for selfishness." -- John Kenneth Galbraith

                A Celebration of Reading
                ..... @ http://homepage.mac.com/mparker_46/ACOR
                Yahoo Reading Groups:
                ..... BFB @ http://groups.yahoo.com/group/BFB_Readers
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                ..... Bill @ http://groups.yahoo.com/group/BillShakespeare
              • ajs
                ... Cervantes. I didn t even know there was any other Don Quixote. Sacrilege ;) Ariannah in Halifax
                Message 7 of 19 , Dec 1, 2004
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                  > Is this the Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes or the Don Quixote by
                  > Kathy Acker?

                  Cervantes. I didn't even know there was any other Don Quixote.
                  Sacrilege ;)
                  Ariannah in Halifax
                • Michael Parker
                  ... You know those naughty postmodernists just love to re-do old texts. -- Low-Country Mike (Still in New Jersey) Fascism should more appropriately be called
                  Message 8 of 19 , Dec 1, 2004
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                    Ariannah wrote:

                    > Cervantes. I didn't even know there was any other
                    > Don Quixote. Sacrilege ;)

                    You know those naughty postmodernists just love to re-do old texts.

                    --
                    Low-Country Mike (Still in New Jersey)

                    "Fascism should more appropriately be called Corporatism because it is
                    a merger of State and corporate power." -- Benito Mussolini

                    A Celebration of Reading
                    ..... @ http://homepage.mac.com/mparker_46/ACOR
                    Yahoo Reading Groups:
                    ..... BFB @ http://groups.yahoo.com/group/BFB_Readers
                    ..... LSG @ http://groups.yahoo.com/group/LiteratureStudyGroup
                    ..... Bill @ http://groups.yahoo.com/group/BillShakespeare
                  • MandyCandyLand@comcast.net
                    Really? I keep having to put it down to read required books from professors but it s so hard to let go of. And you can find it everywhere used because Oprah
                    Message 9 of 19 , Dec 1, 2004
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                      Really? I keep having to put it down to read required books from professors but it's so hard to let go of. And you can find it everywhere used because Oprah read it in her book club.

                      -------------- Original message --------------


                      On Wednesday, December 1, 2004, at 02:44 PM, MandyCandyLand@...
                      wrote:

                      >
                      >
                      > One Hundred Years of Solitude- Gabriel Garcia Marquez.
                      >
                      > One of the 20th century's enduring works, One Hundred Years
                      > of Solitude is a widely beloved and acclaimed novel known throughout
                      > the world, and the ultimate achievement in a Nobel Prize�winning
                      > career.
                      >

                      I have failed to finish this twice but would quite like to have another
                      go, this time with some moral support.
                      I vote for One Hundred Years of Solitude !
                      David C






                      The October book is _Ethan Frome_ by Edith Wharton.


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                      Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • MandyCandyLand@comcast.net
                      I read Don Quixote and was very disappointed with my translation ah, I have the Penguin Classics version. Despite the translation, however, the 1000ish page
                      Message 10 of 19 , Dec 1, 2004
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                        I read Don Quixote and was very disappointed with my translation ah, I have the Penguin Classics version. Despite the translation, however, the 1000ish page book went extremely quickly. Finished in 5 days during finals week- don't let the pages keep you from reading it.

                        -------------- Original message --------------
                        Frank wrote:

                        > If it isn't I'll nominate Don Quixote. I've
                        > always wanted to read it.

                        Is this the Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes or the Don Quixote by
                        Kathy Acker? Oh, I know, but the Acker would be very interesting even
                        if it's not really a classic. I highly recommend the new translation of
                        the Cervantes version; it's good clean prose and removes some of the
                        confusion without harming the story. DQ is a bit over 900 pages so be
                        prepared.
                      • Anna
                        I d like to nominate Mary Barton by Elizabeth Gaskell. Mary Barton(1848),subtitled A Tale of Manchester Life ,is the first novel by Mrs Gaskell(1810-65).The
                        Message 11 of 19 , Dec 2, 2004
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                          I'd like to nominate Mary Barton by Elizabeth Gaskell.

                          Mary Barton(1848),subtitled 'A Tale of Manchester Life',is the first novel
                          by Mrs Gaskell(1810-65).The entirely working-class cast of characters in
                          this novel was then an innovation.The background story is Manchester in the
                          'hungry forties'and the acute poverty of the unemployed mill-hands. Mary
                          Batson,daughter of an embittered worker,wins the attention of Henry
                          Carson,son of one of the employers.But a group of workmen plot his murder as
                          a warning to his class,and it falls upon Mary's father to perform the
                          deed.Suspicion lies with Mary's working class admirer,Jed,who is tried for
                          his life.

                          Anna

                          >
                        • frank
                          I was going for the Cervantes one, seeing as i ve never heard of the other. What s it about? Frank
                          Message 12 of 19 , Dec 2, 2004
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                            I was going for the Cervantes one, seeing as i've
                            never heard of the other. What's it about?

                            Frank
                            --- Michael Parker <mparker-46@...> wrote:

                            > Frank wrote:
                            >
                            > > If it isn't I'll nominate Don Quixote. I've
                            > > always wanted to read it.
                            >
                            > Is this the Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes or
                            > the Don Quixote by
                            > Kathy Acker? Oh, I know, but the Acker would be very
                            > interesting even
                            > if it's not really a classic. I highly recommend the
                            > new translation of
                            > the Cervantes version; it's good clean prose and
                            > removes some of the
                            > confusion without harming the story. DQ is a bit
                            > over 900 pages so be
                            > prepared.
                            >
                            > --
                            > Low-Country Mike (Still in New Jersey)
                          • Frank T
                            Sorry I don t count votes until after the nominatios are all in. It makes the logistics a whole lot easier that way. I will set up the vote on Monday as I
                            Message 13 of 19 , Dec 3, 2004
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                              Sorry I don't count votes until after the nominatios are all in. It
                              makes the logistics a whole lot easier that way. I will set up the
                              vote on Monday as I like to give at least one weekend for
                              nominations or voting.
                              FrankT
                              --- In classicsreadinggroup@yahoogroups.com, David Christie
                              <dgsc@i...> wrote:
                              >
                              >
                              > On Wednesday, December 1, 2004, at 02:44 PM, MandyCandyLand@c...
                              > wrote:
                              >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > One Hundred Years of Solitude- Gabriel Garcia Marquez.
                              > >
                              > > One of the 20th century's enduring works, One Hundred
                              Years
                              > > of Solitude is a widely beloved and acclaimed novel known
                              throughout
                              > > the world, and the ultimate achievement in a Nobel Prize–winning
                              > > career.
                              > >
                              >
                              > I have failed to finish this twice but would quite like to have
                              another
                              > go, this time with some moral support.
                              > I vote for One Hundred Years of Solitude !
                              > David C
                            • Michael Parker
                              ... Now we all know that the postmodernists are wont to select older texts and re-do them in a more up-to-date fashion. Well, Kathy Acker loved to do this and
                              Message 14 of 19 , Dec 4, 2004
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                                Frank wrote:

                                > I was going for the Cervantes one, seeing as i've
                                > never heard of the other. What's it about?

                                Now we all know that the postmodernists are wont to select older texts
                                and re-do them in a more up-to-date fashion. Well, Kathy Acker loved to
                                do this and she out and out called it plagiarizing. For the story of
                                Don Quixote she did a little gender bending and ... well, here is a
                                blurb from the copy I have --


                                Kathy Acker's Don Quixote is an indomitable woman on a formidable
                                quest: to become a knight and defeat the evil enchanters of modern
                                America by pursuing "the most insane idea that any woman can think of.
                                Which is to love."

                                In this visionary world, Don Quixote journeys through American history
                                to the final days of the Nixon administration, passing on the way
                                through a New York reminiscent of prerevolutionary St. Petersburg and a
                                brutally defamiliarized contemporary London. Here transvestites who
                                might play at being Nazis and beautiful she-males enact the rituals of
                                courtly love. Presiding over this late-twentieth-century Leviathan is
                                Thomas Hobbes -- the Angel of Death.


                                If you haven't read Kathy Acker, keep and open mind and grab the safety
                                bar -- it can be a wild ride!

                                --
                                Mike (I'll have catfish on my grits) barely in New Jersey

                                A Celebration of Reading
                                ..... @ http://homepage.mac.com/mparker_46/ACOR
                                Yahoo Reading Groups:
                                ..... BFB @ http://groups.yahoo.com/group/BFB_Readers
                                ..... LSG @ http://groups.yahoo.com/group/LiteratureStudyGroup
                                ..... Bill @ http://groups.yahoo.com/group/BillShakespeare

                                Now Reading: [or carrying around]
                                ..... The Double (Jose Saramago)
                                ..... Why I Am Not a Christian (Bertrand Russell)
                                ..... The Odd Woman (George Gissing)
                                Just Finished:
                                ..... Nova Express (William S. Burroughs)
                                ..... Arc d'X (Steve Erickson)
                                ..... The Final Solution (Michael Chabon)
                                On Tap:
                                ..... Man Crazy (Joyce Carol Oates)
                                ..... The Sensualist (Barbara Hodgson)
                                ..... Moby Dick (Herman Melville)
                                ..... Don Quixote (Kathy Acker)
                                ..... Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance (Robert M. Pirsig)
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