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Flaubert and his parrot

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  • gheorghe nechitoaia
    Hello everyone! My name is Nechitoaia, i am 24 and i live in Bucharest. Glad to see that you`re discussing Madame Bovary. I read a few months ago Julian
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 1, 2004
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      Hello everyone!

      My name is Nechitoaia, i am 24 and i live in Bucharest. Glad to see that you`re discussing Madame Bovary. I read a few months ago Julian Barnes` novel " Flaubert`s Parrot" and it was like a little revelation, because beforehand i hadn`t paid any attention to Flaubert, although i knew he was a famous writer. But Julian Barnes loves Flaubert, and i bagan to love him too. For his skepticism, for his sour quotes, for his generous struggle to find the proper words.

      Well, looking forward hearing from you again.

      Nechitoaia


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      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • blueeyesmeg
      Hi Nechitoaia, welcome to the club and looking forward to your posts. When I was checking Flaubert out on the web I did notice Julain Barnes novel Flaubert s
      Message 2 of 5 , Sep 1, 2004
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        Hi Nechitoaia, welcome to the club and looking forward to your posts.
        When I was checking Flaubert out on the web I did notice Julain
        Barnes' novel "Flaubert's Parrot". I have not read it, but does it in
        anyway refer to Madame Bovary?
        I found Flaubert to to be quite ironical and loved reading Madame Bovary.

        Meg

        > Hello everyone!
        >
        > My name is Nechitoaia, i am 24 and i live in Bucharest. Glad to see
        that you`re discussing Madame Bovary. I read a few months ago Julian
        Barnes` novel " Flaubert`s Parrot" and it was like a little
        revelation, because beforehand i hadn`t paid any attention to
        Flaubert, although i knew he was a famous writer. But Julian Barnes
        loves Flaubert, and i bagan to love him too. For his skepticism, for
        his sour quotes, for his generous struggle to find the proper words.
        >
        > Well, looking forward hearing from you again.
        >
        > Nechitoaia
      • gheorghe nechitoaia
        blueeyesmeg wrote: When I was checking Flaubert out on the web I did notice Julain Barnes novel Flaubert s Parrot . I have
        Message 3 of 5 , Sep 2, 2004
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          blueeyesmeg <broughtonmargaret@...> wrote:
          When I was checking Flaubert out on the web I did notice Julain
          Barnes' novel "Flaubert's Parrot". I have not read it, but does it in
          anyway refer to Madame Bovary?
          Meg


          Yes, there are many references to Madame Bovary. I don`t know if in English there is this word, but in romanian `bovarism` means wishing to achieve purposes which are above one`s means. And thist is the point with Flaubert`s skepticism. He was a very realistic person, full of irony, an incisive and ofther bothering irony, towards idealists, dreamers. There is, for example, a passage where Barnes tells a discussion berween Flaubert and his best friend. The Paris court had decided that Madame Bovary was not to be subjected to banishing, for its apparent immorality, so Flaubert was happy about that and was preparing a second edition of the book. And he intended to make some minor changes in the text. For example to change the sentence " the unfortunate consequences of ther marriage" to " the unfortunate consequences of marriage" , so avoiding the word `her`. And its almost amuzing, Flaubert`s friend is asking him not to change, by any reason, that sencence, because its entirely meaning
          will change accordingly. It would mean that he atacks the marriage in general, and not just Madame Bovary`s marriage, `her` marriage. And, states Flaubert`s friend, this would mean another scandal.

          I am glad you enjoyed reading Madame Bovary. What did you like most?



          Regards,

          Nechitoaia



          ---------------------------------
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          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • blueeyesmeg
          ... English there is this word, but in romanian `bovarism` means wishing to achieve purposes which are above one`s means. And thist is the point with
          Message 4 of 5 , Sep 2, 2004
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            --- In classicsreadinggroup@yahoogroups.com, gheorghe nechitoaia
            <nechitoaia@y...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > blueeyesmeg <broughtonmargaret@h...> wrote:
            > When I was checking Flaubert out on the web I did notice Julain
            > Barnes' novel "Flaubert's Parrot". I have not read it, but does it in
            > anyway refer to Madame Bovary?
            > Meg
            >
            >
            > Yes, there are many references to Madame Bovary. I don`t know if in
            English there is this word, but in romanian `bovarism` means wishing
            to achieve purposes which are above one`s means. And thist is the
            point with Flaubert`s skepticism. He was a very realistic person, full
            of irony, an incisive and ofther bothering irony, towards idealists,
            dreamers. There is, for example, a passage where Barnes tells a
            discussion berween Flaubert and his best friend. The Paris court had
            decided that Madame Bovary was not to be subjected to banishing, for
            its apparent immorality, so Flaubert was happy about that and was
            preparing a second edition of the book. And he intended to make some
            minor changes in the text. For example to change the sentence " the
            unfortunate consequences of ther marriage" to " the unfortunate
            consequences of marriage" , so avoiding the word `her`. And its almost
            amuzing, Flaubert`s friend is asking him not to change, by any reason,
            that sencence, because its entirely meaning
            > will change accordingly. It would mean that he atacks the marriage
            in general, and not just Madame Bovary`s marriage, `her` marriage.
            And, states Flaubert`s friend, this would mean another scandal.
            >
            > I am glad you enjoyed reading Madame Bovary. What did you like most?
            >
            >
            >
            > Regards,
            >
            > Nechitoaia
            >
            >
            >
            > ---------------------------------
            > Do you Yahoo!?
            > Win 1 of 4,000 free domain names from Yahoo! Enter now.
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • blueeyesmeg
            Hi all, sorry about the last message, hit the wrong key. Nechitoaia, I am off to China next week for three weeks so unfortunately won t be able to discuss this
            Message 5 of 5 , Sep 2, 2004
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              Hi all, sorry about the last message, hit the wrong key. Nechitoaia, I
              am off to China next week for three weeks so unfortunately won't be
              able to discuss this book as much as I would have liked. I too enjoyed
              Flaubert's skepticism and sending up of the 'bourgeois society'. But
              to answer your questions I have put the word 'spoiler' in so people
              who have not finished reading the book will not read further.
              S
              p
              o
              i
              l
              e
              r
              I had several favourite parts, and one was when Rudolphe's 'art of
              seduction' on Emma was interspersed against the opening of the
              agriculture show by the councillor. Dreams and passion were in
              opposition to hard work and duty. "....I shall be something in your
              thoughts, in your life, shall I not?" "Pig Section equal prizes to
              ...." and "They looked at each other. A supreme desire made their dry
              lips tremble, and softly, without effort, their fingers entwined.
              'Catherine Nigaise-Elizabeth Leroux, of Sasselot-la-Guerriere, for
              fifty-four years of service at the same farm, a silver medal valued at
              twenty-five francs.'" And of course I had a laugh when Charles wrote
              to Rodolphe saying "his wife was at his disposition and that they
              counted on his kindness." Rodolphe was very obliging!
              What I did find strange but amusing was that Flaubert mocks Emma's
              reading. Poor Emma wants to live a life like a romantic heroine in a
              novel but dies in her attempt to do so! Mr Flaubert was no romantic
              and Emma was no romantic heroine. Emma lived by her imagination; she
              was self-indulgent and really didn't have any true feelings for anyone.
              What was your favourite part?

              Meg


              >
              > Yes, there are many references to Madame Bovary. I don`t know if in
              English there is this word, but in romanian `bovarism` means wishing
              to achieve purposes which are above one`s means. And thist is the
              point with Flaubert`s skepticism. He was a very realistic person, full
              of irony, an incisive and ofther bothering irony, towards idealists,
              dreamers. There is, for example, a passage where Barnes tells a
              discussion berween Flaubert and his best friend. The Paris court had
              decided that Madame Bovary was not to be subjected to banishing, for
              its apparent immorality, so Flaubert was happy about that and was
              preparing a second edition of the book. And he intended to make some
              minor changes in the text. For example to change the sentence " the
              unfortunate consequences of ther marriage" to " the unfortunate
              consequences of marriage" , so avoiding the word `her`. And its almost
              amuzing, Flaubert`s friend is asking him not to change, by any reason,
              that sencence, because its entirely meaning
              > will change accordingly. It would mean that he atacks the marriage
              in general, and not just Madame Bovary`s marriage, `her` marriage.
              And, states Flaubert`s friend, this would mean another scandal.
              >
              > I am glad you enjoyed reading Madame Bovary. What did you like most?
              > Regards,
              > Nechitoaia
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