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Re: [classicrv] Re: Electrical problem

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  • tmead17327@aol.com
    Thanks for the suggestion, Bill. Yes, I ve done the math and I should be fine with only a 20A charger. I have 2 golf cart batteries (from Sam s) in series
    Message 1 of 15 , Feb 4, 2002
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      Thanks for the suggestion, Bill. Yes, I've done the math and I should be
      fine with only a 20A charger. I have 2 golf cart batteries (from Sam's) in
      series rated at 210 minutes @ a 75 amp discharge rate. "Managing 12 Volts"
      is a book available from Camping World (and others) that I'd recommend for
      anyone interested in gaining a working knowledge of some of the technical
      aspects of rv electrical systems. It's very easy to read and does a great
      job correctly explaining things on a level most of us can read.
      Interpolating from a chart in the book, my batteries should be good for about
      400 amp hours (to full discharge) at the rates I'm likely to use them. If I
      only use 50% of my capacity, I'm good for 200 amp hours, and by my best
      calculations, I'll probably never go over 20 amp hours per day usage. (We
      really just don't use much electricity). I also don't foresee ever
      boondocking more than 10 days in a row (unfortunately!), so my reliance on
      the charger should be seldom. It'll mostly do its work in between trips, and
      it has a setting for "maintenance" that I can use when the rv is dormant.

      I got the charger from Sears for something like $80 or $90. It has a deep
      cycle setting, and its max output is 20A. If it turns out that it doesn't
      have as much oomph (technical term) as I need, I guess I can always put my
      30A converter back in and connect it as you described.

      Thanks for the dialogue. It's good to compare notes to be sure we're not
      missing any details and you never know, we might inspire somebody else!

      Tommy
      TMead17327@...
    • wrdavis95370
      Indeed, I suspect I m a user of electrons, Tommy. Rather than reboot my computer, I d just leave it running and go into suspend mode. But I was running the
      Message 2 of 15 , Feb 4, 2002
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        Indeed, I suspect I'm a user of electrons, Tommy.

        Rather than reboot my computer, I'd just leave it running and go into
        suspend mode. But I was running the laptop from a small 140W
        inverter. Those inverters are pretty efficent at high loads, but
        that's not true at low loads. The ProSine true sine wave inverter is
        good at all power levels. Wish I could afford one. But what the
        heck, lots of electrons back in the batteries.

        And then the TV and DSS, small loads on my 600W inverter, but toss in
        the electric blanket on cold nights and the power goes up. And the
        battery charger for the spot-lifter and the battery powered drill
        spare batteries in their charger. Need the drill charged, so I can
        run the levelers up and down. The radio in the bedroom, on all
        night, so I can listen to wierd Art Bell. A couple oscillating fans
        and bunk lights for reading and the water pump for those long,
        roughing it showers.

        The big killer is all those LED's on everything. Seems everything
        has to have some dumb indicator to show its on. 20mA per LED and
        there goes the battery life. Ten of those little current draw LED
        suckers and you have 5 amp hours a day disappearing. One reason I
        have a door switch to shut my breaker's LED indicators off when I'm
        not looking at them.

        And now I've gone to a 1000W inverter, so I can run my little
        microwave at 500W, or even the coffee maker and toaster one at a
        time. A few days of roughing it and I have dead deep cycle batteries.

        And if its cold out and I turn the furnace on, by morning its blowing
        cold air. Since the furnace sail switch will shut the gas off, but
        leave the blower running to deplete the batteries. One of the
        cleverest things I've seen.

        Bill Davis
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