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Re: Winter Water Use

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  • BobP
    Ned, That s good to know. I probably wouldn t have thought about the regulator having a required orientation. But I was really hoping it would be doable. The
    Message 1 of 14 , Mar 1, 2011
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      Ned,

      That's good to know. I probably wouldn't have thought about the regulator having a required orientation. But I was really hoping it would be doable. The few RV places I checked didn't do any propane installation work at all.

      I just paid $27 to fill the internal tank, but I've been buying pretty much full "gas grill" tanks at garage sales for $5- $10. Then I sell the empties for $8- $12 at fleamarkets. I still have a couple of full ones sitting around.

      For being "older" almost all of the units I looked at while shopping were pretty clean underneath. That says a lot about the effect of road salt. Heck I might even enjoy changing my fuel filter. Naww! Just kidding.

      Bob

      --- In classicrv@yahoogroups.com, Ned B <ned.crv@...> wrote:
      >
      > On 02/27/2011 04:48 PM, BobP wrote:
      > >
      > > I'm glad I don't have to use propane for heat. The don't deliver and I can't find room to put an extend-a-stay between the built in tank and the regulator. Maybe when it warms up and dries out a little I can crawl around under the camper to look closer.
      > >
      >
      > Hi Bob--
      >
      >
      > I had this same gas plumbing problem, so I went over to the propane
      > distributor and discussed it with a knowledgeable guy who suggested
      > installing the regulator vertically, on a 90-degree bend coming out of
      > the extend-a-stay. I made up a 90-degree bend, with the appropriate
      > fittings for the regulator and extend-a-stay, using brass fittings and a
      > small 90-degree black iron elbow (designed for gas plumbing). Everything
      > was in the gas plumbing section at the building supply (Lowes or Home
      > Depot will do). I paid about $10 for the parts. I also needed a new
      > rubber hose to reach from regulator outlet (in its new location) to
      > motorhome's rigid gas plumbing.
      >
      > At the time I couldn't find a regulator that was designed for vertical
      > installation (so the vent drains downward), but think they have them
      > here if you're looking:
      >
      > (http://www.shoprvparts.com/category.do?no=1117)
      >
      > G'luck!
      >
      > Ned Bedinger
      > 1983 Suncrest 24' "Boondoggle"
      > Southworth, WA
      >
      >
      > >
      >
    • Warren
      Just check that connector gasket on those used tanks before using them. I have a pair of used 30 lb bottles but the gaskets are shot. They leak when I connect
      Message 2 of 14 , Mar 1, 2011
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        Just check that connector gasket on those used tanks before using them.
        I have a pair of used 30 lb bottles but the gaskets are shot.
        They leak when I connect the hose to the tank. Not good.
        They are full but unusable. They don't leak as long as the valve is closed.

        --
        Warren
        1989 GMC R2500 HD Suburban.
        1953 Airstream Cruiser Travel trailer (The Runaway Sue)
        Western KY

        On Tue, Mar 1, 2011 at 5:22 AM, BobP <tvme33@...> wrote:

        >
        >
        > Ned,
        >
        > That's good to know. I probably wouldn't have thought about the regulator
        > having a required orientation. But I was really hoping it would be doable.
        > The few RV places I checked didn't do any propane installation work at all.
        >
        > I just paid $27 to fill the internal tank, but I've been buying pretty much
        > full "gas grill" tanks at garage sales for $5- $10. Then I sell the empties
        > for $8- $12 at fleamarkets. I still have a couple of full ones sitting
        > around.
        >
        > For being "older" almost all of the units I looked at while shopping were
        > pretty clean underneath. That says a lot about the effect of road salt. Heck
        > I might even enjoy changing my fuel filter. Naww! Just kidding.
        >
        > Bob
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • mcolie
        A single mother friend lives in a manufactured home (read trailer), and her water meter was in an insulated box. Now that her daughters have moved out, she
        Message 3 of 14 , Mar 3, 2011
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          A single mother friend lives in a "manufactured home" (read trailer), and her water meter was in an insulated box. Now that her daughters have moved out, she does not use enough water to keep it warm and it froze up last year.

          There is an outlet in the box, so last year I put a clamp light with a 70watt bulb in the box and she was good for the winter.

          She called in the early fall to say that it had frozen again, but the light was on.

          I went to look at the situation and . . .
          Are you ready???

          She had replace the bulb with a CFL......

          I wish I could make up stuff like this and sell it.

          Matt

          --- In classicrv@yahoogroups.com, "BobP" <tvme33@...> wrote:
          >
          > Thanks all.
          >
          > I've used the light bulb trick in a couple of houses. Surprising how much heat they put off. The "let the faucets trickle" idea is also from old houses. Enough flow to help might well wash most of the salt from the gray tank.
          >
          > I got the receptacle/ circuit issue sorted out the first morning after a few cups of coffee. It seems "someone" hung some clothes over the outlet on the other circuit. Once I found it in the bathroom the scribble on the breaker label started to look like "GFI". DUH! Live and learn.
          >
          > I think I'll try not hooking up the fresh water and see how it goes. I can always hook it up if the jugs become a pain. The water lines are running around the perimeter and would be difficult to keep above freezing. I'd planned on a trailer with a vinyl skirt similar to the ornamental skirts we used years ago on carnival concessions to keep some of the wind out. Class C's don't look easily "skirtable". The snaps are buried in storage somewhere anyway. <grin>
          >
          > Thanks again,
          > Bob
        • BobP
          Matt, LOL! I was a remodeling contractor for quite a few years and I was amazed sometimes. The long life energy efficient bulb almost makes some sort of
          Message 4 of 14 , Mar 4, 2011
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            Matt,

            LOL!

            I was a remodeling contractor for quite a few years and I was amazed sometimes. The long life energy efficient bulb "almost" makes some sort of sense! To be honest, I've certainly done sillier things. Thanks!

            Bob

            --- In classicrv@yahoogroups.com, "mcolie" <mattcolie@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > A single mother friend lives in a "manufactured home" (read trailer), and her water meter was in an insulated box. Now that her daughters have moved out, she does not use enough water to keep it warm and it froze up last year.
            >
            > There is an outlet in the box, so last year I put a clamp light with a 70watt bulb in the box and she was good for the winter.
            >
            > She called in the early fall to say that it had frozen again, but the light was on.
            >
            > I went to look at the situation and . . .
            > Are you ready???
            >
            > She had replace the bulb with a CFL......
            >
            > I wish I could make up stuff like this and sell it.
            >
            > Matt
          • Wesley Furr
            Better stock up on those bulbs...two years from now you won t be able to buy 40-100w incandescents...actually no more 100 s after the first of the coming year,
            Message 5 of 14 , Mar 4, 2011
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              Better stock up on those bulbs...two years from now you won't be able to buy
              40-100w incandescents...actually no more 100's after the first of the coming
              year, then going through smaller wattages down to the 40's.

              Wesley


              -----Original Message-----

              A single mother friend lives in a "manufactured home" (read trailer), and
              her water meter was in an insulated box. Now that her daughters have moved
              out, she does not use enough water to keep it warm and it froze up last
              year.

              There is an outlet in the box, so last year I put a clamp light with a
              70watt bulb in the box and she was good for the winter.

              She called in the early fall to say that it had frozen again, but the light
              was on.

              I went to look at the situation and . . .
              Are you ready???

              She had replace the bulb with a CFL......

              I wish I could make up stuff like this and sell it.

              Matt
            • wpmartin55
              ... We used to warm the watch dog s houses with incandescent bulbs. I guess the dogs will have to freeze now. :( Cindy
              Message 6 of 14 , Mar 5, 2011
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                >
                > I was a remodeling contractor for quite a few years and I was amazed sometimes. The long life energy efficient bulb "almost" makes some sort of sense! To be honest, I've certainly done sillier things. Thanks!
                >

                We used to warm the watch dog's houses with incandescent bulbs. I guess the dogs will have to freeze now. :(

                Cindy
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