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Annoying caulking experience.

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  • Indiana Robinson
    One of our campers is an old slide-in truck camper. Waaaay too heavy to suit me. It is in need of some caulking as is our old Coachman trailer. A couple of
    Message 1 of 6 , Sep 25, 2011
      One of our campers is an old slide-in truck camper. Waaaay too heavy
      to suit me. It is in need of some caulking as is our old Coachman
      trailer. A couple of weeks ago I picked up a few tubes of caulking and
      some fresh masking tape (I don't follow the school of caulking that
      says that you glop it on 2" wide with an old shingle). I masked off a
      section on both sides of the corner seam and applied and spread the
      caulk and pulled the tape off. It looked real good.
      Now I have not liked the white RTV stuff for a long time so I just
      bought a decent grade (I thought) of latex caulking that was clearly
      marked for exterior use (as well as for tubs and sinks etc.). Two days
      later we had a heavy rain and most of it washed off... :-(
      I think I will change brands... :-)
      I would have thought that in two days it would have cured enough to
      stand a rain. I have used similar caulks before with great success. I
      know the tube said that it would "retain flexibility" but this was
      just silly.
      I did caulk a couple of seams on a home built "Gypsy Wagon" and it
      held fine there. I can only assume that because it is wood that the
      wood pulled some of the excess moisture out of the caulk so it sat up
      faster?
      I'll have to post a link to some pictures of the gypsy wagon, it is
      sort of "different".
      Our 4th camper is a sitting project waiting on me for a good start. It
      is a goose-neck 4 horse trailer with front living quarters. From the
      front of the bed up over the hitch to the back doors is 32'. Someone
      had cobbled a bunch of stuff into it and I have gutted most of it out
      but just haven't had time or energy to start on it yet. Maybe this
      winter... Or next... I'm retired, I don't like deadlines :-)



      --


      Nothing will teach you patience like a horse. Rule #1, the horse is
      rarely wrong...
      If you want to get inside of a horse's head love is the key, not anger
      or impatience and never revenge. Pet it, groom it, feed it, water it;
      and only then ask it to work with you as a friend.

      Francis Robinson
      aka "farmer"
      Central Indiana USA
      robinson46176@...
      https://sites.google.com/site/robinsonsprucecreekfarms/
    • Todd Barnard
      Hi Francis, I m not a fan of latex caulk or RVs simply for durability. Your home selodm sees a 60mph wind while you RV will every time you hit a highway. One
      Message 2 of 6 , Sep 25, 2011
        Hi Francis, I'm not a fan of latex caulk or RVs simply for durability. Your
        home selodm sees a 60mph wind while you RV will every time you hit a
        highway. One of the guys in our shop used 100% silicone and masked it off,
        I never used tape. I have used some other acrylic caulks with success, but
        when my co-worker used it with his method, it pulled stringy threads of the
        caulking off with the tape, making for a tedious clean up.

        If you're caulking aluminum to aluminum, I'd clean it well with isopropyl
        alcohol first. You can by it at the Walmart pharmacy very cheap. Just let
        it evaporate completely before you start to caulk.

        Before caulking around doors and windows, trim away any putty thats sticking
        out...do not use a knife or anything sharp, if you score the siding it will
        split.

        I have a type of poly rod that I was given at a Fleetwood service school
        years ago, but I have used a sharped stick or dowel in a pinch..not too
        sharp!

        12" of hardwood dowel sharpened in a pencil sharpener, the rounded over
        slightly with sandpaper works just fine. Hold the dowel in your fist with
        the sharpened end sticking our a few inches from your little finger. The
        dowel should be approx 45 degrees to the siding and 45 degrees back, and
        pull towards you.

        Here are 2 "picks" I just pulled from my tool box, the bottom on is the poly
        rod, the top is a dowel. I flattened the one end of the poly rod to push
        putty into wider gaps.

        The 2nd photo shows how I hold it.

        Good luck!
        Todd
        On Sun, Sep 25, 2011 at 9:25 AM, Indiana Robinson
        <robinson46176@...>wrote:

        > **
        >
        >
        > One of our campers is an old slide-in truck camper. Waaaay too heavy
        > to suit me. It is in need of some caulking as is our old Coachman
        > trailer. A couple of weeks ago I picked up a few tubes of caulking and
        > some fresh masking tape (I don't follow the school of caulking that
        > says that you glop it on 2" wide with an old shingle). I masked off a
        > section on both sides of the corner seam and applied and spread the
        > caulk and pulled the tape off. It looked real good.
        > Now I have not liked the white RTV stuff for a long time so I just
        > bought a decent grade (I thought) of latex caulking that was clearly
        > marked for exterior use (as well as for tubs and sinks etc.). Two days
        > later we had a heavy rain and most of it washed off... :-(
        > I think I will change brands... :-)
        > I would have thought that in two days it would have cured enough to
        > stand a rain. I have used similar caulks before with great success. I
        > know the tube said that it would "retain flexibility" but this was
        > just silly.
        > I did caulk a couple of seams on a home built "Gypsy Wagon" and it
        > held fine there. I can only assume that because it is wood that the
        > wood pulled some of the excess moisture out of the caulk so it sat up
        > faster?
        > I'll have to post a link to some pictures of the gypsy wagon, it is
        > sort of "different".
        > Our 4th camper is a sitting project waiting on me for a good start. It
        > is a goose-neck 4 horse trailer with front living quarters. From the
        > front of the bed up over the hitch to the back doors is 32'. Someone
        > had cobbled a bunch of stuff into it and I have gutted most of it out
        > but just haven't had time or energy to start on it yet. Maybe this
        > winter... Or next... I'm retired, I don't like deadlines :-)
        >
        > --
        >
        > Nothing will teach you patience like a horse. Rule #1, the horse is
        > rarely wrong...
        > If you want to get inside of a horse's head love is the key, not anger
        > or impatience and never revenge. Pet it, groom it, feed it, water it;
        > and only then ask it to work with you as a friend.
        >
        > Francis Robinson
        > aka "farmer"
        > Central Indiana USA
        > robinson46176@...
        > https://sites.google.com/site/robinsonsprucecreekfarms/
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • wpmartin55
        Francis, household silicone based products are not recommended generally for RVs. The best product to use is Dicor brand Lap sealant which you can get fromm
        Message 3 of 6 , Sep 26, 2011
          Francis, household silicone based products are not recommended generally for RVs. The best product to use is Dicor brand Lap sealant which you can get fromm any RV place. It comes in colors, and also in two types - one that's for vertical use (doesn't run) and the type that's for horizontal use (runs into the crack sealing it well). We've only found the white, tho' I know they make gray as well. You caulk it and it stays flexible a bit, but dries fairly quickly and will not wash off. We use it on both our modern and vintage campers with good results. I know there are some other good brands out there, but lap sealant is what you want.

          Cindy
        • Todd Barnard
          Cindy, I have to dissagree, you can use silicone on Siding and windows etc, its not recommended for roofing, especially rubber roofing. Lap sealants are
          Message 4 of 6 , Sep 26, 2011
            Cindy, I have to dissagree, you can use silicone on Siding and windows etc,
            its not recommended for roofing, especially rubber roofing.

            Lap sealants are primarily designed for roofing. They may modify them for
            siding use, but Silicones are fine.

            I used to get a product that came in a squeeze tube like toothpaste, I cant
            remember what we sold it as in the early '80s, but it became Parrbond, the
            Storm King(not to be confused with the roof coat!) and I think the last I
            got was made by Elixer???

            I used it for siding and windows...it was clear, went on very thin and stuck
            like the dickens! It was pricey for the small tube, but a little goes a
            long way and it was worth it.

            I'll
            try to find a link for it and sent it along.


            Todd.

            On Mon, Sep 26, 2011 at 4:19 AM, wpmartin55 <wpmartin55@...> wrote:

            > **
            >
            >
            >
            > Francis, household silicone based products are not recommended generally
            > for RVs. The best product to use is Dicor brand Lap sealant which you can
            > get fromm any RV place. It comes in colors, and also in two types - one
            > that's for vertical use (doesn't run) and the type that's for horizontal use
            > (runs into the crack sealing it well). We've only found the white, tho' I
            > know they make gray as well. You caulk it and it stays flexible a bit, but
            > dries fairly quickly and will not wash off. We use it on both our modern and
            > vintage campers with good results. I know there are some other good brands
            > out there, but lap sealant is what you want.
            >
            > Cindy
            >
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Todd Barnard
            Here is a pic of the tube I still have, and it looks like Storm King may have been a Canadian marketing name for this product, and I do seem to remember it
            Message 5 of 6 , Sep 26, 2011
              Here is a pic of the tube I still have, and it looks like Storm King may
              have been a Canadian marketing name for this product, and I do seem to
              remember it changing to Kop-R-Bond up there afterwards. I know in saw it in
              Walmart up there at the time too.

              However, a quick google of Parr Bond has it turn up a few places, even ebay,
              and I see it in a ton of forum posts for Airstreams etc.

              My tube is 8 years old and till pliable! This small tube sold for $5 Cdn in
              2003. Worth every penny.



              On Mon, Sep 26, 2011 at 8:15 AM, Todd Barnard <twbarnard@...> wrote:

              > Cindy, I have to dissagree, you can use silicone on Siding and windows etc,
              > its not recommended for roofing, especially rubber roofing.
              >
              > Lap sealants are primarily designed for roofing. They may modify them for
              > siding use, but Silicones are fine.
              >
              > I used to get a product that came in a squeeze tube like toothpaste, I cant
              > remember what we sold it as in the early '80s, but it became Parrbond, the
              > Storm King(not to be confused with the roof coat!) and I think the last I
              > got was made by Elixer???
              >
              > I used it for siding and windows...it was clear, went on very thin and
              > stuck like the dickens! It was pricey for the small tube, but a little goes
              > a long way and it was worth it.
              >
              > I'll
              > try to find a link for it and sent it along.
              >
              >
              > Todd.
              >
              >
              > On Mon, Sep 26, 2011 at 4:19 AM, wpmartin55 <wpmartin55@...> wrote:
              >
              >> **
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >> Francis, household silicone based products are not recommended generally
              >> for RVs. The best product to use is Dicor brand Lap sealant which you can
              >> get fromm any RV place. It comes in colors, and also in two types - one
              >> that's for vertical use (doesn't run) and the type that's for horizontal use
              >> (runs into the crack sealing it well). We've only found the white, tho' I
              >> know they make gray as well. You caulk it and it stays flexible a bit, but
              >> dries fairly quickly and will not wash off. We use it on both our modern and
              >> vintage campers with good results. I know there are some other good brands
              >> out there, but lap sealant is what you want.
              >>
              >> Cindy
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >
              >


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • wpmartin55
              ... Agreed. I suggested lap sealant because he WAS using it for the roof. Silicone is difficult to remove later and you can t paint over it, so it has
              Message 6 of 6 , Sep 27, 2011
                --- In classicrv@yahoogroups.com, Todd Barnard <twbarnard@...> wrote:
                >
                > Cindy, I have to dissagree, you can use silicone on Siding and windows etc,
                > its not recommended for roofing, especially rubber roofing.
                >
                > Lap sealants are primarily designed for roofing. They may modify them for
                > siding use, but Silicones are fine.
                >
                >

                Agreed. I suggested lap sealant because he WAS using it for the roof. Silicone is difficult to remove later and you can't paint over it, so it has limited usage for things like windows, etc.
                Cindy
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