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Re: Relay vs solid state battery isolator comparison

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  • ibdilbert2
    My 72 Winnie originally had a heavy duty relay that was meant to tie the batteries together. Would give you an extra boost to start, and charge the house
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 5, 2009
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      My 72 Winnie originally had a heavy duty relay that was meant to tie the batteries together. Would give you an extra boost to start, and charge the house batteries off the chassis alternator while traveling. The power to the switch is also off the ACC wire from the starter switch, so when the key switch is off, you can't accidentally keep the relay on and run the chassis battery down.

      I originally was going to replace mine with a solid state isolator, and I would have, had I not redesigned the system.

      Instead I added a second HO 250 amp alternator that charges my house batteries.

      I did add a cat master switch that I can tie the chassis battery to the house batteries, if I have an alternator failure, or chassis battery issues.


      1972 Classic Winnebago / Brave D20
      Dodge 340, 727 Tranny
      2 Alternators, one is a 3G Re-Wired 250 Amp
      Auto Transfer Switch with 3000/6000 Inverter
      128 Watts Solar / 500AH Battery Bank
      http://www.mywinnebago.com
    • d_wildemann
      I use a relay (solenoid operated switch) for mine. Reason is that the solid state unit drops the voltage by approximately half a volt. This may not enable
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 6, 2009
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        I use a relay (solenoid operated switch) for mine. Reason is that the solid state unit drops the voltage by approximately half a volt. This may not enable the battery to receive a full charge. In some models, you can adjust the voltage regulator up 1/2 a volt but then the motor battery is receiving excess voltage.

        Donw
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