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rv water tank

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  • corby g
    Do i need to ground my water tank or pump? My old water tank had ground wiers going to it from the pump, pos and neg. are these still nessesary?
    Message 1 of 7 , May 26 7:31 PM
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      Do i need to ground my water tank or pump? My old water tank had ground wiers going to it from the pump, pos and neg. are these still nessesary?
    • mike
      You didn t give much info....but, a brief explanation seems in order here... First of all, the real world application of ground wires is lightning and
      Message 2 of 7 , May 27 5:49 AM
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        You didn't give much info....but, a brief explanation seems in order here...

        First of all, the 'real world' application of "ground wires" is lightning and transient protection to your home wiring, and, is required to be done by building code.

        So, in an RV, there is no actual "grounding".
        Unless, of course you sink a ground rod to give protection when connected to shore power.

        Yes, it's common to refer to the chassis of motorized vehicles as "Ground"...but, that is technically in error.

        Getting back to your water tank...

        It's probably plastic, and, any attempt at "grounding" it would be a waste of time.

        There are likely wires connected to little posts (those are called "mini-probes") that provide an electrical connection to the water to allow a water level monitor to detect the level of the water in the tank.

        and, as far as the pump goes, it takes electricity from the electrical system to make it whirl...
        The wires going to the plus and minus terminals of the pump are supply wires bringing that needed energy to the pump.

        You will find a positive wire and a negative wire.
        The negative wire is common to the entire vehicle as it connects to the metal chassis...
        or, as some like to call it "ground"!
        And the positive side will connect to the "hot' side which will pass through a switch and back to the converter.

        Mike in Elkhart

        --- In classicrv@yahoogroups.com, "corby g" <cguillett@...> wrote:
        >
        > Do i need to ground my water tank or pump? My old water tank had ground wiers going to it from the pump, pos and neg. are these still nessesary?
        >
      • Wncol2004
        From what I know there are 3 connections on a 30 amp 120 volt connection. One is hot, one is return and the 3rd prong is ground. Earth ground. So, if you
        Message 3 of 7 , May 27 6:17 AM
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          From what I know there are 3 connections on a 30 amp 120 volt connection.
          One is hot, one is return and the 3rd prong is ground. Earth ground.
          So, if you connect that 3rd wire (green) from the power cord to your frame,chassis, your grounded to a true ground. No sinking of a ground rod needed...though sinking a ground rod will do even better but is not practical.
          When I rewired my trailer, that is what I did. Connected the 3rd wire (Green wire) to the metal body, chassis of my trailer.
          --
          Warren
          1995 Ford F-350 Centurion 7.3 power stroke diesel dually (Sam).
          1953 Airstream Cruiser Travel trailer (The Runaway Sue)
          Western KY
          Sent from my iPad 2.

          On May 27, 2013, at 7:49 AM, "mike" <k9qb@...> wrote:

          > You didn't give much info....but, a brief explanation seems in order here...
          >
          > First of all, the 'real world' application of "ground wires" is lightning and transient protection to your home wiring, and, is required to be done by building code.
          >
          > So, in an RV, there is no actual "grounding".
          > Unless, of course you sink a ground rod to give protection when connected to shore power.
          >
          > Yes, it's common to refer to the chassis of motorized vehicles as "Ground"...but, that is technically in error.
          >
          > Getting back to your water tank...
          >
          > It's probably plastic, and, any attempt at "grounding" it would be a waste of time.
          >
          > There are likely wires connected to little posts (those are called "mini-probes") that provide an electrical connection to the water to allow a water level monitor to detect the level of the water in the tank.
          >
          > and, as far as the pump goes, it takes electricity from the electrical system to make it whirl...
          > The wires going to the plus and minus terminals of the pump are supply wires bringing that needed energy to the pump.
          >
          > You will find a positive wire and a negative wire.
          > The negative wire is common to the entire vehicle as it connects to the metal chassis...
          > or, as some like to call it "ground"!
          > And the positive side will connect to the "hot' side which will pass through a switch and back to the converter.
          >
          > Mike in Elkhart
          >
          > --- In classicrv@yahoogroups.com, "corby g" <cguillett@...> wrote:
          > >
          > > Do i need to ground my water tank or pump? My old water tank had ground wiers going to it from the pump, pos and neg. are these still nessesary?
          > >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Bill Miller
          Thanks Warren; I was going to jump in and try to explain this, but your explanation is pretty clear. mainiac bill ________________________________ From:
          Message 4 of 7 , May 27 7:02 AM
          • 0 Attachment
            Thanks Warren;
            I was going to jump in and try to explain this, but your explanation is pretty clear.

            mainiac bill




            ________________________________
            From: Wncol2004 <wncol2004@...>
            To: "classicrv@yahoogroups.com" <classicrv@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Monday, May 27, 2013 9:17 AM
            Subject: Re: [classicrv] Re: rv water tank



             
            From what I know there are 3 connections on a 30 amp 120 volt connection.
            One is hot, one is return and the 3rd prong is ground. Earth ground.
            So, if you connect that 3rd wire (green) from the power cord to your frame,chassis, your grounded to a true ground. No sinking of a ground rod needed...though sinking a ground rod will do even better but is not practical.
            When I rewired my trailer, that is what I did. Connected the 3rd wire (Green wire) to the metal body, chassis of my trailer.
            --
            Warren
            1995 Ford F-350 Centurion 7.3 power stroke diesel dually (Sam).
            1953 Airstream Cruiser Travel trailer (The Runaway Sue)
            Western KY
            Sent from my iPad 2.

            On May 27, 2013, at 7:49 AM, "mike" <k9qb@...> wrote:

            > You didn't give much info....but, a brief explanation seems in order here...
            >
            > First of all, the 'real world' application of "ground wires" is lightning and transient protection to your home wiring, and, is required to be done by building code.
            >
            > So, in an RV, there is no actual "grounding".
            > Unless, of course you sink a ground rod to give protection when connected to shore power.
            >
            > Yes, it's common to refer to the chassis of motorized vehicles as "Ground"...but, that is technically in error.
            >
            > Getting back to your water tank...
            >
            > It's probably plastic, and, any attempt at "grounding" it would be a waste of time.
            >
            > There are likely wires connected to little posts (those are called "mini-probes") that provide an electrical connection to the water to allow a water level monitor to detect the level of the water in the tank.
            >
            > and, as far as the pump goes, it takes electricity from the electrical system to make it whirl...
            > The wires going to the plus and minus terminals of the pump are supply wires bringing that needed energy to the pump.
            >
            > You will find a positive wire and a negative wire.
            > The negative wire is common to the entire vehicle as it connects to the metal chassis...
            > or, as some like to call it "ground"!
            > And the positive side will connect to the "hot' side which will pass through a switch and back to the converter.
            >
            > Mike in Elkhart
            >
            > --- In classicrv@yahoogroups.com, "corby g" <cguillett@...> wrote:
            > >
            > > Do i need to ground my water tank or pump? My old water tank had ground wiers going to it from the pump, pos and neg. are these still nessesary?
            > >
            >
            >

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Warren
            Thanks. I had to rewire my trailer so, I did a lot of homework before I started and during the process. wanted to make sure I was safe in what I was doing. Got
            Message 5 of 7 , May 28 12:28 PM
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              Thanks.
              I had to rewire my trailer so, I did a lot of homework before I started and
              during the process.
              wanted to make sure I was safe in what I was doing. Got enough tacky lights
              as it is. Didn't want to add anyone to that list. Didn't want anyone to
              get lit up when they touched the trailer kind of thing. lol.




              On Mon, May 27, 2013 at 9:02 AM, Bill Miller <mainiac1946@...> wrote:

              > **
              >
              >
              > Thanks Warren;
              > I was going to jump in and try to explain this, but your explanation is
              > pretty clear.
              >
              > mainiac bill
              >
              > ________________________________
              > From: Wncol2004 <wncol2004@...>
              > To: "classicrv@yahoogroups.com" <classicrv@yahoogroups.com>
              > Sent: Monday, May 27, 2013 9:17 AM
              > Subject: Re: [classicrv] Re: rv water tank
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > From what I know there are 3 connections on a 30 amp 120 volt connection.
              > One is hot, one is return and the 3rd prong is ground. Earth ground.
              > So, if you connect that 3rd wire (green) from the power cord to your
              > frame,chassis, your grounded to a true ground. No sinking of a ground rod
              > needed...though sinking a ground rod will do even better but is not
              > practical.
              > When I rewired my trailer, that is what I did. Connected the 3rd wire
              > (Green wire) to the metal body, chassis of my trailer.
              > --
              > Warren
              > 1995 Ford F-350 Centurion 7.3 power stroke diesel dually (Sam).
              > 1953 Airstream Cruiser Travel trailer (The Runaway Sue)
              > Western KY
              > Sent from my iPad 2.
              >
              > On May 27, 2013, at 7:49 AM, "mike" <k9qb@...> wrote:
              >
              > > You didn't give much info....but, a brief explanation seems in order
              > here...
              > >
              > > First of all, the 'real world' application of "ground wires" is
              > lightning and transient protection to your home wiring, and, is required to
              > be done by building code.
              > >
              > > So, in an RV, there is no actual "grounding".
              > > Unless, of course you sink a ground rod to give protection when
              > connected to shore power.
              > >
              > > Yes, it's common to refer to the chassis of motorized vehicles as
              > "Ground"...but, that is technically in error.
              > >
              > > Getting back to your water tank...
              > >
              > > It's probably plastic, and, any attempt at "grounding" it would be a
              > waste of time.
              > >
              > > There are likely wires connected to little posts (those are called
              > "mini-probes") that provide an electrical connection to the water to allow
              > a water level monitor to detect the level of the water in the tank.
              > >
              > > and, as far as the pump goes, it takes electricity from the electrical
              > system to make it whirl...
              > > The wires going to the plus and minus terminals of the pump are supply
              > wires bringing that needed energy to the pump.
              > >
              > > You will find a positive wire and a negative wire.
              > > The negative wire is common to the entire vehicle as it connects to the
              > metal chassis...
              > > or, as some like to call it "ground"!
              > > And the positive side will connect to the "hot' side which will pass
              > through a switch and back to the converter.
              > >
              > > Mike in Elkhart
              > >
              > > --- In classicrv@yahoogroups.com, "corby g" <cguillett@...> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > Do i need to ground my water tank or pump? My old water tank had
              > ground wiers going to it from the pump, pos and neg. are these still
              > nessesary?
              > > >
              > >
              > >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              >



              --
              Warren
              1995 Ford F-350 XLT 7.3 PowerStroke Centurion conversion dually crew cab
              pickup (Sam)
              1953 Airstream Cruiser Travel trailer (The Runaway Sue)
              Western KY


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • corby g
              water tank and power connected. just need to tighten all the nuts and bolts and hoseclamps.
              Message 6 of 7 , Jun 4, 2013
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                water tank and power connected. just need to tighten all the nuts and bolts and hoseclamps.

                --- In classicrv@yahoogroups.com, Bill Miller <mainiac1946@...> wrote:
                >
                > Thanks Warren;
                > I was going to jump in and try to explain this, but your explanation is pretty clear.
                >
                > mainiac bill
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > ________________________________
                > From: Wncol2004 <wncol2004@...>
                > To: "classicrv@yahoogroups.com" <classicrv@yahoogroups.com>
                > Sent: Monday, May 27, 2013 9:17 AM
                > Subject: Re: [classicrv] Re: rv water tank
                >
                >
                >
                >  
                > From what I know there are 3 connections on a 30 amp 120 volt connection.
                > One is hot, one is return and the 3rd prong is ground. Earth ground.
                > So, if you connect that 3rd wire (green) from the power cord to your frame,chassis, your grounded to a true ground. No sinking of a ground rod needed...though sinking a ground rod will do even better but is not practical.
                > When I rewired my trailer, that is what I did. Connected the 3rd wire (Green wire) to the metal body, chassis of my trailer.
                > --
                > Warren
                > 1995 Ford F-350 Centurion 7.3 power stroke diesel dually (Sam).
                > 1953 Airstream Cruiser Travel trailer (The Runaway Sue)
                > Western KY
                > Sent from my iPad 2.
                >
                > On May 27, 2013, at 7:49 AM, "mike" <k9qb@...> wrote:
                >
                > > You didn't give much info....but, a brief explanation seems in order here...
                > >
                > > First of all, the 'real world' application of "ground wires" is lightning and transient protection to your home wiring, and, is required to be done by building code.
                > >
                > > So, in an RV, there is no actual "grounding".
                > > Unless, of course you sink a ground rod to give protection when connected to shore power.
                > >
                > > Yes, it's common to refer to the chassis of motorized vehicles as "Ground"...but, that is technically in error.
                > >
                > > Getting back to your water tank...
                > >
                > > It's probably plastic, and, any attempt at "grounding" it would be a waste of time.
                > >
                > > There are likely wires connected to little posts (those are called "mini-probes") that provide an electrical connection to the water to allow a water level monitor to detect the level of the water in the tank.
                > >
                > > and, as far as the pump goes, it takes electricity from the electrical system to make it whirl...
                > > The wires going to the plus and minus terminals of the pump are supply wires bringing that needed energy to the pump.
                > >
                > > You will find a positive wire and a negative wire.
                > > The negative wire is common to the entire vehicle as it connects to the metal chassis...
                > > or, as some like to call it "ground"!
                > > And the positive side will connect to the "hot' side which will pass through a switch and back to the converter.
                > >
                > > Mike in Elkhart
                > >
                > > --- In classicrv@yahoogroups.com, "corby g" <cguillett@> wrote:
                > > >
                > > > Do i need to ground my water tank or pump? My old water tank had ground wiers going to it from the pump, pos and neg. are these still nessesary?
                > > >
                > >
                > >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
              • RogerD
                A couple of comments after the great information here: Very important thing is to make sure the 120V hot and neutral wires are attached to the proper terminals
                Message 7 of 7 , Jun 6, 2013
                • 0 Attachment
                  A couple of comments after the great information here:
                  Very important thing is to make sure the 120V hot and neutral wires are attached to the proper terminals in a receptacle (and other things hard wired). Reversing these wires can give you a shock from touching whatever is plugged in. Examples are an on-off switch shutting off the neutral leaving the hot on all the time, or an exposed metal lamp socket will be hot all the time (think trouble light). In both cases YOU can become the ground! Easy to know where to put the wires in modern receptacles.

                  Chassis ground is a good thing, but it is not earth ground because the coach is mostly insulated by its tires. However, earth ground is supplied by your power cord from the shore power terminal. At the park where I live each power receptacle box has it's own earth ground stake which is optimum. In any case any legal electrical breaker panel will have an earth ground. The coach chassis ground should connect with the power cord ground wire (green) where it attaches inside.


                  --- In classicrv@yahoogroups.com, Warren <wncol2004@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Thanks.
                  > I had to rewire my trailer so, I did a lot of homework before I started and
                  > during the process.
                  > wanted to make sure I was safe in what I was doing. Got enough tacky lights
                  > as it is. Didn't want to add anyone to that list. Didn't want anyone to
                  > get lit up when they touched the trailer kind of thing. lol.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > On Mon, May 27, 2013 at 9:02 AM, Bill Miller <mainiac1946@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > > **
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Thanks Warren;
                  > > I was going to jump in and try to explain this, but your explanation is
                  > > pretty clear.
                  > >
                  > > mainiac bill
                  > >
                  > > ________________________________
                  > > From: Wncol2004 <wncol2004@...>
                  > > To: "classicrv@yahoogroups.com" <classicrv@yahoogroups.com>
                  > > Sent: Monday, May 27, 2013 9:17 AM
                  > > Subject: Re: [classicrv] Re: rv water tank
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > From what I know there are 3 connections on a 30 amp 120 volt connection.
                  > > One is hot, one is return and the 3rd prong is ground. Earth ground.
                  > > So, if you connect that 3rd wire (green) from the power cord to your
                  > > frame,chassis, your grounded to a true ground. No sinking of a ground rod
                  > > needed...though sinking a ground rod will do even better but is not
                  > > practical.
                  > > When I rewired my trailer, that is what I did. Connected the 3rd wire
                  > > (Green wire) to the metal body, chassis of my trailer.
                  > > --
                  > > Warren
                  > > 1995 Ford F-350 Centurion 7.3 power stroke diesel dually (Sam).
                  > > 1953 Airstream Cruiser Travel trailer (The Runaway Sue)
                  > > Western KY
                  > > Sent from my iPad 2.
                  > >
                  > > On May 27, 2013, at 7:49 AM, "mike" <k9qb@...> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > > You didn't give much info....but, a brief explanation seems in order
                  > > here...
                  > > >
                  > > > First of all, the 'real world' application of "ground wires" is
                  > > lightning and transient protection to your home wiring, and, is required to
                  > > be done by building code.
                  > > >
                  > > > So, in an RV, there is no actual "grounding".
                  > > > Unless, of course you sink a ground rod to give protection when
                  > > connected to shore power.
                  > > >
                  > > > Yes, it's common to refer to the chassis of motorized vehicles as
                  > > "Ground"...but, that is technically in error.
                  > > >
                  > > > Getting back to your water tank...
                  > > >
                  > > > It's probably plastic, and, any attempt at "grounding" it would be a
                  > > waste of time.
                  > > >
                  > > > There are likely wires connected to little posts (those are called
                  > > "mini-probes") that provide an electrical connection to the water to allow
                  > > a water level monitor to detect the level of the water in the tank.
                  > > >
                  > > > and, as far as the pump goes, it takes electricity from the electrical
                  > > system to make it whirl...
                  > > > The wires going to the plus and minus terminals of the pump are supply
                  > > wires bringing that needed energy to the pump.
                  > > >
                  > > > You will find a positive wire and a negative wire.
                  > > > The negative wire is common to the entire vehicle as it connects to the
                  > > metal chassis...
                  > > > or, as some like to call it "ground"!
                  > > > And the positive side will connect to the "hot' side which will pass
                  > > through a switch and back to the converter.
                  > > >
                  > > > Mike in Elkhart
                  > > >
                  > > > --- In classicrv@yahoogroups.com, "corby g" <cguillett@> wrote:
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Do i need to ground my water tank or pump? My old water tank had
                  > > ground wiers going to it from the pump, pos and neg. are these still
                  > > nessesary?
                  > > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > >
                  > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  > >
                  > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > --
                  > Warren
                  > 1995 Ford F-350 XLT 7.3 PowerStroke Centurion conversion dually crew cab
                  > pickup (Sam)
                  > 1953 Airstream Cruiser Travel trailer (The Runaway Sue)
                  > Western KY
                  >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
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