Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: 1976 Pawnee

Expand Messages
  • corby g
    Thanks... we dent with dicor(Dycor)20/20 recommended by rv parts and service guy ay Vanboxtel rv in Green Bay WI. Really thick and heavy almost like caulk
    Message 1 of 3 , May 12, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      Thanks... we dent with dicor(Dycor)20/20 recommended by rv parts and service guy ay Vanboxtel rv in Green Bay WI. Really thick and heavy almost like caulk but applied with a brush. Was going to use Kool seal but he recommended this. He had 3 or 4 different brands to choose from. Said that should work best for us and last the longest.

      --- In classicrv@yahoogroups.com, Todd Barnard <twbarnard@...> wrote:
      >
      > In '76 most roofs were either galvanized steel or aluminum. Both would
      > have had a petroleum based (Storm King) product that had fibrous and
      > reflective additives. I always recommend sticking with the original
      > product if it hasn't already been recoated with a multitude if different
      > materials already.
      >
      > Best practice is, pick as hot a day as you can stand, wear work gloves and
      > scrape any loose material from the seam with a dull putty knife. I have a
      > 4" one that has a 8" long wooden handle.
      >
      > Being on a metal RV roof on a hot day is awful, but its really is the best
      > for softening the old material for scraping. The new coating will go on
      > thinner and flow better on these days too.
      >
      > The old roof coat can have very sharp edges, and if it has areas that stick
      > better than others, it can release unexpectedly as you are applying
      > pressure, and travel up the blade and handle in a heartbeat, slicing your
      > flesh. The longer handle give you slightly more reaction time, and often
      > allowed the coating to rise above your knuckles rather than gouging them.
      >
      > Anything still well bonded to the roof can stay and be coated over. Coat
      > the seams, around vents, accessories and any patches.
      >
      > I'm not a fan of coating the entire roof. I've seen roofs leaks that were
      > nearly impossible to locate after this has been done, either thru pinholes
      > developing over time, or punctures made by falling twigs and hail. A sharp,
      > heavy twig can hit hard enough to dimple and pierce the roofing, and I have
      > seen the coating pop back up leaving a relatively level surface, containing
      > a tiny hole or crack, suspended over a funnel shaped hole in the roofing.
      >
      > These can create a slow leak that can do a ton of damage long before its
      > noticed.
      >
      > If you have several different types of coating on the roof already, then
      > you could have several things going on.
      >
      > 1. A reaction can occur between the 2 coatings and weaken the bond to the
      > roof, causing it to come loose.
      >
      > 2. The bond between the 2 coatings can be stronger than the bond to the
      > roof, and the differing expansion rates of the 2 materials can cause them
      > to curl and peel.
      >
      > In either case, I recommend scraping off as much of the old material as
      > possible and picking a modern roof coat with some viscosity and fiber in
      > it. Again, coat over any remaining roof coat, knowing that the processes
      > mentioned above may occur and you may have to chase this condition over
      > several seasons to get it stabilized. Stick with the product you have
      > chosen. Going over it with the latest miracle coating is only going to
      > create avoidable problems.
      >
      > I have mentioned here many times that I am not a fan of the thinner (Kool
      > Seal) products. They look like hell on galv roofs as the rust tends to
      > bleed thru, and I have found that it can discolor and peel on any roof
      > where rain water can pool in oil cans or depressions.
      >
      > BTW, I saw someone here mention a tape that they would use and call it
      > "done for life". Sounds like a miracle to me!
      >
      > Some roofs are better designed and require less maintenance than others,
      > but all need regular inspection and touch up to be less likely to leak.
      > Invest a couple of hours time and some money on decent coatings, or pay for
      > the ceiling panels and rafters that will need replacing later.
      >
      > Customers would just about fall over at the price of a ceiling job, and
      > insurance companies are far more willing to deny coverage based on
      > improper or lack of maintenance.
      >
      > Todd.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > On Fri, May 3, 2013 at 6:47 AM, corby g <cguillett@...> wrote:
      >
      > > **
      > >
      > >
      > > I added some pics of The Pawnee. Starting to renovate. More pics to come.
      > > What to use on roof for sealer?? How much of the old crap needs to be
      > > removed, or just a clean surface. Not sure what rof is made of or what was
      > > used to cover or seal in past.Any help or advice appreciated. RV is kept in
      > > WI.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.