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Help on charging problem

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  • drgwcs
    I have a 1992 Country camper class A with a Chevy 6.2L Diesel engine & Chassis. I just bought it a couple of months ago. The first time we took it out we lost
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 1, 2009
      I have a 1992 Country camper class A with a Chevy 6.2L Diesel engine & Chassis. I just bought it a couple of months ago. The first time we took it out we lost lights going down the interstate- not a pleasant experience! Took it into Larry Moe and Curly's truck service they couldn't find the problem. We pulled the alternator and took it in to have it tested and it checked out ok. (A couple of places gave us the same diagnosis.) On the vehicle it is running only 12 Volts and less when the lights are going. Any suggestions besides the ground? It is a possibility that the stock alternator is not powerful enough. It is a 64 Amp model (stock amperage) and there are the 2 chassis batteries and the 2 coach batteries as well as 14 running lights and the headlights and tail-lights. (I know from the receipts that the previous owner replaced the alt. in 98 and 02) The batteries are brand new. The needle drops as soon as you turn on the lights. I am considering unhooking the coach batteries and letting the genset charge them. I am also posting this to a couple of other lists too. I would appriciate any help
      Thanks
      Jim C.
    • skeetheflee
      I had that problem with my 83 Vogue 6.2 . I put a 125 amp alterator on it and changed the converter/charger to a three stage converter/charger and removed the
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 2, 2009
        I had that problem with my '83 Vogue 6.2 . I put a 125 amp alterator on it and changed the converter/charger to a three stage converter/charger and removed the battery isolator .Always be sure to top off the batteries before starting a trip as it will take all the juice away from the lights and such trying to charge them with the alternator .I kept poping the internal regulater in the alternator and it would then overcharge and burn out the lightbulbs .After the 3rd episode I changed things and havn't had the problem since .Hope this helps some .If you have a wiring diagram of the coach you might want to check for fusible links and make sure they are still letting juice pass through . Tom
      • hfred51
        The first thing you need to find out is if the alternator really might be too small. The easiest way is to take a volt reading at the battery with the ignition
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 2, 2009
          The first thing you need to find out is if the alternator really might be too small. The easiest way is to take a volt reading at the battery with the ignition key OFF. It should be 12 to 12.5 volts if the battery is good. Then start the vehicle and see what the voltage is with the engine running at a fast idle and all the accessories and lights off. If everything is working you should have 13.25 to around 13.75 volts. If you have 13 volts or more start turning on things, if the voltage drops when you turn on more lights and accessories then you need a bigger alternator. If you do increase the size of the alternator make sure that the "Bat" (battery) is heavy enough for the increased load.

          If the alternator has been tested good and the voltage doesn't increase when you start the engine you probably have a broken wire. Disconnect the battery and do the following. Finding a broken wire is about as much fun as a root canal. Diesels are notorious for their vibration. The first thing I normally do is a "stretch" test on the wires on the alternator. The insulation on a broken wire will stretch when you pull on it while an intact wire will not. Usually broken wire are pretty close to the alternator but they can be anyplace. If this doesn't find the problem you are going to have to check each of the wires out with a volt/ohm meter. This is the part part that is fun like a root canal. A wiring diagram would be helpful but all you need is to follow each wire from the alternator to it's other end. Often much easier said than done. Connect the Ohm meter to each end of the wire. When you get high or infinite resistance you have found your problem. Don't forget to disconnect the battery before going on the broken wire hunt. GOOD LUCK!

          --- In classicrv@yahoogroups.com, "drgwcs" <drgwcs@...> wrote:
          >
          > I have a 1992 Country camper class A with a Chevy 6.2L Diesel engine & Chassis. I just bought it a couple of months ago. The first time we took it out we lost lights going down the interstate- not a pleasant experience! Took it into Larry Moe and Curly's truck service they couldn't find the problem. We pulled the alternator and took it in to have it tested and it checked out ok. (A couple of places gave us the same diagnosis.) On the vehicle it is running only 12 Volts and less when the lights are going. Any suggestions besides the ground? It is a possibility that the stock alternator is not powerful enough. It is a 64 Amp model (stock amperage) and there are the 2 chassis batteries and the 2 coach batteries as well as 14 running lights and the headlights and tail-lights. (I know from the receipts that the previous owner replaced the alt. in 98 and 02) The batteries are brand new. The needle drops as soon as you turn on the lights. I am considering unhooking the coach batteries and letting the genset charge them. I am also posting this to a couple of other lists too. I would appriciate any help
          > Thanks
          > Jim C.
          >
        • Warren
          Yes, I would upgrade to a much larger alternator. From what I know, which isn t much mind you, Diesel engines are suppose to have at least a 100 amp
          Message 4 of 4 , Sep 2, 2009
            Yes, I would upgrade to a much larger alternator.
            From what I know, which isn't much mind you, Diesel engines are suppose to
            have at least a 100 amp alternator. A 64 amp can't charge 2 batteries that
            most diesel engines have under the hood especially with all the extra stuff
            a motorhome draws.

            My suburban (5.7 liter) has a 98 amp alternator. I would expect a diesel to
            have at least a 100 to 120. And a motor home even larger. Yup, Upgrade time.
            That and check all wires for proper clean connections.

            My suburban had a voltage problem and it turned out to be some after market
            inproperly sized end of wire connector that was crimped on and was
            overheating and increasing the resistance. Cut it off, put a new much
            larger copper connector and the problem was solved.

            Hope you get it fixed.
            --
            Warren
            1989 GMC R2500 HD Suburban.
            1953 Airstream Cruiser Travel trailer (The Runaway Sue)
            Western KY


            On Tue, Sep 1, 2009 at 9:36 PM, drgwcs <drgwcs@...> wrote:

            >
            >
            > I have a 1992 Country camper class A with a Chevy 6.2L Diesel engine &
            > Chassis. I just bought it a couple of months ago. The first time we took it
            > out we lost lights going down the interstate- not a pleasant
            > experience!...snip...
            >


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